Curtiss P-6E, 33rd Pursuit, 1937, Monogram, W.I.P.

Curtiss P-6E, 33rd Pursuit, 1937, Monogram, W.I.P.

Joined: September 9th, 2004, 3:43 am

September 10th, 2011, 2:45 pm #1

This vintage kit is an excellent example of both the classic period of aviation and of model making.



It does need some interior work: here is basic side-wall and such,scratch-built:





Since I want to do a blue and yellow example, the kit does need some modification to the late service style of spats, and provision of full wheels:





I also decided to improve the exhaust stubs.


Fit is quite nice, even of the upper cowling and cowling front pieces.



Raised detail on the panels is appropriate for this model,as Curtiss panels in this period had raised edges. There is such a join at the seam of the cowling top with the fuselage,and I replicated this with .004" brass wire.

Here is a look in the cockpit:



I decided I was not satisfied with my first run at replacing the kit's exhaust stubs; here is the early portion of the second pass. They are made of .8mm rod, and set at a downward angle,as they were actually at right angles to the cylinders:



Lower wing fit was very good,and so was that of the horizontal stabilizer. I have added control horns for the elevators:





The exhaust stubs have been sanded down to proper lengths,and opened up.

Here is a view of the underside: the area round the radiator is open on the kit;I filledit in.I am not sure this is correct,but the open gape into yellow plastic could not be proper either:





Painting is underway:





Paints are PollyScale, cut with future,and applied over white Tamiya primer. Quartermaster blue and yellow were used; the blue was mixed with some Azure Blue,to grey it down a bit and make it a bit paler, and the Yellow with a bit of red,as the white undercoat was leaving it a bit too pale and washed-out. The red nose is from a 33rd Pursuit scheme on a Starfighter Decal sheet.

Here is a picture with the the upper wing and vertical tail surface temporarily in place:

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Joined: January 14th, 2009, 2:52 pm

September 10th, 2011, 5:17 pm #2



"The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated." -- Mohandas Gandhi
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Joined: July 8th, 2008, 10:57 am

September 10th, 2011, 11:30 pm #3

This vintage kit is an excellent example of both the classic period of aviation and of model making.



It does need some interior work: here is basic side-wall and such,scratch-built:





Since I want to do a blue and yellow example, the kit does need some modification to the late service style of spats, and provision of full wheels:





I also decided to improve the exhaust stubs.


Fit is quite nice, even of the upper cowling and cowling front pieces.



Raised detail on the panels is appropriate for this model,as Curtiss panels in this period had raised edges. There is such a join at the seam of the cowling top with the fuselage,and I replicated this with .004" brass wire.

Here is a look in the cockpit:



I decided I was not satisfied with my first run at replacing the kit's exhaust stubs; here is the early portion of the second pass. They are made of .8mm rod, and set at a downward angle,as they were actually at right angles to the cylinders:



Lower wing fit was very good,and so was that of the horizontal stabilizer. I have added control horns for the elevators:





The exhaust stubs have been sanded down to proper lengths,and opened up.

Here is a view of the underside: the area round the radiator is open on the kit;I filledit in.I am not sure this is correct,but the open gape into yellow plastic could not be proper either:





Painting is underway:





Paints are PollyScale, cut with future,and applied over white Tamiya primer. Quartermaster blue and yellow were used; the blue was mixed with some Azure Blue,to grey it down a bit and make it a bit paler, and the Yellow with a bit of red,as the white undercoat was leaving it a bit too pale and washed-out. The red nose is from a 33rd Pursuit scheme on a Starfighter Decal sheet.

Here is a picture with the the upper wing and vertical tail surface temporarily in place:

Those exhaust stubs must have been a joy to get straight and true. And I agree, great looking cockpit!

One of my very favorite between-the-wars aircraft; will follow with rapt interest.

Stuart
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Joined: November 13th, 2008, 10:18 pm

September 12th, 2011, 6:08 pm #4

This vintage kit is an excellent example of both the classic period of aviation and of model making.



It does need some interior work: here is basic side-wall and such,scratch-built:





Since I want to do a blue and yellow example, the kit does need some modification to the late service style of spats, and provision of full wheels:





I also decided to improve the exhaust stubs.


Fit is quite nice, even of the upper cowling and cowling front pieces.



Raised detail on the panels is appropriate for this model,as Curtiss panels in this period had raised edges. There is such a join at the seam of the cowling top with the fuselage,and I replicated this with .004" brass wire.

Here is a look in the cockpit:



I decided I was not satisfied with my first run at replacing the kit's exhaust stubs; here is the early portion of the second pass. They are made of .8mm rod, and set at a downward angle,as they were actually at right angles to the cylinders:



Lower wing fit was very good,and so was that of the horizontal stabilizer. I have added control horns for the elevators:





The exhaust stubs have been sanded down to proper lengths,and opened up.

Here is a view of the underside: the area round the radiator is open on the kit;I filledit in.I am not sure this is correct,but the open gape into yellow plastic could not be proper either:





Painting is underway:





Paints are PollyScale, cut with future,and applied over white Tamiya primer. Quartermaster blue and yellow were used; the blue was mixed with some Azure Blue,to grey it down a bit and make it a bit paler, and the Yellow with a bit of red,as the white undercoat was leaving it a bit too pale and washed-out. The red nose is from a 33rd Pursuit scheme on a Starfighter Decal sheet.

Here is a picture with the the upper wing and vertical tail surface temporarily in place:

I just love these colourful US aircraft from the 1930's! Excellent work with this kit - especially getting good paint coverage on that bright yellow plastic! Very nice work on the wheels, exhaust stubs and that cockpit looks right on Old Man!! I have the (once built) remains of this kit in a bag somewhere, along with those same Starfighter decals. A keen eye have I on this build!
Best...Ted...

