Curtiss P-1A Hawk, Chilean Air Force, 1/72, Completed

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Curtiss P-1A Hawk, Chilean Air Force, 1/72, Completed

Joined: September 9th, 2004, 3:43 am

July 9th, 2012, 9:19 pm #1

Curtiss P--1A Hawk, Groupo de Aviacion No. 1, Alto Hospicio, Iquique, Chilean Air Force, 1929.


Curtiss sold nearly as many 'Hawk' fighters abroad as it did to the U.S. Army and Navy combined. Chile's order for eight P-1A Hawks, followed by an order for eight P-1B Hawks, was the first substantial foreign order for fighter planes Curtiss received.



This build is something between an extreme conversion and a scratch-build: it employs the wings of a Monogram P-6E kit, as well as that kit's interplane struts and a portion of its forward decking (much altered); the rest is scratch-built, save the spinner and wheels, pinched from the spares box.





Decals are home-made. Wife worked wonders setting up Curtiss logo, number, lacings, and the shields (these were of different proportion than at present back then). The Testor's material I have, though, is really not very good, and I had to do some over-painting on the shields, even though they were printed on white film. The best I can say about the Testor's stuff is that it is rwadily available, and can be made to work....







Here is a look at the under-side, showing the 'pass through' arrangement of the under-carriage legs, and the fairings for the bell-cranks actuating the ailerons....

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Joined: April 17th, 2012, 3:47 am

July 9th, 2012, 11:29 pm #2

I'm looking forward to seeing more of your builds. Keep up the good work!

John
Elkhart, Indiana
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Joined: July 8th, 2008, 10:57 am

July 10th, 2012, 2:08 am #3

Curtiss P--1A Hawk, Groupo de Aviacion No. 1, Alto Hospicio, Iquique, Chilean Air Force, 1929.


Curtiss sold nearly as many 'Hawk' fighters abroad as it did to the U.S. Army and Navy combined. Chile's order for eight P-1A Hawks, followed by an order for eight P-1B Hawks, was the first substantial foreign order for fighter planes Curtiss received.



This build is something between an extreme conversion and a scratch-build: it employs the wings of a Monogram P-6E kit, as well as that kit's interplane struts and a portion of its forward decking (much altered); the rest is scratch-built, save the spinner and wheels, pinched from the spares box.





Decals are home-made. Wife worked wonders setting up Curtiss logo, number, lacings, and the shields (these were of different proportion than at present back then). The Testor's material I have, though, is really not very good, and I had to do some over-painting on the shields, even though they were printed on white film. The best I can say about the Testor's stuff is that it is rwadily available, and can be made to work....







Here is a look at the under-side, showing the 'pass through' arrangement of the under-carriage legs, and the fairings for the bell-cranks actuating the ailerons....

Wow, that shows some amazing modeling skills to scratch and finagle that together with all the nice details. And kudos to your wife for such a great job on the "Curtiss" script logo!

You must have an amazing collection of interesting and unusual models.

Stuart
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Joined: December 24th, 2005, 1:07 pm

July 10th, 2012, 8:18 pm #4

Curtiss P--1A Hawk, Groupo de Aviacion No. 1, Alto Hospicio, Iquique, Chilean Air Force, 1929.


Curtiss sold nearly as many 'Hawk' fighters abroad as it did to the U.S. Army and Navy combined. Chile's order for eight P-1A Hawks, followed by an order for eight P-1B Hawks, was the first substantial foreign order for fighter planes Curtiss received.



This build is something between an extreme conversion and a scratch-build: it employs the wings of a Monogram P-6E kit, as well as that kit's interplane struts and a portion of its forward decking (much altered); the rest is scratch-built, save the spinner and wheels, pinched from the spares box.





Decals are home-made. Wife worked wonders setting up Curtiss logo, number, lacings, and the shields (these were of different proportion than at present back then). The Testor's material I have, though, is really not very good, and I had to do some over-painting on the shields, even though they were printed on white film. The best I can say about the Testor's stuff is that it is rwadily available, and can be made to work....







Here is a look at the under-side, showing the 'pass through' arrangement of the under-carriage legs, and the fairings for the bell-cranks actuating the ailerons....

You barely recognize the Monogram P-6 in it - great work on the exhausts and the radiator - and of course that undercarriage

Splendid addition to your collection - it is giving me some strong inspiration to build something unusual again

* <i></i> * *
William De Coster / Belgium / Supporting Euro 2012 / Plastic Stories

1/72 - Special Hobby - TT-1 Pinto : Part I (incl Panthers Cup 2012 show report)
1/72 - Airfix/Jo-Han - Mitsubishi Zero/Rufe conversion: Part I
1/72 - Airfix - Douglas Devastator : Part I

Just like the perfect woman doesn't exist, I will never build a perfect model.
Puts me on a par with God
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Joined: November 15th, 2005, 7:52 pm

July 12th, 2012, 6:30 pm #5

Curtiss P--1A Hawk, Groupo de Aviacion No. 1, Alto Hospicio, Iquique, Chilean Air Force, 1929.


