Comment on Airfix FW-190 review

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Comment on Airfix FW-190 review

Joined: March 27th, 2007, 5:02 am

August 23rd, 2013, 1:26 am #1

Just a thought ....

The reviewer notes that he considers it "inexcusable" that the kit decal sheet does not provide any swastikas, even in "broken" form as some other manufacturers use to get around the various product laws. He's entitled to his opinion, but "inexcusable" seems a little harsh to me. Rather than just blast the product for this omission, perhaps the reviewer could provide a suggestion to Airfix to enable them to work around the fact that if they provide a swastika on the decal sheet, they need to show where it is placed on the kit: the artwork for that being displayed prominently on the back of the box (this being a Series 1 kit).

I would suggest that there are two types of customers who will purchase this kit (or have it purchased for them): those who don't care, and those who do. The former are self-explanatory, and very likely will primarily consist of younger modellers. For those who do, I would suggest that this probably won't be their first WW2 German aircraft kit and it's unlikely that they won't have come across this problem before; they will already have plenty of spares available, or know where to go to purchase them on sheets available from numerous manufacturers.

Still, there may be a workaround that Airfix (and other companies) could use: provide the swastika decals in the kit (in "broken" form if necessary) and rather than including the placement on the normal artwork, instead add a note in the instructions (or a separate sheet) describing the issue ("we're not allowed to display this on the box due to legal restrictions ...") and how to use the decals ("for greater accuracy ..."). Would that be sufficient to protect the product from the legal restrictions? (I have no idea.)

Of course, if the legal restrictions prevent the swastika artwork from appearing anywhere in the product (even on the inside) the above suggestion would be of little use, unless it was text-only (which may not be very helpful). And if the laws are that restrictive, then Airfix's omission of the swastikas would be the exact opposite of "inexcusable".


Bruce Probst
Melbourne, Australia
My modelling portfoliohttp://airfixtributeforum.myfastforum.o ... 22022.html
Last edited by BProbst on August 23rd, 2013, 1:29 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: February 15th, 2004, 4:59 pm

August 23rd, 2013, 1:41 am #2

If the manufacturer decide not to include said decals. Then they should tell on the sheet size, style and color. Some of us don't have a big reference library with the info for that aircraft.

One thing that gets my goat, is that with access to the internet, that manufacturers don't post photos, references, online builds, etc on their kits. It would go a long way to reducing some of the gripping that goes on.

Wayne
drinking an ice cold Pepsi
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Joined: January 27th, 2004, 5:18 pm

August 23rd, 2013, 2:29 am #3

Just a thought ....

The reviewer notes that he considers it "inexcusable" that the kit decal sheet does not provide any swastikas, even in "broken" form as some other manufacturers use to get around the various product laws. He's entitled to his opinion, but "inexcusable" seems a little harsh to me. Rather than just blast the product for this omission, perhaps the reviewer could provide a suggestion to Airfix to enable them to work around the fact that if they provide a swastika on the decal sheet, they need to show where it is placed on the kit: the artwork for that being displayed prominently on the back of the box (this being a Series 1 kit).

I would suggest that there are two types of customers who will purchase this kit (or have it purchased for them): those who don't care, and those who do. The former are self-explanatory, and very likely will primarily consist of younger modellers. For those who do, I would suggest that this probably won't be their first WW2 German aircraft kit and it's unlikely that they won't have come across this problem before; they will already have plenty of spares available, or know where to go to purchase them on sheets available from numerous manufacturers.

Still, there may be a workaround that Airfix (and other companies) could use: provide the swastika decals in the kit (in "broken" form if necessary) and rather than including the placement on the normal artwork, instead add a note in the instructions (or a separate sheet) describing the issue ("we're not allowed to display this on the box due to legal restrictions ...") and how to use the decals ("for greater accuracy ..."). Would that be sufficient to protect the product from the legal restrictions? (I have no idea.)

