Eduard 1/48 scale Messerschmitt Bf 109 E-1 Progress

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Eduard 1/48 scale Messerschmitt Bf 109 E-1 Progress

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 13th, 2012, 9:13 pm #1

Hi all,

I have been working on the new Eduard 1/48 scale Bf 109 E-1 over the last couple of days and I thought I would post a few progress photos.

The cockpit looks great with its colour photo-etched parts. Detail is to the same level as the 1/32 scale kit. Apart from the addition of a few Aeroscale cockpit placard decals, the cockpit is straight from the box.





I was painting on the weekend while the family was in the house, so I weathered with an acrylic Citadel "Devlan Mud" wash instead of the smelly oil-based washes that I would usually use. The acrylic wash was okay, but lacked some of the subtlety and smoother blending of an oil wash.





My original plan was to build this model with the engine cowling glued in place, but I was so impressed with the detail as I built up the engine block that I decided to display it on the finished model. I spent around an extra day painting the engine.





The engine is built straight from the box. Eduard supplies four sets of individual yellow stencil-style digits (0-9) for the engine serial number. I found a number of photos of DB 601 engines that appeared to have a bare metal top engine cover, so I decided this would add a bit of interest.

I also found photos of later engines with the engine model number painted on the top cover, so I thought I would apply a little artistic license and do the same with mine. The "601" and "A" decals were sourced from an old unlabelled sheet of serial numbers, which I think came from Fantasy Printshop. Hey, it reads "109" when it is is upside down - spooky!





The engineering and parts breakdown is essentially the same as the 1/32 scale kit but my impression so far is that the fit is slightly better. There are a few interesting changes to the engineering though, such as the three-piece tail wheel assembly trapped between the empennage halves and the new, more precise and robust method for securing the horseshoe oil cooler.

BTW, in my review last week I mentioned a sink mark on the rear cover for the instrument panel. In fact, it is not a sink mark - it is actually a moulded recess for the back of one of the cowl machine guns. I should have remembered this from the 1/32 scale kit!

The fit of the kit so far has been very impressive, although getting the assembled engine / firewall / gun deck assembly between the fuselage halves is a bit tricky. The exhausts actually hold the engine very securely and accurately in place by themselves, so next time I will probably attach the mounts to the engine but not glue them to the firewall. That way, the engine could be fitted first, and the firewall could be added later.

Along similar lines, I did not install the cockpit floor section until after the fuselage halves were joined. Once the fuselage was set, I simply pushed the cockpit floor up through the hole in the bottom of the fuselage and it clicked into place.





I also deviated from the instructions with the wing assembly. I glued the full-span lower wing to the fuselage and made sure the dihedral and general fit was set before adding the upper wing halves. Dihedral looks good, the upper parts sit down properly over the wheel well linings and there is no gap at the wing root.





I am really enjoying this build so far, and I look forward to starting the paint job later today.





Bye for now,

Brett



Brett Green - Editor
HyperScale
http://www.hyperscale.com
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Joined: May 11th, 2005, 5:33 pm

February 13th, 2012, 9:48 pm #2

What a strange blue colour of the instrument panel, and the panel on the starboard cockpit wall.

Sergey.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 13th, 2012, 9:52 pm #3

Hi Sergey,

It doesn't actually look that blue on the model. There is just a hint of blue in the very dark grey under regular light.

I assume that 1500 watts of studio flash units (plus .35 increase in exposure) is emphasising the blue tint.

Looking again at the photos, all the other blues are much brighter and lighter too. The RLM 02 looks about right though. Odd.

Thanks and bye for now,

Brett



Brett Green - Editor
HyperScale
http://www.hyperscale.com
Last edited by hyperscale on February 13th, 2012, 9:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: October 30th, 2005, 1:44 pm

February 13th, 2012, 9:58 pm #4

Hi all,

I have been working on the new Eduard 1/48 scale Bf 109 E-1 over the last couple of days and I thought I would post a few progress photos.

The cockpit looks great with its colour photo-etched parts. Detail is to the same level as the 1/32 scale kit. Apart from the addition of a few Aeroscale cockpit placard decals, the cockpit is straight from the box.





I was painting on the weekend while the family was in the house, so I weathered with an acrylic Citadel "Devlan Mud" wash instead of the smelly oil-based washes that I would usually use. The acrylic wash was okay, but lacked some of the subtlety and smoother blending of an oil wash.





My original plan was to build this model with the engine cowling glued in place, but I was so impressed with the detail as I built up the engine block that I decided to display it on the finished model. I spent around an extra day painting the engine.





