Good article on the state of the hobby.

.

Good article on the state of the hobby.

Joined: February 27th, 2005, 2:45 am

April 11th, 2012, 4:57 pm #1

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Joined: January 17th, 2008, 12:33 am

April 11th, 2012, 5:01 pm #2



The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.
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Joined: November 21st, 2011, 10:30 pm

April 11th, 2012, 5:09 pm #3

as some here want to believe. Just a quote from that article stating the "average age":

"As I mentioned above, kit sales started declining over a decade ago simply because the average age of modelers was increasing and demand was dropping. Today, the average age hasnt improved, and now the economy over the last few years has also taken its toll on demand."

Cant argue with fact. As mentioned yesterday, the young are not going to carry the modeling torch after we pass on like some here think. Seems like I am not the only one in agreement. Just ask your grandson's if they are at the comprehensible age if they would like to build a model from A-Z with you.

It is too bad for the hobby.
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 2:45 pm

April 11th, 2012, 5:48 pm #4

...I lived in a town with a population of 10,000. There were at least a dozen stores in town that I could buy a model at, and have some kind of selection. One was a dedicated hobby shop, and one was a toy store with a good selection. Two were Sprouse-Reitz stores. Ace hardware.

K-Mart had a whole aisle of models. I saw Hasegawa kits at Fred Meyer. Every drug store had models. And most of the stores had Testors and/or Pactra paint.

Now, a city of 100,000 probably has nothing. The Sea-Tac metro area, population 4,000,000, has Skyway hobbies and a couple Hobbytowns. A typical department store has probably four car kits and two airplanes to choose from.

I remember as a 16 year old kid, I was the youngest member of the model club. I'm 47 now, and I'm still one of the youngest.

Todd Enlund

"Bandits at 3 O'Clock"
"Roger. What should I do 'till then?"
Todd Enlund

"Bandits at three o'clock."
"Roger. What should I do 'till then?"
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Joined: July 5th, 2005, 5:46 am

April 11th, 2012, 5:57 pm #5

I wrote this about a week ago. Maybe his doom & gloom is because he focuses on aircraft so much?
Tracy White
Researcher At Large
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Joined: February 15th, 2009, 5:46 am

April 11th, 2012, 5:58 pm #6

as some here want to believe. Just a quote from that article stating the "average age":

"As I mentioned above, kit sales started declining over a decade ago simply because the average age of modelers was increasing and demand was dropping. Today, the average age hasnt improved, and now the economy over the last few years has also taken its toll on demand."

Cant argue with fact. As mentioned yesterday, the young are not going to carry the modeling torch after we pass on like some here think. Seems like I am not the only one in agreement. Just ask your grandson's if they are at the comprehensible age if they would like to build a model from A-Z with you.

It is too bad for the hobby.
Plastic modelling will remain a viable hobby for years to come.  Plenty of kids and young adults are taking it up with wargaming and sci-fi modelling leading the way.  WWII airplane modeling might not be what it once was, but the hobby of building plastic models isn't going anywhere anytime soon.  We could see a little bit of a resurgance as retiring baby-boomers with more free-time (though most retirees would say they get less free-time post-retirement) might take up a hobby, and the current generation of young Iraq and Afganistan vets appear to show a lot of interest in modelling (veterans have often made up a large segment of modelers).   It's definitely not an industry on its deathbed by any stretch.   It isn't the halcyon days of the 1990's or 1960's, either, but it ain't dead.       
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 3:08 pm

April 11th, 2012, 6:08 pm #7

as some here want to believe. Just a quote from that article stating the "average age":

"As I mentioned above, kit sales started declining over a decade ago simply because the average age of modelers was increasing and demand was dropping. Today, the average age hasnt improved, and now the economy over the last few years has also taken its toll on demand."

Cant argue with fact. As mentioned yesterday, the young are not going to carry the modeling torch after we pass on like some here think. Seems like I am not the only one in agreement. Just ask your grandson's if they are at the comprehensible age if they would like to build a model from A-Z with you.