Curtiss sold nearly as many 'Hawk' fighters abroad as it did to the U.S. Army and Navy combined. Chile's order for eight P-1A Hawks, followed by an order for eight P-1B Hawks, was the first substantial foreign order for fighter planes Curtiss received.



This build is something between an extreme conversion and a scratch-build: it employs the wings of a Monogram P-6E kit, as well as that kit's interplane struts and a portion of its forward decking (much altered); the rest is scratch-built, save the spinner and wheels, pinched from the spares box.





Decals are home-made. Wife worked wonders setting up Curtiss logo, number, lacings, and the shields (these were of different proportion than at present back then). The Testor's material I have, though, is really not very good, and I had to do some over-painting on the shields, even though they were printed on white film. The best I can say about the Testor's stuff is that it is rwadily available, and can be made to work....







Here is a look at the under-side, showing the 'pass through' arrangement of the under-carriage legs, and the fairings for the bell-cranks actuating the ailerons....

I really like the "non-traditional" subject matter and the model looks top-notch!

Cheers!

Rick
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Joined: April 2nd, 2007, 11:33 pm

July 12th, 2012, 9:22 pm #6

Curtiss P--1A Hawk, Groupo de Aviacion No. 1, Alto Hospicio, Iquique, Chilean Air Force, 1929.


Curtiss sold nearly as many 'Hawk' fighters abroad as it did to the U.S. Army and Navy combined. Chile's order for eight P-1A Hawks, followed by an order for eight P-1B Hawks, was the first substantial foreign order for fighter planes Curtiss received.



This build is something between an extreme conversion and a scratch-build: it employs the wings of a Monogram P-6E kit, as well as that kit's interplane struts and a portion of its forward decking (much altered); the rest is scratch-built, save the spinner and wheels, pinched from the spares box.





Decals are home-made. Wife worked wonders setting up Curtiss logo, number, lacings, and the shields (these were of different proportion than at present back then). The Testor's material I have, though, is really not very good, and I had to do some over-painting on the shields, even though they were printed on white film. The best I can say about the Testor's stuff is that it is rwadily available, and can be made to work....







Here is a look at the under-side, showing the 'pass through' arrangement of the under-carriage legs, and the fairings for the bell-cranks actuating the ailerons....

I've always liked the look of that one and you've captured it. And again, the markings are unusual and special.

Great finish.
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Joined: September 9th, 2004, 3:43 am

July 19th, 2012, 7:10 pm #7

I'm looking forward to seeing more of your builds. Keep up the good work!

John
Elkhart, Indiana
"God willing and the creek don't rise...."
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Joined: September 9th, 2004, 3:43 am

July 19th, 2012, 7:12 pm #8

Wow, that shows some amazing modeling skills to scratch and finagle that together with all the nice details. And kudos to your wife for such a great job on the "Curtiss" script logo!

You must have an amazing collection of interesting and unusual models.

Stuart
I do not know if the collection is amazing, but it does have a number of not so usual types....
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Joined: September 9th, 2004, 3:43 am

July 19th, 2012, 7:19 pm #9

You barely recognize the Monogram P-6 in it - great work on the exhausts and the radiator - and of course that undercarriage

Splendid addition to your collection - it is giving me some strong inspiration to build something unusual again

* <i></i> * *
William De Coster / Belgium / Supporting Euro 2012 / Plastic Stories

1/72 - Special Hobby - TT-1 Pinto : Part I (incl Panthers Cup 2012 show report)
1/72 - Airfix/Jo-Han - Mitsubishi Zero/Rufe conversion: Part I
1/72 - Airfix - Douglas Devastator : Part I

Just like the perfect woman doesn't exist, I will never build a perfect model.
Puts me on a par with God
The odd thing about the Curtiss Hawk biplanes is how little change there actually was, at least in the basics, over the life of the type. The wings changed not at all, and the alterations to the basic fuselage structure were minor. There was great apparent variation owing to different engines and different stringer fairings, and tweaks with the tail surfaces, but the essentials remained the same. You can look at this two ways, of course: as a demonstration of hide-bound thinking, or as a display of great engineering skill wringing increases in performance of up to 50% out of a design over its life-time.
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Joined: September 9th, 2004, 3:43 am

July 19th, 2012, 7:20 pm #10

I really like the "non-traditional" subject matter and the model looks top-notch!

Cheers!

Rick
Curtiss machines got around....
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