The engine is built straight from the box. Eduard supplies four sets of individual yellow stencil-style digits (0-9) for the engine serial number. I found a number of photos of DB 601 engines that appeared to have a bare metal top engine cover, so I decided this would add a bit of interest.

I also found photos of later engines with the engine model number painted on the top cover, so I thought I would apply a little artistic license and do the same with mine. The "601" and "A" decals were sourced from an old unlabelled sheet of serial numbers, which I think came from Fantasy Printshop. Hey, it reads "109" when it is is upside down - spooky!





The engineering and parts breakdown is essentially the same as the 1/32 scale kit but my impression so far is that the fit is slightly better. There are a few interesting changes to the engineering though, such as the three-piece tail wheel assembly trapped between the empennage halves and the new, more precise and robust method for securing the horseshoe oil cooler.

BTW, in my review last week I mentioned a sink mark on the rear cover for the instrument panel. In fact, it is not a sink mark - it is actually a moulded recess for the back of one of the cowl machine guns. I should have remembered this from the 1/32 scale kit!

The fit of the kit so far has been very impressive, although getting the assembled engine / firewall / gun deck assembly between the fuselage halves is a bit tricky. The exhausts actually hold the engine very securely and accurately in place by themselves, so next time I will probably attach the mounts to the engine but not glue them to the firewall. That way, the engine could be fitted first, and the firewall could be added later.

Along similar lines, I did not install the cockpit floor section until after the fuselage halves were joined. Once the fuselage was set, I simply pushed the cockpit floor up through the hole in the bottom of the fuselage and it clicked into place.





I also deviated from the instructions with the wing assembly. I glued the full-span lower wing to the fuselage and made sure the dihedral and general fit was set before adding the upper wing halves. Dihedral looks good, the upper parts sit down properly over the wheel well linings and there is no gap at the wing root.





I am really enjoying this build so far, and I look forward to starting the paint job later today.





Bye for now,

Brett



Brett Green - Editor
HyperScale
http://www.hyperscale.com
Love the cockpit and engine. Beautifuly done indeed.

Serge Dompierre
Frog and Canuck and proud to be
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Joined: March 4th, 2005, 9:59 pm

February 13th, 2012, 10:17 pm #5

Hi all,

I have been working on the new Eduard 1/48 scale Bf 109 E-1 over the last couple of days and I thought I would post a few progress photos.

The cockpit looks great with its colour photo-etched parts. Detail is to the same level as the 1/32 scale kit. Apart from the addition of a few Aeroscale cockpit placard decals, the cockpit is straight from the box.





I was painting on the weekend while the family was in the house, so I weathered with an acrylic Citadel "Devlan Mud" wash instead of the smelly oil-based washes that I would usually use. The acrylic wash was okay, but lacked some of the subtlety and smoother blending of an oil wash.





My original plan was to build this model with the engine cowling glued in place, but I was so impressed with the detail as I built up the engine block that I decided to display it on the finished model. I spent around an extra day painting the engine.





The engine is built straight from the box. Eduard supplies four sets of individual yellow stencil-style digits (0-9) for the engine serial number. I found a number of photos of DB 601 engines that appeared to have a bare metal top engine cover, so I decided this would add a bit of interest.

I also found photos of later engines with the engine model number painted on the top cover, so I thought I would apply a little artistic license and do the same with mine. The "601" and "A" decals were sourced from an old unlabelled sheet of serial numbers, which I think came from Fantasy Printshop. Hey, it reads "109" when it is is upside down - spooky!





The engineering and parts breakdown is essentially the same as the 1/32 scale kit but my impression so far is that the fit is slightly better. There are a few interesting changes to the engineering though, such as the three-piece tail wheel assembly trapped between the empennage halves and the new, more precise and robust method for securing the horseshoe oil cooler.

BTW, in my review last week I mentioned a sink mark on the rear cover for the instrument panel. In fact, it is not a sink mark - it is actually a moulded recess for the back of one of the cowl machine guns. I should have remembered this from the 1/32 scale kit!

The fit of the kit so far has been very impressive, although getting the assembled engine / firewall / gun deck assembly between the fuselage halves is a bit tricky. The exhausts actually hold the engine very securely and accurately in place by themselves, so next time I will probably attach the mounts to the engine but not glue them to the firewall. That way, the engine could be fitted first, and the firewall could be added later.

Along similar lines, I did not install the cockpit floor section until after the fuselage halves were joined. Once the fuselage was set, I simply pushed the cockpit floor up through the hole in the bottom of the fuselage and it clicked into place.





