Hawker Demon, 74 Sqdn., Malta Camouflage, 1936, from Airfix kit 1/72

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Hawker Demon, 74 Sqdn., Malta Camouflage, 1936, from Airfix kit 1/72

Joined: September 9th, 2004, 3:43 am

May 13th, 2012, 7:04 pm #1

During the summer of 1935, a number of RAF units were shipped out from Home establishment to the Near East and Mediterranean to bolster local air strength in the face of Mussolini's invasion of Ethiopia. Hawker Demons and personnel from several units were shipped to Malta, and once there, constituted as No. 74 Squadron. The Demons at Malta were given a camouflage finish unique in RAF service:



There have been a number of interpretations of this camouflage scheme, ranging from the variegated colors suggested in an old SAMI article by Mr. Lucas to plain dark earth and dark green.



Mine is based on some documentation Mr. Edgar Brooks was kind enough to share with me. The key element of it is a black and white photograph of a camouflaged Demon, in which the various swathes of grey tone have been crudely tinted, and identified by notations reading LE, LG, DE, DG (reasonably taken as light earth, light green, dark earth, dark green). This same photograph, without tint or notation, appears in the SAMI article mentioned above, and this allows for the various grey tones to be 'read' as color indications (on the not too great an assumption, I think, that the same film-stocks were used in the over-head air to air shot here). Written comments indicate metal parts were to be painted medium grey as a primer for the camouflage dopes, but that the dopes damaged the undercoat, and so the metal surfaces were left grey.



I have assisted the old Airfix Demon kit considerably. I have replaced the wings and tail surfaces with scratch-built items, scratch-built radiator and oil cooler, and re-worked the interface between the pilot's and gunner's cockpits. Most of the surface detail on the fuselage is also put on in replacement of what is provided (much of the original being ob;iterated in the course of building the thing). Cabane struts are also scratch-built, as are the Holt flare-holders. Wheels are from the spares box, originally from a Smer Dewoitine 510.











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Joined: December 4th, 2007, 1:33 am

May 13th, 2012, 9:29 pm #2

Even if half of it has been replaced!
Last edited by veltro-uk on May 13th, 2012, 9:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 24th, 2005, 1:07 pm

May 13th, 2012, 10:18 pm #3

During the summer of 1935, a number of RAF units were shipped out from Home establishment to the Near East and Mediterranean to bolster local air strength in the face of Mussolini's invasion of Ethiopia. Hawker Demons and personnel from several units were shipped to Malta, and once there, constituted as No. 74 Squadron. The Demons at Malta were given a camouflage finish unique in RAF service:



There have been a number of interpretations of this camouflage scheme, ranging from the variegated colors suggested in an old SAMI article by Mr. Lucas to plain dark earth and dark green.



Mine is based on some documentation Mr. Edgar Brooks was kind enough to share with me. The key element of it is a black and white photograph of a camouflaged Demon, in which the various swathes of grey tone have been crudely tinted, and identified by notations reading LE, LG, DE, DG (reasonably taken as light earth, light green, dark earth, dark green). This same photograph, without tint or notation, appears in the SAMI article mentioned above, and this allows for the various grey tones to be 'read' as color indications (on the not too great an assumption, I think, that the same film-stocks were used in the over-head air to air shot here). Written comments indicate metal parts were to be painted medium grey as a primer for the camouflage dopes, but that the dopes damaged the undercoat, and so the metal surfaces were left grey.



I have assisted the old Airfix Demon kit considerably. I have replaced the wings and tail surfaces with scratch-built items, scratch-built radiator and oil cooler, and re-worked the interface between the pilot's and gunner's cockpits. Most of the surface detail on the fuselage is also put on in replacement of what is provided (much of the original being ob;iterated in the course of building the thing). Cabane struts are also scratch-built, as are the Holt flare-holders. Wheels are from the spares box, originally from a Smer Dewoitine 510.











Good to see you back Old Man

Nice work on that classic kit - especially the oil cooler - I have obtained an Aeroclub Hart/Audax kit and the masterplan is to do some cross kitting with my Airfix Demon... something I have in mind for the Interwar GB after the summer... but probably I will end up with few Airfix bits

Hope to see more work from you - I hope to finish the Pinto on the 1/72 forum soon, then I hope to do another biplane, don't know yet what - got a few options and my mind keeps changing all the time

* <i></i> * *
William De Coster / Belgium / Plastic Stories

1/72 - Special Hobby - TT-1 Pinto : Part I (incl Panthers Cup 2012 show report)
1/72 - Airfix/Jo-Han - Mitsubishi Zero/Rufe conversion: Part I
1/72 - Airfix - Hawker Hurricane Mk.I : Part I - Part II - Part III - Part IV /end (incl. Model Force 2012 show report)

Just like the perfect woman doesn't exist, I will never build a perfect model.
Puts me on a par with God
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Joined: March 26th, 2009, 10:54 pm

May 13th, 2012, 10:26 pm #4

During the summer of 1935, a number of RAF units were shipped out from Home establishment to the Near East and Mediterranean to bolster local air strength in the face of Mussolini's invasion of Ethiopia. Hawker Demons and personnel from several units were shipped to Malta, and once there, constituted as No. 74 Squadron. The Demons at Malta were given a camouflage finish unique in RAF service:



There have been a number of interpretations of this camouflage scheme, ranging from the variegated colors suggested in an old SAMI article by Mr. Lucas to plain dark earth and dark green.



