Eduard Albatros D.III OEFFAG 253 1/48

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Eduard Albatros D.III OEFFAG 253 1/48

Joined: October 17th, 2005, 11:03 pm

July 30th, 2012, 1:53 am #1

Here is the Eduard kit # 8241 that Brett from Roll Models sent me a couple of years ago. I wanted to do a Polish version flown by American pilots of the Kosciuszko Squadron in 1919-1920. Although this kit is marked as a 153 version, it also has all of the parts to do the 253 version in the box. The Polish used the 253 version so step one was to download the 253 instructions from the Eduard website. I had already procured two sheets of decals from Mike Grant, the Austro-Hungarian sworl fabric, and Polish D.III (Oef). This sheet had the hard to find Kosciuszko squadron insignia. With the kit and decals in hand, the next step was to find a source for spoked wheels in 1/48 scale. More on that later.
My first step was to use 400 grit wet/dry paper to sand down the ribs that look a little over donee and thick to me. Next I was able to paint the wings a clear doped linen cover and pencil in the ribs with a sepia colored marker. then a couple of light coats of clear doped linen hid the ribs slightly. the decals were applied as seen in the photos.
next I assembled the interior, and painted it with a sand colored acrylic paint. then I used my normal wood method by applying a wash of burnt sienna oil paint. let it flow to look like wood grain and settle around the internal ribs. Once all the internal details and engine were added I closed up the fuselage. The main fault of the kit is the lower wing to fuselage attachment, there is a very small tab on the wing and a small slot in the fuselage that is less than 1/16" deep. Even after scraping the paint out of the slot and off of the wing tab I could not get a satisfactory joint, I ended up drilling and pinning the joint, but still had troubles getting the wing to stay attached to the fuselage. I would have recommended eduard to use the same size tab and slot that they used on the tailplane that fit perfectly in place and lead to a very strong joint.
I painted the forward fuselage and engine cover white, then red, masked off the chevron on the nose and sprayed it with Model Master Green Drab, this is a good color for the Polish green. I gave all the parts a coat of Future clear then applied the decals. A final coat of Model Master semi-gloss lacquer gave me the desired finish. Before adding the upper wings I glued the cabine struts to the fuselage at the correct angle, and the V struts to the upper wing. Then I drilled a bunch of holes in the wings and fuselages to add turnbuckles. I used twisted wire turnbuckles called Bob's Buckles. I made a jig from lego blocks and a cardboard template to get the lower wings aligned correctly. Then I was able to add the upper wing, using super glue to attach the V strut to the lower wing and the cabines to the upper wing. For the rigging I used some silver fly tying thread and also some dark gray e-z line, which is an elastic thread. I added the exhaust pipes and dusted them with rusty pastelles and some black soot around the end of the stacks and on the surrounding fuselage.
To finish it up I added a wooden propeller from Marty Digmayer and the crowning jewel was my scratchbuilt wire wheels. I used the Harry Woodman method of a plastic jig, .003 fishing line woven through a center hub, and sandwiched between two plastic rings sanded flat on the mating surface. As you can see by the attached photos I think this method worked much better than using photoetched spokes.
Dave Calhoun















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Joined: March 21st, 2009, 1:23 am

July 30th, 2012, 2:50 am #2

Beautiful work. Great job!
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Joined: July 8th, 2008, 10:57 am