I also deviated from the instructions with the wing assembly. I glued the full-span lower wing to the fuselage and made sure the dihedral and general fit was set before adding the upper wing halves. Dihedral looks good, the upper parts sit down properly over the wheel well linings and there is no gap at the wing root.





I am really enjoying this build so far, and I look forward to starting the paint job later today.





Bye for now,

Brett



Brett Green - Editor
HyperScale
http://www.hyperscale.com
Hi Brett

Neat so far, I'm looking forward to starting mine when it arrives.

A good way to blend in dried acrylic washes is to use a little Vallejo acrylic airbrush cleaner on a small brush, it's very mild and won't harm the paint work but will sort out excess wash. I learnt that trick from Mig Jimenez's DVD on weathering with acrylics.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 13th, 2012, 10:26 pm #6

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Brett Green - Editor
HyperScale
http://www.hyperscale.com
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 2:59 am

February 13th, 2012, 11:57 pm #7

Hi all,

I have been working on the new Eduard 1/48 scale Bf 109 E-1 over the last couple of days and I thought I would post a few progress photos.

The cockpit looks great with its colour photo-etched parts. Detail is to the same level as the 1/32 scale kit. Apart from the addition of a few Aeroscale cockpit placard decals, the cockpit is straight from the box.





I was painting on the weekend while the family was in the house, so I weathered with an acrylic Citadel "Devlan Mud" wash instead of the smelly oil-based washes that I would usually use. The acrylic wash was okay, but lacked some of the subtlety and smoother blending of an oil wash.





My original plan was to build this model with the engine cowling glued in place, but I was so impressed with the detail as I built up the engine block that I decided to display it on the finished model. I spent around an extra day painting the engine.





The engine is built straight from the box. Eduard supplies four sets of individual yellow stencil-style digits (0-9) for the engine serial number. I found a number of photos of DB 601 engines that appeared to have a bare metal top engine cover, so I decided this would add a bit of interest.

I also found photos of later engines with the engine model number painted on the top cover, so I thought I would apply a little artistic license and do the same with mine. The "601" and "A" decals were sourced from an old unlabelled sheet of serial numbers, which I think came from Fantasy Printshop. Hey, it reads "109" when it is is upside down - spooky!





The engineering and parts breakdown is essentially the same as the 1/32 scale kit but my impression so far is that the fit is slightly better. There are a few interesting changes to the engineering though, such as the three-piece tail wheel assembly trapped between the empennage halves and the new, more precise and robust method for securing the horseshoe oil cooler.

BTW, in my review last week I mentioned a sink mark on the rear cover for the instrument panel. In fact, it is not a sink mark - it is actually a moulded recess for the back of one of the cowl machine guns. I should have remembered this from the 1/32 scale kit!

The fit of the kit so far has been very impressive, although getting the assembled engine / firewall / gun deck assembly between the fuselage halves is a bit tricky. The exhausts actually hold the engine very securely and accurately in place by themselves, so next time I will probably attach the mounts to the engine but not glue them to the firewall. That way, the engine could be fitted first, and the firewall could be added later.

Along similar lines, I did not install the cockpit floor section until after the fuselage halves were joined. Once the fuselage was set, I simply pushed the cockpit floor up through the hole in the bottom of the fuselage and it clicked into place.





I also deviated from the instructions with the wing assembly. I glued the full-span lower wing to the fuselage and made sure the dihedral and general fit was set before adding the upper wing halves. Dihedral looks good, the upper parts sit down properly over the wheel well linings and there is no gap at the wing root.





I am really enjoying this build so far, and I look forward to starting the paint job later today.





Bye for now,

Brett



Brett Green - Editor
HyperScale
http://www.hyperscale.com
Do you plan to sand down the fuselage hump, or is it not worth the effort?

Another trick for dealing with Citadel washes is to mix them with some Polly Scale or Vallejo clear flat. You won't necessarily be able to remove any excess afterwards, but it allows the colour to feather nicely. I do the same with inks and clear semigloss for washes over metallics, e.g. landing gear, engines, etc.

Cheers,
Tony
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Joined: March 19th, 2007, 11:13 pm

February 14th, 2012, 12:59 am #8

Hi all,

I have been working on the new Eduard 1/48 scale Bf 109 E-1 over the last couple of days and I thought I would post a few progress photos.

The cockpit looks great with its colour photo-etched parts. Detail is to the same level as the 1/32 scale kit. Apart from the addition of a few Aeroscale cockpit placard decals, the cockpit is straight from the box.





