F-102 walk around book by Squadron/Signal

F-102 walk around book by Squadron/Signal

Joined: March 10th, 2010, 7:44 pm

May 27th, 2011, 5:14 pm #1

Several weeks ago I was quite excited to see this book for sale on Ebay and bought it with out hesitation. Very, very bad mistake. Far as I'm concerned, this thing is a
major P.O.S. You're better off searching the web for detail shots or finding one on static display some where and taking your own photos. The majority (90%?)is filled with profiles of the aircraft in different squadron markings. The author shows a photo of a F-102A on display at a museum with the missile bay open but there's only one partial shot of the bay. Nothing of the radar system in the nose, area behind the ejection seat just to mention a couple places not covered by this "reference book". Add to this, very little about the AIM-4 missile. I was in Colorado 2 years ago and able to photograph one in its original shipping crate!
I had the opportunity to photograph a 2 seater MiG-21 (with both ejection seats & gun sight removed from the aircraft) about 10 years ago and took approximately 400 photos. If I could stick my camera in some place, there it went. This included photos of all the stenciling/data plates inside the gear wells, landing gear, etc.
So how come the author couldn't get permission from one of the museums to get all the detail shots needed? Wouldn't he just need a letter from Squadron/Signal stating he was doing a book on the F-102 to show to the museum?
Why am I so bummed out about this book? Our father worked on them while we were stationed at Bitburg in the late 50's and it his his favorite airplane. Add to the fact I paid $20 total for this thing. If it had gone for maybe $10, I wouldn't be so bummed out.
For those interested, I have a scanner coming to me via Ebay and hope to show the AIM-4 photos.
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Joined: March 7th, 2005, 2:24 am

May 27th, 2011, 5:33 pm #2

Well it's true that some of their stuff is subpar in accuracy and photo quality I believe that the detail level you are looking for is handled by their 'Walkaround" series (which contains little in the way of operational history), the long standing "In Action" line has always been about (mainly) the development & service history of the subject with a bit of detail thrown in here and their. I always liked Detail & Scale better since they were able to blend the two levels of coverage, keeping in mind they too have had their share of less-than-impressive work.

That's all I'm saying'

BW
DEATH to anything 72nd scale, LuftCrap-ola, Cars, and Anime!
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Joined: August 18th, 2004, 6:37 pm

May 27th, 2011, 5:54 pm #3

Several weeks ago I was quite excited to see this book for sale on Ebay and bought it with out hesitation. Very, very bad mistake. Far as I'm concerned, this thing is a
major P.O.S. You're better off searching the web for detail shots or finding one on static display some where and taking your own photos. The majority (90%?)is filled with profiles of the aircraft in different squadron markings. The author shows a photo of a F-102A on display at a museum with the missile bay open but there's only one partial shot of the bay. Nothing of the radar system in the nose, area behind the ejection seat just to mention a couple places not covered by this "reference book". Add to this, very little about the AIM-4 missile. I was in Colorado 2 years ago and able to photograph one in its original shipping crate!
I had the opportunity to photograph a 2 seater MiG-21 (with both ejection seats & gun sight removed from the aircraft) about 10 years ago and took approximately 400 photos. If I could stick my camera in some place, there it went. This included photos of all the stenciling/data plates inside the gear wells, landing gear, etc.
So how come the author couldn't get permission from one of the museums to get all the detail shots needed? Wouldn't he just need a letter from Squadron/Signal stating he was doing a book on the F-102 to show to the museum?
Why am I so bummed out about this book? Our father worked on them while we were stationed at Bitburg in the late 50's and it his his favorite airplane. Add to the fact I paid $20 total for this thing. If it had gone for maybe $10, I wouldn't be so bummed out.
For those interested, I have a scanner coming to me via Ebay and hope to show the AIM-4 photos.
A major disappointment. If the Deuce book is the same, then many items are incorrectly identified.

The AIM-4 is an interesting missile, since it was carried by so many aircraft. And I'll be willing to bet the one you mentioned in the crate is the one on display in Pueblo.