Of course, if the legal restrictions prevent the swastika artwork from appearing anywhere in the product (even on the inside) the above suggestion would be of little use, unless it was text-only (which may not be very helpful). And if the laws are that restrictive, then Airfix's omission of the swastikas would be the exact opposite of "inexcusable".


Bruce Probst
Melbourne, Australia
My modelling portfoliohttp://airfixtributeforum.myfastforum.o ... 22022.html
"Regrettable", "unfortunate", even "aggravating" would be acceptable adjectives to describe the intentional omission of the swastikas, no doubt a business decision to avoid potential distribution issues with the kit elsewhere in the EU. ("Understandable" would be another acceptable substitute.)

But "inexcusable"? No.

Lynn

Webmaster, The 50th Anniversary IPMS-USA National Convention in Hampton, Virginia

August 6-9, 2014
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Joined: July 8th, 2008, 10:57 am

August 23rd, 2013, 4:35 am #4

(Said tongue in cheek)

But I do think that giving only one scheme, which has a spinner spiral, and then omitting a decal for the spiral is inexcus... um, no, I'll use 'reprehensible.'

Stuart
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Joined: June 12th, 2008, 8:08 pm

August 23rd, 2013, 5:03 am #5

Just a thought ....

The reviewer notes that he considers it "inexcusable" that the kit decal sheet does not provide any swastikas, even in "broken" form as some other manufacturers use to get around the various product laws. He's entitled to his opinion, but "inexcusable" seems a little harsh to me. Rather than just blast the product for this omission, perhaps the reviewer could provide a suggestion to Airfix to enable them to work around the fact that if they provide a swastika on the decal sheet, they need to show where it is placed on the kit: the artwork for that being displayed prominently on the back of the box (this being a Series 1 kit).

I would suggest that there are two types of customers who will purchase this kit (or have it purchased for them): those who don't care, and those who do. The former are self-explanatory, and very likely will primarily consist of younger modellers. For those who do, I would suggest that this probably won't be their first WW2 German aircraft kit and it's unlikely that they won't have come across this problem before; they will already have plenty of spares available, or know where to go to purchase them on sheets available from numerous manufacturers.

Still, there may be a workaround that Airfix (and other companies) could use: provide the swastika decals in the kit (in "broken" form if necessary) and rather than including the placement on the normal artwork, instead add a note in the instructions (or a separate sheet) describing the issue ("we're not allowed to display this on the box due to legal restrictions ...") and how to use the decals ("for greater accuracy ..."). Would that be sufficient to protect the product from the legal restrictions? (I have no idea.)

Of course, if the legal restrictions prevent the swastika artwork from appearing anywhere in the product (even on the inside) the above suggestion would be of little use, unless it was text-only (which may not be very helpful). And if the laws are that restrictive, then Airfix's omission of the swastikas would be the exact opposite of "inexcusable".


Bruce Probst
Melbourne, Australia
My modelling portfoliohttp://airfixtributeforum.myfastforum.o ... 22022.html
fighters stated that no swastikas were included on the decal sheet because the symbol "is considered undemocratic." Didn't bother me too much then and it doesn't bother me at all now. I've got probably hundreds of variously sized and configured swastikas on after market or spare sheets.
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Joined: May 26th, 2005, 5:39 am

August 23rd, 2013, 6:32 am #6

Just a thought ....

The reviewer notes that he considers it "inexcusable" that the kit decal sheet does not provide any swastikas, even in "broken" form as some other manufacturers use to get around the various product laws. He's entitled to his opinion, but "inexcusable" seems a little harsh to me. Rather than just blast the product for this omission, perhaps the reviewer could provide a suggestion to Airfix to enable them to work around the fact that if they provide a swastika on the decal sheet, they need to show where it is placed on the kit: the artwork for that being displayed prominently on the back of the box (this being a Series 1 kit).