Current Build:
Mad About Migs Pt. 1; Mad About Migs Pt. 2

Tall Tales:
Kanal Kampf: A Spitfire Story
Cold War Incident
The Lucky Mig

Previous WIP Builds:
Matilda Makeover Pt.1; Matilda Makeover Pt.2; Matilda Makeover Pt.3; Matilda Makeover Finish;

The Big Spit Pt.1; The Big Spit Pt.2; The Big Spit Pt.3; The Big Spit Pt.4; The Big Spit Pt.5; The Big Spit Pt.6;
The Big Spit Pt.7; The Big Spit Pt.8; The Big Spit Pt.9; The Big Spit Pt.10; The Big Spit Pt.11; The Big Spit Finish;

Me109 Pt.1; Me109 Pt.2; Me109 Pt.3; Me109 Finish;

Vickers Tank Pt.1; Vickers Tank Pt.2; Vickers Tank Pt.3; Vickers Tank Pt.4; Vickers Tank Pt.5; Vickers Tank Pt.6; Vickers Tank Finish;

Connies Pt.1; Connies Pt.2; Connies Pt.3; Connies Pt.4; Connies Pt.5; Connies Pt.6; Connies Pt.7; Connies Finish

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Joined: April 2nd, 2007, 11:33 pm

September 13th, 2011, 4:55 pm #5

This vintage kit is an excellent example of both the classic period of aviation and of model making.



It does need some interior work: here is basic side-wall and such,scratch-built:





Since I want to do a blue and yellow example, the kit does need some modification to the late service style of spats, and provision of full wheels:





I also decided to improve the exhaust stubs.


Fit is quite nice, even of the upper cowling and cowling front pieces.



Raised detail on the panels is appropriate for this model,as Curtiss panels in this period had raised edges. There is such a join at the seam of the cowling top with the fuselage,and I replicated this with .004" brass wire.

Here is a look in the cockpit:



I decided I was not satisfied with my first run at replacing the kit's exhaust stubs; here is the early portion of the second pass. They are made of .8mm rod, and set at a downward angle,as they were actually at right angles to the cylinders:



Lower wing fit was very good,and so was that of the horizontal stabilizer. I have added control horns for the elevators:





The exhaust stubs have been sanded down to proper lengths,and opened up.

Here is a view of the underside: the area round the radiator is open on the kit;I filledit in.I am not sure this is correct,but the open gape into yellow plastic could not be proper either:





Painting is underway:





Paints are PollyScale, cut with future,and applied over white Tamiya primer. Quartermaster blue and yellow were used; the blue was mixed with some Azure Blue,to grey it down a bit and make it a bit paler, and the Yellow with a bit of red,as the white undercoat was leaving it a bit too pale and washed-out. The red nose is from a 33rd Pursuit scheme on a Starfighter Decal sheet.

Here is a picture with the the upper wing and vertical tail surface temporarily in place:

I've built that one 9,000 times and the cockpit never looked that good!

Nice start. This will be nice to see finished with good tutorials along the way...

Regards,

Dan From Tacoma, Washington USA
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Joined: December 24th, 2005, 1:07 pm

September 13th, 2011, 8:25 pm #6

This vintage kit is an excellent example of both the classic period of aviation and of model making.



It does need some interior work: here is basic side-wall and such,scratch-built:





Since I want to do a blue and yellow example, the kit does need some modification to the late service style of spats, and provision of full wheels:





I also decided to improve the exhaust stubs.


Fit is quite nice, even of the upper cowling and cowling front pieces.



Raised detail on the panels is appropriate for this model,as Curtiss panels in this period had raised edges. There is such a join at the seam of the cowling top with the fuselage,and I replicated this with .004" brass wire.

Here is a look in the cockpit:



I decided I was not satisfied with my first run at replacing the kit's exhaust stubs; here is the early portion of the second pass. They are made of .8mm rod, and set at a downward angle,as they were actually at right angles to the cylinders:



Lower wing fit was very good,and so was that of the horizontal stabilizer. I have added control horns for the elevators:





The exhaust stubs have been sanded down to proper lengths,and opened up.

Here is a view of the underside: the area round the radiator is open on the kit;I filledit in.I am not sure this is correct,but the open gape into yellow plastic could not be proper either:





Painting is underway:





Paints are PollyScale, cut with future,and applied over white Tamiya primer. Quartermaster blue and yellow were used; the blue was mixed with some Azure Blue,to grey it down a bit and make it a bit paler, and the Yellow with a bit of red,as the white undercoat was leaving it a bit too pale and washed-out. The red nose is from a 33rd Pursuit scheme on a Starfighter Decal sheet.

Here is a picture with the the upper wing and vertical tail surface temporarily in place:

That's a very nice and handy tutorial on building this kit - I didn't know of the differences in wheel spats

Excellent trick with the exhaust stubs - you must have had tons of fun opening them up

Great work

* <i></i> * *
William De Coster / Belgium / past builds on HS : Plastic Stories

1/72 - Airfix - Spitfre PR.XIX : Part I (incl Flying Legends 2011 show report) - Part II - Part III - Part IV (incl. Pilsenkit 2011 show report pt.1)
1/72 - AGA - Polikarpov I-3 : Part I - Part II - Part III - Part IV - Part IV
1/72 - KP - MiG-15 UTI : Part I - Part II (incl. Pilsenkit 2011 show report pt.2)

Just like the perfect woman doesn't exist, I will never build a perfect model.
Puts me on a par with God
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