CB

http://www.angelfire.com/dc/jinxx1/Desrt_Wings.html
Clifford Bossie

http://www.angelfire.com/dc/jinxx1/Desrt_Wings.html

http://www.angelfire.com/dc/jinxx1/Wildcat/F4F_pt1.html
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Joined: August 12th, 2004, 3:14 pm

May 27th, 2011, 8:56 pm #4

Several weeks ago I was quite excited to see this book for sale on Ebay and bought it with out hesitation. Very, very bad mistake. Far as I'm concerned, this thing is a
major P.O.S. You're better off searching the web for detail shots or finding one on static display some where and taking your own photos. The majority (90%?)is filled with profiles of the aircraft in different squadron markings. The author shows a photo of a F-102A on display at a museum with the missile bay open but there's only one partial shot of the bay. Nothing of the radar system in the nose, area behind the ejection seat just to mention a couple places not covered by this "reference book". Add to this, very little about the AIM-4 missile. I was in Colorado 2 years ago and able to photograph one in its original shipping crate!
I had the opportunity to photograph a 2 seater MiG-21 (with both ejection seats & gun sight removed from the aircraft) about 10 years ago and took approximately 400 photos. If I could stick my camera in some place, there it went. This included photos of all the stenciling/data plates inside the gear wells, landing gear, etc.
So how come the author couldn't get permission from one of the museums to get all the detail shots needed? Wouldn't he just need a letter from Squadron/Signal stating he was doing a book on the F-102 to show to the museum?
Why am I so bummed out about this book? Our father worked on them while we were stationed at Bitburg in the late 50's and it his his favorite airplane. Add to the fact I paid $20 total for this thing. If it had gone for maybe $10, I wouldn't be so bummed out.
For those interested, I have a scanner coming to me via Ebay and hope to show the AIM-4 photos.
Asking if people had photos to let them know/send them in. So if book comes out and people dont like the photos... ?

But I have noticed recent books are sub par compared to older ones. I buy a lot of their armor books and some are really bad. Their new Sherman book seems good but their Sherman Walk Around is poor, as is their Halftrack walk around.
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Joined: March 6th, 2005, 7:44 am

May 27th, 2011, 9:19 pm #5

Several weeks ago I was quite excited to see this book for sale on Ebay and bought it with out hesitation. Very, very bad mistake. Far as I'm concerned, this thing is a
major P.O.S. You're better off searching the web for detail shots or finding one on static display some where and taking your own photos. The majority (90%?)is filled with profiles of the aircraft in different squadron markings. The author shows a photo of a F-102A on display at a museum with the missile bay open but there's only one partial shot of the bay. Nothing of the radar system in the nose, area behind the ejection seat just to mention a couple places not covered by this "reference book". Add to this, very little about the AIM-4 missile. I was in Colorado 2 years ago and able to photograph one in its original shipping crate!
I had the opportunity to photograph a 2 seater MiG-21 (with both ejection seats & gun sight removed from the aircraft) about 10 years ago and took approximately 400 photos. If I could stick my camera in some place, there it went. This included photos of all the stenciling/data plates inside the gear wells, landing gear, etc.
So how come the author couldn't get permission from one of the museums to get all the detail shots needed? Wouldn't he just need a letter from Squadron/Signal stating he was doing a book on the F-102 to show to the museum?
Why am I so bummed out about this book? Our father worked on them while we were stationed at Bitburg in the late 50's and it his his favorite airplane. Add to the fact I paid $20 total for this thing. If it had gone for maybe $10, I wouldn't be so bummed out.
For those interested, I have a scanner coming to me via Ebay and hope to show the AIM-4 photos.
The Squadron F-84 and F-102 walkarounds have the same author (Ken Neubeck), and that's the reason they are poorly done...his F-111 walkaround is the same weak effort. His books are full of inaccuracies, and the pix captions contain many errors.
Many of his pix are from museum aircraft that are in poor condition, and do not represent the aircraft as seen during operational life.