I would suggest that there are two types of customers who will purchase this kit (or have it purchased for them): those who don't care, and those who do. The former are self-explanatory, and very likely will primarily consist of younger modellers. For those who do, I would suggest that this probably won't be their first WW2 German aircraft kit and it's unlikely that they won't have come across this problem before; they will already have plenty of spares available, or know where to go to purchase them on sheets available from numerous manufacturers.

Still, there may be a workaround that Airfix (and other companies) could use: provide the swastika decals in the kit (in "broken" form if necessary) and rather than including the placement on the normal artwork, instead add a note in the instructions (or a separate sheet) describing the issue ("we're not allowed to display this on the box due to legal restrictions ...") and how to use the decals ("for greater accuracy ..."). Would that be sufficient to protect the product from the legal restrictions? (I have no idea.)

Of course, if the legal restrictions prevent the swastika artwork from appearing anywhere in the product (even on the inside) the above suggestion would be of little use, unless it was text-only (which may not be very helpful). And if the laws are that restrictive, then Airfix's omission of the swastikas would be the exact opposite of "inexcusable".


Bruce Probst
Melbourne, Australia
My modelling portfoliohttp://airfixtributeforum.myfastforum.o ... 22022.html
There are obvious business reasons why they didn't. As for fragmenting the marking, that's fine for a kit aimed at enthusiasts, but your average schoolboy would have no idea what do do with fragments, and explicit instructions on how to assemble same would probably run up against the same issues commercially.

As long as we're parsing words, 'inexcusable' is a strange word to use in the case of a model kit, short of a gross misrepresentation of the contents of the box with intent to defraud buyers. OTOH, I've seen plenty of kits that were unacceptable as boxed, and even today we occasionally get kits that are not merely below par, but frankly unacceptable. Subjective as standards go, and this omission might be considered unacceptable by someone who doesn't want to go rummaging through the decal spares looking for just the right Nazi party adornment. That'll never be my issue, as I have ten times more of the things laying around than I will ever use. One more commentary on the utter banality of the symbol at this remove.

"Don't take your life too seriously, son. At the end of it, you won't be alive anyway."

Red Skelton's mother
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Joined: December 29th, 2002, 11:19 am

August 23rd, 2013, 9:12 am #7

(Said tongue in cheek)

But I do think that giving only one scheme, which has a spinner spiral, and then omitting a decal for the spiral is inexcus... um, no, I'll use 'reprehensible.'

Stuart
Inconceivable! -Wallace Shawn (n/t)
"Ignorance is bliss, but I find learning more interesting." - Me, as far as I know
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 23rd, 2013, 9:34 am #8

Just a thought ....

The reviewer notes that he considers it "inexcusable" that the kit decal sheet does not provide any swastikas, even in "broken" form as some other manufacturers use to get around the various product laws. He's entitled to his opinion, but "inexcusable" seems a little harsh to me. Rather than just blast the product for this omission, perhaps the reviewer could provide a suggestion to Airfix to enable them to work around the fact that if they provide a swastika on the decal sheet, they need to show where it is placed on the kit: the artwork for that being displayed prominently on the back of the box (this being a Series 1 kit).

I would suggest that there are two types of customers who will purchase this kit (or have it purchased for them): those who don't care, and those who do. The former are self-explanatory, and very likely will primarily consist of younger modellers. For those who do, I would suggest that this probably won't be their first WW2 German aircraft kit and it's unlikely that they won't have come across this problem before; they will already have plenty of spares available, or know where to go to purchase them on sheets available from numerous manufacturers.

Still, there may be a workaround that Airfix (and other companies) could use: provide the swastika decals in the kit (in "broken" form if necessary) and rather than including the placement on the normal artwork, instead add a note in the instructions (or a separate sheet) describing the issue ("we're not allowed to display this on the box due to legal restrictions ...") and how to use the decals ("for greater accuracy ..."). Would that be sufficient to protect the product from the legal restrictions? (I have no idea.)