It is too bad for the hobby.
here we go agian...another 'The Hobby Is Dying' thread...n/t
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Joined: January 27th, 2004, 5:18 pm

April 11th, 2012, 6:10 pm #8

Plastic modelling will remain a viable hobby for years to come.  Plenty of kids and young adults are taking it up with wargaming and sci-fi modelling leading the way.  WWII airplane modeling might not be what it once was, but the hobby of building plastic models isn't going anywhere anytime soon.  We could see a little bit of a resurgance as retiring baby-boomers with more free-time (though most retirees would say they get less free-time post-retirement) might take up a hobby, and the current generation of young Iraq and Afganistan vets appear to show a lot of interest in modelling (veterans have often made up a large segment of modelers).   It's definitely not an industry on its deathbed by any stretch.   It isn't the halcyon days of the 1990's or 1960's, either, but it ain't dead.       
The overall customer base is shrinking... this is pretty much a given. However, the target markets have become more demanding, and manufacturers are responding to those demands with increased diversity of subject matter, delivered to market more quickly thanks to advanced technologies such as online collaboration for everything from research to marketing and CAD use in kit development.

So yes, it's not dying- far from it. It is changing though, and I think the argument can be made that it has changed for the better, particularly from the consumer's point of view. The challenge is to find ways to attract interest to the hobby, and to help stem the outflow of hobby participants, whether they be newcomers or long-time lurkers who tinker with kits but might not realize there's a lot of folks like them out here.

Lynn

"History is not 'was', it 'is'." - William Faulkner
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Joined: November 21st, 2011, 10:30 pm

April 11th, 2012, 6:10 pm #9

...I lived in a town with a population of 10,000. There were at least a dozen stores in town that I could buy a model at, and have some kind of selection. One was a dedicated hobby shop, and one was a toy store with a good selection. Two were Sprouse-Reitz stores. Ace hardware.

K-Mart had a whole aisle of models. I saw Hasegawa kits at Fred Meyer. Every drug store had models. And most of the stores had Testors and/or Pactra paint.

Now, a city of 100,000 probably has nothing. The Sea-Tac metro area, population 4,000,000, has Skyway hobbies and a couple Hobbytowns. A typical department store has probably four car kits and two airplanes to choose from.

I remember as a 16 year old kid, I was the youngest member of the model club. I'm 47 now, and I'm still one of the youngest.

Todd Enlund

"Bandits at 3 O'Clock"
"Roger. What should I do 'till then?"
I am 52 and feel like I am the last of what once was.
We had Woolworth, Kresge, Sears, K-mart, D&C dept store, who all had an isle dedicated to just models.
Today the best comparison to that long lost age is Michael's and that pales in comparison.
How big is the model section at Target?? Oh,then how about Walmart?, No? Oh then it must be Miejer. Not there either?? Ok, how about Walgreen, or RiteAid, or CVS drugstores?? Still no?? Why not? back in the 70's Cunningham drugs, Revco drugs, and one other used to sell them. Not many but they did.
Those stores are just a memory now unfortunately.
And I grew up in Detroit where the population was 2 million back then. Today it is under 875,000 and I am sure that 2/3rds of the residents still living there do not even know how to spell Revell, Monogram, or Tamiya but they do know how to run from "Police", "Crackheads" and "Car Jackers". And these are the young that are supposed to take up our slack in modeling after we pass on??
Hum...............
Regards,
Larry
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Joined: November 21st, 2011, 10:30 pm

April 11th, 2012, 6:17 pm #10

here we go agian...another 'The Hobby Is Dying' thread...n/t
a topic that will always pop up and there are guys who are on each side.
True, there is no need to continue here as there was a nasty posting in the Lounge a few days ago.
OK. I hear you. Let's let it go.
Regards,
Larry
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