I will not buy another product with his name on it.
Last edited by 66018 on May 27th, 2011, 9:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: February 14th, 2006, 4:50 pm

May 27th, 2011, 11:28 pm #6

Several weeks ago I was quite excited to see this book for sale on Ebay and bought it with out hesitation. Very, very bad mistake. Far as I'm concerned, this thing is a
major P.O.S. You're better off searching the web for detail shots or finding one on static display some where and taking your own photos. The majority (90%?)is filled with profiles of the aircraft in different squadron markings. The author shows a photo of a F-102A on display at a museum with the missile bay open but there's only one partial shot of the bay. Nothing of the radar system in the nose, area behind the ejection seat just to mention a couple places not covered by this "reference book". Add to this, very little about the AIM-4 missile. I was in Colorado 2 years ago and able to photograph one in its original shipping crate!
I had the opportunity to photograph a 2 seater MiG-21 (with both ejection seats & gun sight removed from the aircraft) about 10 years ago and took approximately 400 photos. If I could stick my camera in some place, there it went. This included photos of all the stenciling/data plates inside the gear wells, landing gear, etc.
So how come the author couldn't get permission from one of the museums to get all the detail shots needed? Wouldn't he just need a letter from Squadron/Signal stating he was doing a book on the F-102 to show to the museum?
Why am I so bummed out about this book? Our father worked on them while we were stationed at Bitburg in the late 50's and it his his favorite airplane. Add to the fact I paid $20 total for this thing. If it had gone for maybe $10, I wouldn't be so bummed out.
For those interested, I have a scanner coming to me via Ebay and hope to show the AIM-4 photos.
I recieved the author's F-84 walkaround book as a gift. It has a number of head-scratching goofs and/or simply useless captions. Squadron needs a competent editor for these things.

Con-firmed! It's a cruel world, Herr Hauptman. You said so yourself.
--Bruno Stachel
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 12:53 am

May 28th, 2011, 6:59 pm #7

Several weeks ago I was quite excited to see this book for sale on Ebay and bought it with out hesitation. Very, very bad mistake. Far as I'm concerned, this thing is a
major P.O.S. You're better off searching the web for detail shots or finding one on static display some where and taking your own photos. The majority (90%?)is filled with profiles of the aircraft in different squadron markings. The author shows a photo of a F-102A on display at a museum with the missile bay open but there's only one partial shot of the bay. Nothing of the radar system in the nose, area behind the ejection seat just to mention a couple places not covered by this "reference book". Add to this, very little about the AIM-4 missile. I was in Colorado 2 years ago and able to photograph one in its original shipping crate!
I had the opportunity to photograph a 2 seater MiG-21 (with both ejection seats & gun sight removed from the aircraft) about 10 years ago and took approximately 400 photos. If I could stick my camera in some place, there it went. This included photos of all the stenciling/data plates inside the gear wells, landing gear, etc.
So how come the author couldn't get permission from one of the museums to get all the detail shots needed? Wouldn't he just need a letter from Squadron/Signal stating he was doing a book on the F-102 to show to the museum?
Why am I so bummed out about this book? Our father worked on them while we were stationed at Bitburg in the late 50's and it his his favorite airplane. Add to the fact I paid $20 total for this thing. If it had gone for maybe $10, I wouldn't be so bummed out.
For those interested, I have a scanner coming to me via Ebay and hope to show the AIM-4 photos.
The gist of it was that Squadron would see which hot new kits were coming out in the future and then get a book out in response. Then you will also see Aeromaster/Eagle Strike decal sheets come out with the same subjects. The time from concept to release was a matter of weeks, not months. The result is the slap dash that you see today. Its a good idea marketing-wise but I have to believe in the long run the reputation of these books will result in lower sales overall. I really miss Bert Kinsey's efforts with Detail and Scale.

Tank: So what do you need? Besides a miracle.
Neo: Guns. Lots of guns.
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Joined: March 9th, 2005, 12:38 am

May 29th, 2011, 1:13 am #8

Several weeks ago I was quite excited to see this book for sale on Ebay and bought it with out hesitation. Very, very bad mistake. Far as I'm concerned, this thing is a
major P.O.S. You're better off searching the web for detail shots or finding one on static display some where and taking your own photos. The majority (90%?)is filled with profiles of the aircraft in different squadron markings. The author shows a photo of a F-102A on display at a museum with the missile bay open but there's only one partial shot of the bay. Nothing of the radar system in the nose, area behind the ejection seat just to mention a couple places not covered by this "reference book". Add to this, very little about the AIM-4 missile. I was in Colorado 2 years ago and able to photograph one in its original shipping crate!
I had the opportunity to photograph a 2 seater MiG-21 (with both ejection seats & gun sight removed from the aircraft) about 10 years ago and took approximately 400 photos. If I could stick my camera in some place, there it went. This included photos of all the stenciling/data plates inside the gear wells, landing gear, etc.
So how come the author couldn't get permission from one of the museums to get all the detail shots needed? Wouldn't he just need a letter from Squadron/Signal stating he was doing a book on the F-102 to show to the museum?
Why am I so bummed out about this book? Our father worked on them while we were stationed at Bitburg in the late 50's and it his his favorite airplane. Add to the fact I paid $20 total for this thing. If it had gone for maybe $10, I wouldn't be so bummed out.
For those interested, I have a scanner coming to me via Ebay and hope to show the AIM-4 photos.
I've heard bad things about this book - a nice review might help influence buying decisions...