I was painting on the weekend while the family was in the house, so I weathered with an acrylic Citadel "Devlan Mud" wash instead of the smelly oil-based washes that I would usually use. The acrylic wash was okay, but lacked some of the subtlety and smoother blending of an oil wash.





My original plan was to build this model with the engine cowling glued in place, but I was so impressed with the detail as I built up the engine block that I decided to display it on the finished model. I spent around an extra day painting the engine.





The engine is built straight from the box. Eduard supplies four sets of individual yellow stencil-style digits (0-9) for the engine serial number. I found a number of photos of DB 601 engines that appeared to have a bare metal top engine cover, so I decided this would add a bit of interest.

I also found photos of later engines with the engine model number painted on the top cover, so I thought I would apply a little artistic license and do the same with mine. The "601" and "A" decals were sourced from an old unlabelled sheet of serial numbers, which I think came from Fantasy Printshop. Hey, it reads "109" when it is is upside down - spooky!





The engineering and parts breakdown is essentially the same as the 1/32 scale kit but my impression so far is that the fit is slightly better. There are a few interesting changes to the engineering though, such as the three-piece tail wheel assembly trapped between the empennage halves and the new, more precise and robust method for securing the horseshoe oil cooler.

BTW, in my review last week I mentioned a sink mark on the rear cover for the instrument panel. In fact, it is not a sink mark - it is actually a moulded recess for the back of one of the cowl machine guns. I should have remembered this from the 1/32 scale kit!

The fit of the kit so far has been very impressive, although getting the assembled engine / firewall / gun deck assembly between the fuselage halves is a bit tricky. The exhausts actually hold the engine very securely and accurately in place by themselves, so next time I will probably attach the mounts to the engine but not glue them to the firewall. That way, the engine could be fitted first, and the firewall could be added later.

Along similar lines, I did not install the cockpit floor section until after the fuselage halves were joined. Once the fuselage was set, I simply pushed the cockpit floor up through the hole in the bottom of the fuselage and it clicked into place.





I also deviated from the instructions with the wing assembly. I glued the full-span lower wing to the fuselage and made sure the dihedral and general fit was set before adding the upper wing halves. Dihedral looks good, the upper parts sit down properly over the wheel well linings and there is no gap at the wing root.





I am really enjoying this build so far, and I look forward to starting the paint job later today.





Bye for now,

Brett



Brett Green - Editor
HyperScale
http://www.hyperscale.com
Looks great Brett! I will have to order some of the extra sprues now since I have some old Aeroscale sets for Battle of Britain 109's. I'm sure you've tried it but I dilute oils with lighter fluid. It smells less than thinners and dries very quickly. I too have had limited success with acrylic washes but I will try Jamie's hint. Keep the photos coming!
Last edited by Bumpkins on February 14th, 2012, 1:03 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 31st, 2004, 2:30 am

February 14th, 2012, 2:40 am #9

Hi all,

I have been working on the new Eduard 1/48 scale Bf 109 E-1 over the last couple of days and I thought I would post a few progress photos.

The cockpit looks great with its colour photo-etched parts. Detail is to the same level as the 1/32 scale kit. Apart from the addition of a few Aeroscale cockpit placard decals, the cockpit is straight from the box.





I was painting on the weekend while the family was in the house, so I weathered with an acrylic Citadel "Devlan Mud" wash instead of the smelly oil-based washes that I would usually use. The acrylic wash was okay, but lacked some of the subtlety and smoother blending of an oil wash.





My original plan was to build this model with the engine cowling glued in place, but I was so impressed with the detail as I built up the engine block that I decided to display it on the finished model. I spent around an extra day painting the engine.





The engine is built straight from the box. Eduard supplies four sets of individual yellow stencil-style digits (0-9) for the engine serial number. I found a number of photos of DB 601 engines that appeared to have a bare metal top engine cover, so I decided this would add a bit of interest.

I also found photos of later engines with the engine model number painted on the top cover, so I thought I would apply a little artistic license and do the same with mine. The "601" and "A" decals were sourced from an old unlabelled sheet of serial numbers, which I think came from Fantasy Printshop. Hey, it reads "109" when it is is upside down - spooky!





The engineering and parts breakdown is essentially the same as the 1/32 scale kit but my impression so far is that the fit is slightly better. There are a few interesting changes to the engineering though, such as the three-piece tail wheel assembly trapped between the empennage halves and the new, more precise and robust method for securing the horseshoe oil cooler.

BTW, in my review last week I mentioned a sink mark on the rear cover for the instrument panel. In fact, it is not a sink mark - it is actually a moulded recess for the back of one of the cowl machine guns. I should have remembered this from the 1/32 scale kit!

