Cockpit Detailing.

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Cockpit Detailing.

Joined: March 27th, 2008, 8:26 pm

May 2nd, 2012, 2:51 pm #1

Browsing the galleries I see the QF-4 of David Aungst and can't believe he did the cockpit scratch. I have been getting back into the hobby and improving my skills from long ago through reading and research and practice. I understand how folks detail interiors with strip, sheet and rod but to look at his cockpit I have to ask what does one use to make all those switches and knobs and circuit breakers?? (Besides an enormous magnifiying glass). Truly impressive work and a level of skill I can work towards.
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Joined: July 16th, 2004, 7:46 pm

May 2nd, 2012, 3:20 pm #2

my scratchbuilding work.

I did most of the scratchbuilt patterns for Cutting Edge/Meteor Productions, True Details, Jaguar, plus some other guys stuff thrown in there.

Magnifying glass or glasses make me dizzy/sick.
It's pure raw eyesight for me and yes I am 42.

I use Waldron punch and dies, Plastruct white styrene rod and Evergreen white styrene strips, plus plain old sheet plastic for most of my pattern work.

This combinied with a lot of patience and a very steady hand.

Sincerely
Scotty Battistoni
Master pattern maker
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 4:14 am

May 2nd, 2012, 4:01 pm #3

Like you, my eyes were fine until I was about 44. The decline over the last 5 years has been impressive.

I'm now using bi-focals, an optivisor, and as much light as I can possibly cram over my bench!

While your eyes may not do the same, I'd still say enjoy it while you can!

Mike
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Joined: April 26th, 2007, 11:53 pm

May 2nd, 2012, 4:23 pm #4

I'm 43 and my near vision started going to crap about a year and a half ago. Now I use reading glasses when working on models. 1.50 power works good for me. My far vision is still excellent.

Roy
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Joined: January 30th, 2004, 2:49 am

May 2nd, 2012, 4:31 pm #5

my scratchbuilding work.

I did most of the scratchbuilt patterns for Cutting Edge/Meteor Productions, True Details, Jaguar, plus some other guys stuff thrown in there.

Magnifying glass or glasses make me dizzy/sick.
It's pure raw eyesight for me and yes I am 42.

I use Waldron punch and dies, Plastruct white styrene rod and Evergreen white styrene strips, plus plain old sheet plastic for most of my pattern work.

This combinied with a lot of patience and a very steady hand.

Sincerely
Scotty Battistoni
Master pattern maker
n/m
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 3:08 pm

May 2nd, 2012, 4:44 pm #6

my scratchbuilding work.

I did most of the scratchbuilt patterns for Cutting Edge/Meteor Productions, True Details, Jaguar, plus some other guys stuff thrown in there.

Magnifying glass or glasses make me dizzy/sick.
It's pure raw eyesight for me and yes I am 42.

I use Waldron punch and dies, Plastruct white styrene rod and Evergreen white styrene strips, plus plain old sheet plastic for most of my pattern work.

This combinied with a lot of patience and a very steady hand.

Sincerely
Scotty Battistoni
Master pattern maker
....I'm certifiably nuts.
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Joined: February 28th, 2005, 5:27 am

May 2nd, 2012, 4:57 pm #7

Like you, my eyes were fine until I was about 44. The decline over the last 5 years has been impressive.

I'm now using bi-focals, an optivisor, and as much light as I can possibly cram over my bench!

While your eyes may not do the same, I'd still say enjoy it while you can!

Mike
I'm 45 and I think that is the sign for me that things are starting to go.

My vision is still better than 20/20 for distance and I have had no problems with any detailing EXCEPT that I find that I need brighter light to assist with contrast.
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Joined: October 24th, 2007, 10:03 pm

May 2nd, 2012, 5:45 pm #8

n/m
Resistance is futile! :) n/t
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Joined: May 26th, 2005, 5:39 am

May 2nd, 2012, 6:34 pm #9

Like you, my eyes were fine until I was about 44. The decline over the last 5 years has been impressive.

I'm now using bi-focals, an optivisor, and as much light as I can possibly cram over my bench!

While your eyes may not do the same, I'd still say enjoy it while you can!

Mike
59 and I don't need more than a lot of light to deal with 1/72 detail in a cockpit. I don't much like doing it, but when I do it, it works out well. It's good that there are tools like Optivisors for those who need them--luckily, I'm exempt to this point.

"Don't take your life too seriously, son. At the end of it, you won't be alive anyway."

Red Skelton's mother
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Joined: January 26th, 2004, 7:42 pm

May 2nd, 2012, 8:14 pm #10

Browsing the galleries I see the QF-4 of David Aungst and can't believe he did the cockpit scratch. I have been getting back into the hobby and improving my skills from long ago through reading and research and practice. I understand how folks detail interiors with strip, sheet and rod but to look at his cockpit I have to ask what does one use to make all those switches and knobs and circuit breakers?? (Besides an enormous magnifiying glass). Truly impressive work and a level of skill I can work towards.
what seemed decent work was not so grand once those digicam shots were blown up to full screen.

I bought a desk mounted lamp/magnifying window, and the quality of the fime details improved quite a bit.

It was like I was a teen again (in some ways...)
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