It is a bummer - its existence makes a GOOD book on the F-102 (beyond the old Detail & Scale book) less likely. It's like when Italeri flooded the shops with $7 1:72 F4U-5/AU-1/F4U-7/F4U-4 kits that were extremely poor, thus killing the chances of a good one coming out for a long while...

--Chris (http://obscureco.wordpress.com)
Duh-jà vu: When people write about stuff like it's new, but for years we've all known it's fact. --Chris Hoff
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Joined: October 8th, 2005, 11:22 am

May 29th, 2011, 11:35 am #9

The Squadron F-84 and F-102 walkarounds have the same author (Ken Neubeck), and that's the reason they are poorly done...his F-111 walkaround is the same weak effort. His books are full of inaccuracies, and the pix captions contain many errors.
Many of his pix are from museum aircraft that are in poor condition, and do not represent the aircraft as seen during operational life.

I will not buy another product with his name on it.
Mr Neubeck is not an aviation person, reading the captions in the F-84f book,

page 7 - Lower right - Gunports are "oblong...in order to meet aerodynamic airflow in front of the nose of the aircraft"

page 9 = Left - the nose intake is for air cooling the engine

page 9 - Right - Splitter plate is described as a "hinge assembly"

page 11 - Nose wheel fender is to protect the tire from damage

page 35 - lower right - Canopy rear window serves no purpose

page 38 - Lower left - Green light at wingtip is a landing light
- Lower right - Position of nose gear in relation to main gear (don't tell me, let me guess, in the middle?)

page 40 - lower left - aileron flap(?)

page 50 - J-65 is described as a turbofan

page 55 - Lower right - More landing lights on the rear of the tail (I do not want to be in a plane Mr Neubeck is try to land)

page 60 - Right - getting better, the nose inlet chambers supplies ram air to the engines.

page 73 - Blow in door is described as for engine cooling
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Joined: April 21st, 2005, 4:12 pm

May 29th, 2011, 5:11 pm #10

Several weeks ago I was quite excited to see this book for sale on Ebay and bought it with out hesitation. Very, very bad mistake. Far as I'm concerned, this thing is a
major P.O.S. You're better off searching the web for detail shots or finding one on static display some where and taking your own photos. The majority (90%?)is filled with profiles of the aircraft in different squadron markings. The author shows a photo of a F-102A on display at a museum with the missile bay open but there's only one partial shot of the bay. Nothing of the radar system in the nose, area behind the ejection seat just to mention a couple places not covered by this "reference book". Add to this, very little about the AIM-4 missile. I was in Colorado 2 years ago and able to photograph one in its original shipping crate!
I had the opportunity to photograph a 2 seater MiG-21 (with both ejection seats & gun sight removed from the aircraft) about 10 years ago and took approximately 400 photos. If I could stick my camera in some place, there it went. This included photos of all the stenciling/data plates inside the gear wells, landing gear, etc.
So how come the author couldn't get permission from one of the museums to get all the detail shots needed? Wouldn't he just need a letter from Squadron/Signal stating he was doing a book on the F-102 to show to the museum?
Why am I so bummed out about this book? Our father worked on them while we were stationed at Bitburg in the late 50's and it his his favorite airplane. Add to the fact I paid $20 total for this thing. If it had gone for maybe $10, I wouldn't be so bummed out.
For those interested, I have a scanner coming to me via Ebay and hope to show the AIM-4 photos.
They have always had a few mis-captioned photos, but it seems to be getting worse and they don't appreciate correction. Some of their authors do books on planes, armor and ships and I doubt anyone has that much knowledge. Apparently Squadron has never heard of proofreaders. That being said, some of their books are very good.
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