July 30th, 2012, 2:56 am #3

Here is the Eduard kit # 8241 that Brett from Roll Models sent me a couple of years ago. I wanted to do a Polish version flown by American pilots of the Kosciuszko Squadron in 1919-1920. Although this kit is marked as a 153 version, it also has all of the parts to do the 253 version in the box. The Polish used the 253 version so step one was to download the 253 instructions from the Eduard website. I had already procured two sheets of decals from Mike Grant, the Austro-Hungarian sworl fabric, and Polish D.III (Oef). This sheet had the hard to find Kosciuszko squadron insignia. With the kit and decals in hand, the next step was to find a source for spoked wheels in 1/48 scale. More on that later.
My first step was to use 400 grit wet/dry paper to sand down the ribs that look a little over donee and thick to me. Next I was able to paint the wings a clear doped linen cover and pencil in the ribs with a sepia colored marker. then a couple of light coats of clear doped linen hid the ribs slightly. the decals were applied as seen in the photos.
next I assembled the interior, and painted it with a sand colored acrylic paint. then I used my normal wood method by applying a wash of burnt sienna oil paint. let it flow to look like wood grain and settle around the internal ribs. Once all the internal details and engine were added I closed up the fuselage. The main fault of the kit is the lower wing to fuselage attachment, there is a very small tab on the wing and a small slot in the fuselage that is less than 1/16" deep. Even after scraping the paint out of the slot and off of the wing tab I could not get a satisfactory joint, I ended up drilling and pinning the joint, but still had troubles getting the wing to stay attached to the fuselage. I would have recommended eduard to use the same size tab and slot that they used on the tailplane that fit perfectly in place and lead to a very strong joint.
I painted the forward fuselage and engine cover white, then red, masked off the chevron on the nose and sprayed it with Model Master Green Drab, this is a good color for the Polish green. I gave all the parts a coat of Future clear then applied the decals. A final coat of Model Master semi-gloss lacquer gave me the desired finish. Before adding the upper wings I glued the cabine struts to the fuselage at the correct angle, and the V struts to the upper wing. Then I drilled a bunch of holes in the wings and fuselages to add turnbuckles. I used twisted wire turnbuckles called Bob's Buckles. I made a jig from lego blocks and a cardboard template to get the lower wings aligned correctly. Then I was able to add the upper wing, using super glue to attach the V strut to the lower wing and the cabines to the upper wing. For the rigging I used some silver fly tying thread and also some dark gray e-z line, which is an elastic thread. I added the exhaust pipes and dusted them with rusty pastelles and some black soot around the end of the stacks and on the surrounding fuselage.
To finish it up I added a wooden propeller from Marty Digmayer and the crowning jewel was my scratchbuilt wire wheels. I used the Harry Woodman method of a plastic jig, .003 fishing line woven through a center hub, and sandwiched between two plastic rings sanded flat on the mating surface. As you can see by the attached photos I think this method worked much better than using photoetched spokes.
Dave Calhoun














Bravo!

Stuart
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Joined: March 6th, 2005, 3:23 am

July 30th, 2012, 5:47 am #4

Here is the Eduard kit # 8241 that Brett from Roll Models sent me a couple of years ago. I wanted to do a Polish version flown by American pilots of the Kosciuszko Squadron in 1919-1920. Although this kit is marked as a 153 version, it also has all of the parts to do the 253 version in the box. The Polish used the 253 version so step one was to download the 253 instructions from the Eduard website. I had already procured two sheets of decals from Mike Grant, the Austro-Hungarian sworl fabric, and Polish D.III (Oef). This sheet had the hard to find Kosciuszko squadron insignia. With the kit and decals in hand, the next step was to find a source for spoked wheels in 1/48 scale. More on that later.
My first step was to use 400 grit wet/dry paper to sand down the ribs that look a little over donee and thick to me. Next I was able to paint the wings a clear doped linen cover and pencil in the ribs with a sepia colored marker. then a couple of light coats of clear doped linen hid the ribs slightly. the decals were applied as seen in the photos.
next I assembled the interior, and painted it with a sand colored acrylic paint. then I used my normal wood method by applying a wash of burnt sienna oil paint. let it flow to look like wood grain and settle around the internal ribs. Once all the internal details and engine were added I closed up the fuselage. The main fault of the kit is the lower wing to fuselage attachment, there is a very small tab on the wing and a small slot in the fuselage that is less than 1/16" deep. Even after scraping the paint out of the slot and off of the wing tab I could not get a satisfactory joint, I ended up drilling and pinning the joint, but still had troubles getting the wing to stay attached to the fuselage. I would have recommended eduard to use the same size tab and slot that they used on the tailplane that fit perfectly in place and lead to a very strong joint.
I painted the forward fuselage and engine cover white, then red, masked off the chevron on the nose and sprayed it with Model Master Green Drab, this is a good color for the Polish green. I gave all the parts a coat of Future clear then applied the decals. A final coat of Model Master semi-gloss lacquer gave me the desired finish. Before adding the upper wings I glued the cabine struts to the fuselage at the correct angle, and the V struts to the upper wing. Then I drilled a bunch of holes in the wings and fuselages to add turnbuckles. I used twisted wire turnbuckles called Bob's Buckles. I made a jig from lego blocks and a cardboard template to get the lower wings aligned correctly. Then I was able to add the upper wing, using super glue to attach the V strut to the lower wing and the cabines to the upper wing. For the rigging I used some silver fly tying thread and also some dark gray e-z line, which is an elastic thread. I added the exhaust pipes and dusted them with rusty pastelles and some black soot around the end of the stacks and on the surrounding fuselage.
To finish it up I added a wooden propeller from Marty Digmayer and the crowning jewel was my scratchbuilt wire wheels. I used the Harry Woodman method of a plastic jig, .003 fishing line woven through a center hub, and sandwiched between two plastic rings sanded flat on the mating surface. As you can see by the attached photos I think this method worked much better than using photoetched spokes.
Dave Calhoun