Of course, if the legal restrictions prevent the swastika artwork from appearing anywhere in the product (even on the inside) the above suggestion would be of little use, unless it was text-only (which may not be very helpful). And if the laws are that restrictive, then Airfix's omission of the swastikas would be the exact opposite of "inexcusable".


Bruce Probst
Melbourne, Australia
My modelling portfoliohttp://airfixtributeforum.myfastforum.o ... 22022.html
Hi all,

I am always impressed with Mark Davies' reviews.

He is thorough, he provides relevant background on the subject, comparisons with existing kits where possible, he describes the high points and he never glosses over the low points of a model.

He also provides ample photos for the modeller to decide whether they agree with his conclusions or otherwise.

In this case, I think we can assume the use of the word "inexcusable" is a personal opinion (i.e. Mark can't excuse Airfix for not including hakenkreuz decals). I dont really think that he is demanding that everyone else boycott the company.

His conclusion makes it very clear that he thinks this is the best 1/72 scale Fw 190 A-8 kit available today, so I think we should couch the use of that one "inexcusable" word in that context.

Bye for now,

Brett





Brett Green - Editor
HyperScale
http://www.hyperscale.com
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Joined: January 17th, 2003, 8:40 pm

August 23rd, 2013, 9:57 am #9

Just a thought ....

The reviewer notes that he considers it "inexcusable" that the kit decal sheet does not provide any swastikas, even in "broken" form as some other manufacturers use to get around the various product laws. He's entitled to his opinion, but "inexcusable" seems a little harsh to me. Rather than just blast the product for this omission, perhaps the reviewer could provide a suggestion to Airfix to enable them to work around the fact that if they provide a swastika on the decal sheet, they need to show where it is placed on the kit: the artwork for that being displayed prominently on the back of the box (this being a Series 1 kit).

I would suggest that there are two types of customers who will purchase this kit (or have it purchased for them): those who don't care, and those who do. The former are self-explanatory, and very likely will primarily consist of younger modellers. For those who do, I would suggest that this probably won't be their first WW2 German aircraft kit and it's unlikely that they won't have come across this problem before; they will already have plenty of spares available, or know where to go to purchase them on sheets available from numerous manufacturers.

Still, there may be a workaround that Airfix (and other companies) could use: provide the swastika decals in the kit (in "broken" form if necessary) and rather than including the placement on the normal artwork, instead add a note in the instructions (or a separate sheet) describing the issue ("we're not allowed to display this on the box due to legal restrictions ...") and how to use the decals ("for greater accuracy ..."). Would that be sufficient to protect the product from the legal restrictions? (I have no idea.)

Of course, if the legal restrictions prevent the swastika artwork from appearing anywhere in the product (even on the inside) the above suggestion would be of little use, unless it was text-only (which may not be very helpful). And if the laws are that restrictive, then Airfix's omission of the swastikas would be the exact opposite of "inexcusable".


Bruce Probst
Melbourne, Australia
My modelling portfoliohttp://airfixtributeforum.myfastforum.o ... 22022.html
"Swatikas" have been banned for some time now, and kit brands have been very succesful in findings way around the ban to comply with it and at the same time providing a complete and accurate set of markings. Examples are in the thousands; probably the most evident are those kits representing Finnish WW2-period subjects.
Besides, the suggestion to make a proposal to the producers, AFTER the kit is released moreover, is nothing short of ridiculous; CEOs are reputedly impenetrable to such actions (we know, persons of my acquaintance have tried to contact them on the A-4B's Argentinean markings decals).
I do not consider it a "bashing", or at least an "illegitimate" one. It is a very appropriate point made.
Fernando
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Joined: May 20th, 2013, 3:24 pm

August 23rd, 2013, 10:32 am #10

Why then is it still possible to display the swastika on preserved aircraft in Germany - surely plastic models of historic subjects fall into the same category

sk
Simon King
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