Breguet AG-4, September, 1914, Scratch-Build In 1/72 (W.I.P.)

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Breguet AG-4, September, 1914, Scratch-Build In 1/72 (W.I.P.)

Joined: September 9th, 2004, 3:43 am

July 18th, 2012, 9:52 pm #1

This machine was pretty much a one-off, only two ever being constructed. M. Breguet flew his prototype AG-4 to the Entrenched Camp of Paris to join a motely collection of aeroplanes available there at the end of August, 1914. On the 2nd of September, he made a reconnaissance flight with Lt. Watteau as observer, during which the first signs of the German general von Kluck's turning the extreme right of the German forces to pass to the east of Paris were detected. This was the germ from which the subsequent riposte of the First Battle of the Marne would come, which makes this one of the most significant aerial missions of history, and gives the AG.4, wretched a flying machine as it was, an important place in aviation history.



I will be doing this machine as it appeared (or as I think it appeared, anyway) during its historic flight, with the tail surfaces shown in the photograph above (they were later altered), but without the service markings (the machine was still M. Breguet's property when that flight was made).

Here are the wings...



Here, the full suit of ribs have been sanded in.



Here, the scallops of the trailing edges have been put in.



Here the rib tapes are on the upper wing (only every third rib was taped), and the whole sprayed with primer.



Here is the lower wing, split into separate panels joined by bare spar (the front from paper-clip wire), with tapes on, and sprayed with primer.


The AG-4 used the 160hp Gnome twin-row rotary. I am using the twin-row Oberursel from an ICM Pfalz E-IV kit. This fits the cowling in the kit very well, but that is awfully thick, so I extended the length of the cylinders by adding caps of 1mm sheet, and trimmed off the lifter riods moulded to the front of each cylinder. The crankcase front of the kit piece is flat, so I gave it a bit of a dome from 2.5mm tube. To the cylinder heads, I added lifters from .5mm x .25mm strip, and put in lifter rods from .25mm round rod. Here is the result, greatly magnified, after a coat of primer.



The forward part of the AG-4 fuselage was armored, its rearward portion was of standard construction. I have made the fuselage in two sections....



Since the Pfalz cowl matched the drawing dimensions, I have used it as a sort of gauge for the front plate here.



Here the bottom is assembled to the upper frame.



Here is the rear portion's lower part, together with the forward piece.



I put a 'cap' on the front of the rear piece, to provide a rear to the cockpit area and give something to grip at that point when working the assembly later, and to ease some oddities of their juncture.





Once these were were glued together, I rounded the cap to a proper shape, and laid in the turtle-back, from a piece of 3mm sheet (a thin wedge of scrap left from making the wings of a Hawker Demon late last year), and bit of 1.5mm sheet. The 3mm piece was sanded to a slat first, then the 1.5mm piece was put on, and sanded down to final slant. Then the proper contour was put in.

I expect the next step will be doing the interior.
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Joined: June 11th, 2011, 9:54 pm

July 18th, 2012, 10:36 pm #2

That is a movie quote from Clark Gable. You never cease to amaze me. You are a modeler. Most of the rest of us are kit-bashers at best. What paint will you use to replicate the clear doped linen? Adios, Larry.

Field Artillery brings dignity to what otherwise might be merely a vulgar brawl.
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Joined: April 2nd, 2007, 11:33 pm

July 19th, 2012, 5:55 pm #3

This machine was pretty much a one-off, only two ever being constructed. M. Breguet flew his prototype AG-4 to the Entrenched Camp of Paris to join a motely collection of aeroplanes available there at the end of August, 1914. On the 2nd of September, he made a reconnaissance flight with Lt. Watteau as observer, during which the first signs of the German general von Kluck's turning the extreme right of the German forces to pass to the east of Paris were detected. This was the germ from which the subsequent riposte of the First Battle of the Marne would come, which makes this one of the most significant aerial missions of history, and gives the AG.4, wretched a flying machine as it was, an important place in aviation history.