nm
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Joined: August 20th, 2010, 11:34 am

July 30th, 2012, 7:20 am #5

Here is the Eduard kit # 8241 that Brett from Roll Models sent me a couple of years ago. I wanted to do a Polish version flown by American pilots of the Kosciuszko Squadron in 1919-1920. Although this kit is marked as a 153 version, it also has all of the parts to do the 253 version in the box. The Polish used the 253 version so step one was to download the 253 instructions from the Eduard website. I had already procured two sheets of decals from Mike Grant, the Austro-Hungarian sworl fabric, and Polish D.III (Oef). This sheet had the hard to find Kosciuszko squadron insignia. With the kit and decals in hand, the next step was to find a source for spoked wheels in 1/48 scale. More on that later.
My first step was to use 400 grit wet/dry paper to sand down the ribs that look a little over donee and thick to me. Next I was able to paint the wings a clear doped linen cover and pencil in the ribs with a sepia colored marker. then a couple of light coats of clear doped linen hid the ribs slightly. the decals were applied as seen in the photos.
next I assembled the interior, and painted it with a sand colored acrylic paint. then I used my normal wood method by applying a wash of burnt sienna oil paint. let it flow to look like wood grain and settle around the internal ribs. Once all the internal details and engine were added I closed up the fuselage. The main fault of the kit is the lower wing to fuselage attachment, there is a very small tab on the wing and a small slot in the fuselage that is less than 1/16" deep. Even after scraping the paint out of the slot and off of the wing tab I could not get a satisfactory joint, I ended up drilling and pinning the joint, but still had troubles getting the wing to stay attached to the fuselage. I would have recommended eduard to use the same size tab and slot that they used on the tailplane that fit perfectly in place and lead to a very strong joint.
I painted the forward fuselage and engine cover white, then red, masked off the chevron on the nose and sprayed it with Model Master Green Drab, this is a good color for the Polish green. I gave all the parts a coat of Future clear then applied the decals. A final coat of Model Master semi-gloss lacquer gave me the desired finish. Before adding the upper wings I glued the cabine struts to the fuselage at the correct angle, and the V struts to the upper wing. Then I drilled a bunch of holes in the wings and fuselages to add turnbuckles. I used twisted wire turnbuckles called Bob's Buckles. I made a jig from lego blocks and a cardboard template to get the lower wings aligned correctly. Then I was able to add the upper wing, using super glue to attach the V strut to the lower wing and the cabines to the upper wing. For the rigging I used some silver fly tying thread and also some dark gray e-z line, which is an elastic thread. I added the exhaust pipes and dusted them with rusty pastelles and some black soot around the end of the stacks and on the surrounding fuselage.
To finish it up I added a wooden propeller from Marty Digmayer and the crowning jewel was my scratchbuilt wire wheels. I used the Harry Woodman method of a plastic jig, .003 fishing line woven through a center hub, and sandwiched between two plastic rings sanded flat on the mating surface. As you can see by the attached photos I think this method worked much better than using photoetched spokes.
Dave Calhoun














an inspiration - terrific wheels and propeller and thanks for the step by step info. Well done , Dave.
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Joined: June 19th, 2007, 6:57 pm