The fit of the kit so far has been very impressive, although getting the assembled engine / firewall / gun deck assembly between the fuselage halves is a bit tricky. The exhausts actually hold the engine very securely and accurately in place by themselves, so next time I will probably attach the mounts to the engine but not glue them to the firewall. That way, the engine could be fitted first, and the firewall could be added later.

Along similar lines, I did not install the cockpit floor section until after the fuselage halves were joined. Once the fuselage was set, I simply pushed the cockpit floor up through the hole in the bottom of the fuselage and it clicked into place.





I also deviated from the instructions with the wing assembly. I glued the full-span lower wing to the fuselage and made sure the dihedral and general fit was set before adding the upper wing halves. Dihedral looks good, the upper parts sit down properly over the wheel well linings and there is no gap at the wing root.





I am really enjoying this build so far, and I look forward to starting the paint job later today.





Bye for now,

Brett



Brett Green - Editor
HyperScale
http://www.hyperscale.com
Great work fo far, just wondering how many more Emil kits we need in 1/48th scale?? LOL


Cheers, Stephen
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Joined: March 14th, 2007, 12:13 pm

February 14th, 2012, 3:53 am #10

Hi all,

I have been working on the new Eduard 1/48 scale Bf 109 E-1 over the last couple of days and I thought I would post a few progress photos.

The cockpit looks great with its colour photo-etched parts. Detail is to the same level as the 1/32 scale kit. Apart from the addition of a few Aeroscale cockpit placard decals, the cockpit is straight from the box.





I was painting on the weekend while the family was in the house, so I weathered with an acrylic Citadel "Devlan Mud" wash instead of the smelly oil-based washes that I would usually use. The acrylic wash was okay, but lacked some of the subtlety and smoother blending of an oil wash.





My original plan was to build this model with the engine cowling glued in place, but I was so impressed with the detail as I built up the engine block that I decided to display it on the finished model. I spent around an extra day painting the engine.





The engine is built straight from the box. Eduard supplies four sets of individual yellow stencil-style digits (0-9) for the engine serial number. I found a number of photos of DB 601 engines that appeared to have a bare metal top engine cover, so I decided this would add a bit of interest.

I also found photos of later engines with the engine model number painted on the top cover, so I thought I would apply a little artistic license and do the same with mine. The "601" and "A" decals were sourced from an old unlabelled sheet of serial numbers, which I think came from Fantasy Printshop. Hey, it reads "109" when it is is upside down - spooky!





The engineering and parts breakdown is essentially the same as the 1/32 scale kit but my impression so far is that the fit is slightly better. There are a few interesting changes to the engineering though, such as the three-piece tail wheel assembly trapped between the empennage halves and the new, more precise and robust method for securing the horseshoe oil cooler.

BTW, in my review last week I mentioned a sink mark on the rear cover for the instrument panel. In fact, it is not a sink mark - it is actually a moulded recess for the back of one of the cowl machine guns. I should have remembered this from the 1/32 scale kit!

The fit of the kit so far has been very impressive, although getting the assembled engine / firewall / gun deck assembly between the fuselage halves is a bit tricky. The exhausts actually hold the engine very securely and accurately in place by themselves, so next time I will probably attach the mounts to the engine but not glue them to the firewall. That way, the engine could be fitted first, and the firewall could be added later.

Along similar lines, I did not install the cockpit floor section until after the fuselage halves were joined. Once the fuselage was set, I simply pushed the cockpit floor up through the hole in the bottom of the fuselage and it clicked into place.





I also deviated from the instructions with the wing assembly. I glued the full-span lower wing to the fuselage and made sure the dihedral and general fit was set before adding the upper wing halves. Dihedral looks good, the upper parts sit down properly over the wheel well linings and there is no gap at the wing root.





I am really enjoying this build so far, and I look forward to starting the paint job later today.





Bye for now,

Brett



Brett Green - Editor
HyperScale
http://www.hyperscale.com
Good Afternoon All,
I have used the citadel / Warhammer chestnut , flesh, black and blue washes ( marketed / sold as washes by citadel) with some success on my aircraft. If you thin the wash ( around 60%wash and 40% thinning agent )with a thinning agent mix of Windex and distilled water ( 50% Windex 50% water) it helps to control the contrast and lets you work the wash for a little longer. I have found laying up the washes in a couple of passes helps reduce the OOP's factor, gentle passes with a lightly loaded 3/0 or 5/0 brush is what works for me. As always test the way it flows and the colour density on a hanger queen before you apply it to your latest gem.
There is virtually no smell and it dries quick ( be warned).

regards
Dan
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