Mine is based on some documentation Mr. Edgar Brooks was kind enough to share with me. The key element of it is a black and white photograph of a camouflaged Demon, in which the various swathes of grey tone have been crudely tinted, and identified by notations reading LE, LG, DE, DG (reasonably taken as light earth, light green, dark earth, dark green). This same photograph, without tint or notation, appears in the SAMI article mentioned above, and this allows for the various grey tones to be 'read' as color indications (on the not too great an assumption, I think, that the same film-stocks were used in the over-head air to air shot here). Written comments indicate metal parts were to be painted medium grey as a primer for the camouflage dopes, but that the dopes damaged the undercoat, and so the metal surfaces were left grey.



I have assisted the old Airfix Demon kit considerably. I have replaced the wings and tail surfaces with scratch-built items, scratch-built radiator and oil cooler, and re-worked the interface between the pilot's and gunner's cockpits. Most of the surface detail on the fuselage is also put on in replacement of what is provided (much of the original being ob;iterated in the course of building the thing). Cabane struts are also scratch-built, as are the Holt flare-holders. Wheels are from the spares box, originally from a Smer Dewoitine 510.











I saw it previously on the other forum, and it still looks fab!

Regards,
Adrian
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Joined: February 26th, 2002, 4:32 am

May 14th, 2012, 12:21 am #5

During the summer of 1935, a number of RAF units were shipped out from Home establishment to the Near East and Mediterranean to bolster local air strength in the face of Mussolini's invasion of Ethiopia. Hawker Demons and personnel from several units were shipped to Malta, and once there, constituted as No. 74 Squadron. The Demons at Malta were given a camouflage finish unique in RAF service:



There have been a number of interpretations of this camouflage scheme, ranging from the variegated colors suggested in an old SAMI article by Mr. Lucas to plain dark earth and dark green.



Mine is based on some documentation Mr. Edgar Brooks was kind enough to share with me. The key element of it is a black and white photograph of a camouflaged Demon, in which the various swathes of grey tone have been crudely tinted, and identified by notations reading LE, LG, DE, DG (reasonably taken as light earth, light green, dark earth, dark green). This same photograph, without tint or notation, appears in the SAMI article mentioned above, and this allows for the various grey tones to be 'read' as color indications (on the not too great an assumption, I think, that the same film-stocks were used in the over-head air to air shot here). Written comments indicate metal parts were to be painted medium grey as a primer for the camouflage dopes, but that the dopes damaged the undercoat, and so the metal surfaces were left grey.



I have assisted the old Airfix Demon kit considerably. I have replaced the wings and tail surfaces with scratch-built items, scratch-built radiator and oil cooler, and re-worked the interface between the pilot's and gunner's cockpits. Most of the surface detail on the fuselage is also put on in replacement of what is provided (much of the original being ob;iterated in the course of building the thing). Cabane struts are also scratch-built, as are the Holt flare-holders. Wheels are from the spares box, originally from a Smer Dewoitine 510.











Very good, a vast improvement, and interesting scheme, n/t
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Joined: September 9th, 2004, 3:43 am

May 14th, 2012, 2:18 am #6

Even if half of it has been replaced!
I am still glad Airfix put the thing out. The new limited run kits I have seen really are not much of an improvement, juts differently flawed. A shame, really, because the Hart family is one of the high points of the 'Golden Age', and deserves better.
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Joined: September 9th, 2004, 3:43 am

May 14th, 2012, 2:35 am #7

Good to see you back Old Man

Nice work on that classic kit - especially the oil cooler - I have obtained an Aeroclub Hart/Audax kit and the masterplan is to do some cross kitting with my Airfix Demon... something I have in mind for the Interwar GB after the summer... but probably I will end up with few Airfix bits

Hope to see more work from you - I hope to finish the Pinto on the 1/72 forum soon, then I hope to do another biplane, don't know yet what - got a few options and my mind keeps changing all the time

* <i></i> * *
William De Coster / Belgium / Plastic Stories

1/72 - Special Hobby - TT-1 Pinto : Part I (incl Panthers Cup 2012 show report)
1/72 - Airfix/Jo-Han - Mitsubishi Zero/Rufe conversion: Part I
1/72 - Airfix - Hawker Hurricane Mk.I : Part I - Part II - Part III - Part IV /end (incl. Model Force 2012 show report)

Just like the perfect woman doesn't exist, I will never build a perfect model.
Puts me on a par with God
I got a bit un-well last December, nothing serious, mind, but it put me off my feed a bit.

The oil-cooler looks trickier than it is. The trick is to make one piece in heavier plastic that is a master, with the holes pierced in it, and of the proper width. The holes have to be spaced right, and it has to be the right width, but the piece can be way over-length. Duplicate this in the same heavier plastic, and glue lengths of rod in the holes. Cut a strip of 5 thousandths sheet the right width, line up with the master and piece the holes with a stout needle. Again, leave them over-length. Check them, and stack them, on the piece with the rods. When you start gluing them, use a strip of five thousandths to keep them separate. Once everything is fixed, file them down to then right lengths on either side of the rods.

I recently got an old Aeroclub Osprey I hope to get to before too long. Where is there an inter-war group build coming up?
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Joined: September 9th, 2004, 3:43 am

May 14th, 2012, 2:37 am #8

I saw it previously on the other forum, and it still looks fab!

Regards,
Adrian
I thought it might be appropriate here. I have many fond memories of the old Airfix kits, and am looking forward to doing some of their new ones.
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Joined: September 9th, 2004, 3:43 am

May 14th, 2012, 2:40 am #9

Very good, a vast improvement, and interesting scheme, n/t
I would like sometime to see the original Airfix Hart. I gather the wings were better in the original, and were butchered when the molds were altered to produce the Demon kit.

I have some of the new AZ and A-Model Hart family kits, and wish they were better.
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Joined: February 26th, 2002, 4:32 am

May 14th, 2012, 6:28 am #10

nice and thin with none of that awful mountain range ribbing. One day I might rebuild both kits - I did them a long time ago.
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