July 30th, 2012, 9:17 am #6

Here is the Eduard kit # 8241 that Brett from Roll Models sent me a couple of years ago. I wanted to do a Polish version flown by American pilots of the Kosciuszko Squadron in 1919-1920. Although this kit is marked as a 153 version, it also has all of the parts to do the 253 version in the box. The Polish used the 253 version so step one was to download the 253 instructions from the Eduard website. I had already procured two sheets of decals from Mike Grant, the Austro-Hungarian sworl fabric, and Polish D.III (Oef). This sheet had the hard to find Kosciuszko squadron insignia. With the kit and decals in hand, the next step was to find a source for spoked wheels in 1/48 scale. More on that later.
My first step was to use 400 grit wet/dry paper to sand down the ribs that look a little over donee and thick to me. Next I was able to paint the wings a clear doped linen cover and pencil in the ribs with a sepia colored marker. then a couple of light coats of clear doped linen hid the ribs slightly. the decals were applied as seen in the photos.
next I assembled the interior, and painted it with a sand colored acrylic paint. then I used my normal wood method by applying a wash of burnt sienna oil paint. let it flow to look like wood grain and settle around the internal ribs. Once all the internal details and engine were added I closed up the fuselage. The main fault of the kit is the lower wing to fuselage attachment, there is a very small tab on the wing and a small slot in the fuselage that is less than 1/16" deep. Even after scraping the paint out of the slot and off of the wing tab I could not get a satisfactory joint, I ended up drilling and pinning the joint, but still had troubles getting the wing to stay attached to the fuselage. I would have recommended eduard to use the same size tab and slot that they used on the tailplane that fit perfectly in place and lead to a very strong joint.
I painted the forward fuselage and engine cover white, then red, masked off the chevron on the nose and sprayed it with Model Master Green Drab, this is a good color for the Polish green. I gave all the parts a coat of Future clear then applied the decals. A final coat of Model Master semi-gloss lacquer gave me the desired finish. Before adding the upper wings I glued the cabine struts to the fuselage at the correct angle, and the V struts to the upper wing. Then I drilled a bunch of holes in the wings and fuselages to add turnbuckles. I used twisted wire turnbuckles called Bob's Buckles. I made a jig from lego blocks and a cardboard template to get the lower wings aligned correctly. Then I was able to add the upper wing, using super glue to attach the V strut to the lower wing and the cabines to the upper wing. For the rigging I used some silver fly tying thread and also some dark gray e-z line, which is an elastic thread. I added the exhaust pipes and dusted them with rusty pastelles and some black soot around the end of the stacks and on the surrounding fuselage.
To finish it up I added a wooden propeller from Marty Digmayer and the crowning jewel was my scratchbuilt wire wheels. I used the Harry Woodman method of a plastic jig, .003 fishing line woven through a center hub, and sandwiched between two plastic rings sanded flat on the mating surface. As you can see by the attached photos I think this method worked much better than using photoetched spokes.
Dave Calhoun














That's a great colour scheme there
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Joined: February 28th, 2008, 5:58 pm

July 30th, 2012, 2:42 pm #7

Here is the Eduard kit # 8241 that Brett from Roll Models sent me a couple of years ago. I wanted to do a Polish version flown by American pilots of the Kosciuszko Squadron in 1919-1920. Although this kit is marked as a 153 version, it also has all of the parts to do the 253 version in the box. The Polish used the 253 version so step one was to download the 253 instructions from the Eduard website. I had already procured two sheets of decals from Mike Grant, the Austro-Hungarian sworl fabric, and Polish D.III (Oef). This sheet had the hard to find Kosciuszko squadron insignia. With the kit and decals in hand, the next step was to find a source for spoked wheels in 1/48 scale. More on that later.
My first step was to use 400 grit wet/dry paper to sand down the ribs that look a little over donee and thick to me. Next I was able to paint the wings a clear doped linen cover and pencil in the ribs with a sepia colored marker. then a couple of light coats of clear doped linen hid the ribs slightly. the decals were applied as seen in the photos.
next I assembled the interior, and painted it with a sand colored acrylic paint. then I used my normal wood method by applying a wash of burnt sienna oil paint. let it flow to look like wood grain and settle around the internal ribs. Once all the internal details and engine were added I closed up the fuselage. The main fault of the kit is the lower wing to fuselage attachment, there is a very small tab on the wing and a small slot in the fuselage that is less than 1/16" deep. Even after scraping the paint out of the slot and off of the wing tab I could not get a satisfactory joint, I ended up drilling and pinning the joint, but still had troubles getting the wing to stay attached to the fuselage. I would have recommended eduard to use the same size tab and slot that they used on the tailplane that fit perfectly in place and lead to a very strong joint.
I painted the forward fuselage and engine cover white, then red, masked off the chevron on the nose and sprayed it with Model Master Green Drab, this is a good color for the Polish green. I gave all the parts a coat of Future clear then applied the decals. A final coat of Model Master semi-gloss lacquer gave me the desired finish. Before adding the upper wings I glued the cabine struts to the fuselage at the correct angle, and the V struts to the upper wing. Then I drilled a bunch of holes in the wings and fuselages to add turnbuckles. I used twisted wire turnbuckles called Bob's Buckles. I made a jig from lego blocks and a cardboard template to get the lower wings aligned correctly. Then I was able to add the upper wing, using super glue to attach the V strut to the lower wing and the cabines to the upper wing. For the rigging I used some silver fly tying thread and also some dark gray e-z line, which is an elastic thread. I added the exhaust pipes and dusted them with rusty pastelles and some black soot around the end of the stacks and on the surrounding fuselage.
To finish it up I added a wooden propeller from Marty Digmayer and the crowning jewel was my scratchbuilt wire wheels. I used the Harry Woodman method of a plastic jig, .003 fishing line woven through a center hub, and sandwiched between two plastic rings sanded flat on the mating surface. As you can see by the attached photos I think this method worked much better than using photoetched spokes.
Dave Calhoun














...to anyone insane enough to scratch their own spoked wheels. Sweet job!

-Mark
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Joined: October 17th, 2005, 11:03 pm

July 30th, 2012, 10:51 pm #8

Thanks guys!
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Joined: October 25th, 2004, 1:51 pm

July 31st, 2012, 3:17 pm #9

Here is the Eduard kit # 8241 that Brett from Roll Models sent me a couple of years ago. I wanted to do a Polish version flown by American pilots of the Kosciuszko Squadron in 1919-1920. Although this kit is marked as a 153 version, it also has all of the parts to do the 253 version in the box. The Polish used the 253 version so step one was to download the 253 instructions from the Eduard website. I had already procured two sheets of decals from Mike Grant, the Austro-Hungarian sworl fabric, and Polish D.III (Oef). This sheet had the hard to find Kosciuszko squadron insignia. With the kit and decals in hand, the next step was to find a source for spoked wheels in 1/48 scale. More on that later.
My first step was to use 400 grit wet/dry paper to sand down the ribs that look a little over donee and thick to me. Next I was able to paint the wings a clear doped linen cover and pencil in the ribs with a sepia colored marker. then a couple of light coats of clear doped linen hid the ribs slightly. the decals were applied as seen in the photos.
next I assembled the interior, and painted it with a sand colored acrylic paint. then I used my normal wood method by applying a wash of burnt sienna oil paint. let it flow to look like wood grain and settle around the internal ribs. Once all the internal details and engine were added I closed up the fuselage. The main fault of the kit is the lower wing to fuselage attachment, there is a very small tab on the wing and a small slot in the fuselage that is less than 1/16" deep. Even after scraping the paint out of the slot and off of the wing tab I could not get a satisfactory joint, I ended up drilling and pinning the joint, but still had troubles getting the wing to stay attached to the fuselage. I would have recommended eduard to use the same size tab and slot that they used on the tailplane that fit perfectly in place and lead to a very strong joint.
I painted the forward fuselage and engine cover white, then red, masked off the chevron on the nose and sprayed it with Model Master Green Drab, this is a good color for the Polish green. I gave all the parts a coat of Future clear then applied the decals. A final coat of Model Master semi-gloss lacquer gave me the desired finish. Before adding the upper wings I glued the cabine struts to the fuselage at the correct angle, and the V struts to the upper wing. Then I drilled a bunch of holes in the wings and fuselages to add turnbuckles. I used twisted wire turnbuckles called Bob's Buckles. I made a jig from lego blocks and a cardboard template to get the lower wings aligned correctly. Then I was able to add the upper wing, using super glue to attach the V strut to the lower wing and the cabines to the upper wing. For the rigging I used some silver fly tying thread and also some dark gray e-z line, which is an elastic thread. I added the exhaust pipes and dusted them with rusty pastelles and some black soot around the end of the stacks and on the surrounding fuselage.
To finish it up I added a wooden propeller from Marty Digmayer and the crowning jewel was my scratchbuilt wire wheels. I used the Harry Woodman method of a plastic jig, .003 fishing line woven through a center hub, and sandwiched between two plastic rings sanded flat on the mating surface. As you can see by the attached photos I think this method worked much better than using photoetched spokes.
Dave Calhoun














Love the wheels!!!


Brandon



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Joined: April 20th, 2012, 12:14 pm

July 31st, 2012, 11:42 pm #10

Here is the Eduard kit # 8241 that Brett from Roll Models sent me a couple of years ago. I wanted to do a Polish version flown by American pilots of the Kosciuszko Squadron in 1919-1920. Although this kit is marked as a 153 version, it also has all of the parts to do the 253 version in the box. The Polish used the 253 version so step one was to download the 253 instructions from the Eduard website. I had already procured two sheets of decals from Mike Grant, the Austro-Hungarian sworl fabric, and Polish D.III (Oef). This sheet had the hard to find Kosciuszko squadron insignia. With the kit and decals in hand, the next step was to find a source for spoked wheels in 1/48 scale. More on that later.
My first step was to use 400 grit wet/dry paper to sand down the ribs that look a little over donee and thick to me. Next I was able to paint the wings a clear doped linen cover and pencil in the ribs with a sepia colored marker. then a couple of light coats of clear doped linen hid the ribs slightly. the decals were applied as seen in the photos.
next I assembled the interior, and painted it with a sand colored acrylic paint. then I used my normal wood method by applying a wash of burnt sienna oil paint. let it flow to look like wood grain and settle around the internal ribs. Once all the internal details and engine were added I closed up the fuselage. The main fault of the kit is the lower wing to fuselage attachment, there is a very small tab on the wing and a small slot in the fuselage that is less than 1/16" deep. Even after scraping the paint out of the slot and off of the wing tab I could not get a satisfactory joint, I ended up drilling and pinning the joint, but still had troubles getting the wing to stay attached to the fuselage. I would have recommended eduard to use the same size tab and slot that they used on the tailplane that fit perfectly in place and lead to a very strong joint.
I painted the forward fuselage and engine cover white, then red, masked off the chevron on the nose and sprayed it with Model Master Green Drab, this is a good color for the Polish green. I gave all the parts a coat of Future clear then applied the decals. A final coat of Model Master semi-gloss lacquer gave me the desired finish. Before adding the upper wings I glued the cabine struts to the fuselage at the correct angle, and the V struts to the upper wing. Then I drilled a bunch of holes in the wings and fuselages to add turnbuckles. I used twisted wire turnbuckles called Bob's Buckles. I made a jig from lego blocks and a cardboard template to get the lower wings aligned correctly. Then I was able to add the upper wing, using super glue to attach the V strut to the lower wing and the cabines to the upper wing. For the rigging I used some silver fly tying thread and also some dark gray e-z line, which is an elastic thread. I added the exhaust pipes and dusted them with rusty pastelles and some black soot around the end of the stacks and on the surrounding fuselage.
To finish it up I added a wooden propeller from Marty Digmayer and the crowning jewel was my scratchbuilt wire wheels. I used the Harry Woodman method of a plastic jig, .003 fishing line woven through a center hub, and sandwiched between two plastic rings sanded flat on the mating surface. As you can see by the attached photos I think this method worked much better than using photoetched spokes.
Dave Calhoun














Very excellent build, livery, and wheel spoke technique, thank you for sharing Dave.
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