I will be doing this machine as it appeared (or as I think it appeared, anyway) during its historic flight, with the tail surfaces shown in the photograph above (they were later altered), but without the service markings (the machine was still M. Breguet's property when that flight was made).

Here are the wings...



Here, the full suit of ribs have been sanded in.



Here, the scallops of the trailing edges have been put in.



Here the rib tapes are on the upper wing (only every third rib was taped), and the whole sprayed with primer.



Here is the lower wing, split into separate panels joined by bare spar (the front from paper-clip wire), with tapes on, and sprayed with primer.


The AG-4 used the 160hp Gnome twin-row rotary. I am using the twin-row Oberursel from an ICM Pfalz E-IV kit. This fits the cowling in the kit very well, but that is awfully thick, so I extended the length of the cylinders by adding caps of 1mm sheet, and trimmed off the lifter riods moulded to the front of each cylinder. The crankcase front of the kit piece is flat, so I gave it a bit of a dome from 2.5mm tube. To the cylinder heads, I added lifters from .5mm x .25mm strip, and put in lifter rods from .25mm round rod. Here is the result, greatly magnified, after a coat of primer.



The forward part of the AG-4 fuselage was armored, its rearward portion was of standard construction. I have made the fuselage in two sections....



Since the Pfalz cowl matched the drawing dimensions, I have used it as a sort of gauge for the front plate here.



Here the bottom is assembled to the upper frame.



Here is the rear portion's lower part, together with the forward piece.



I put a 'cap' on the front of the rear piece, to provide a rear to the cockpit area and give something to grip at that point when working the assembly later, and to ease some oddities of their juncture.





Once these were were glued together, I rounded the cap to a proper shape, and laid in the turtle-back, from a piece of 3mm sheet (a thin wedge of scrap left from making the wings of a Hawker Demon late last year), and bit of 1.5mm sheet. The 3mm piece was sanded to a slat first, then the 1.5mm piece was put on, and sanded down to final slant. Then the proper contour was put in.

I expect the next step will be doing the interior.
I've loved following this thing on the WWI sight. Great to see it over here.

You have really made some great progress!!!!

Regards,

Dan From Tacoma, Washington USA
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Joined: September 9th, 2004, 3:43 am

July 19th, 2012, 6:06 pm #4

That is a movie quote from Clark Gable. You never cease to amaze me. You are a modeler. Most of the rest of us are kit-bashers at best. What paint will you use to replicate the clear doped linen? Adios, Larry.

Field Artillery brings dignity to what otherwise might be merely a vulgar brawl.
This one is kind of a labor of love. I have wanted to build a model of this one for years, owing to its historic significance, but information on the type is scarce. The first time I set my cap to build it, I wound up doing this instead, as it was only on the earlier Breguets I could find enough for a build....



Only over the last year did I come across enough information to make it seem possible to do a build of the AG-4 itself.

At present, I find I am using PollyScale 'Old Concrete' for clear-doped un-bleached linen, but I have used a variety of mixes. You want to keep browns and tans that add a reddish note out of mixes for this; it goes all wrong if it shifts towards red....
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Joined: September 9th, 2004, 3:43 am

July 19th, 2012, 6:12 pm #5

I've loved following this thing on the WWI sight. Great to see it over here.

You have really made some great progress!!!!

Regards,

Dan From Tacoma, Washington USA
I will be working more on this now than I have: I took most of June in attempting to get this done by the Fourth of July....



Then I had to finish my Curtiss below for a group build deadline of July 10.

I am hoping to get this squared away by the end of August....
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Joined: April 17th, 2012, 3:47 am

July 20th, 2012, 12:29 am #6

This machine was pretty much a one-off, only two ever being constructed. M. Breguet flew his prototype AG-4 to the Entrenched Camp of Paris to join a motely collection of aeroplanes available there at the end of August, 1914. On the 2nd of September, he made a reconnaissance flight with Lt. Watteau as observer, during which the first signs of the German general von Kluck's turning the extreme right of the German forces to pass to the east of Paris were detected. This was the germ from which the subsequent riposte of the First Battle of the Marne would come, which makes this one of the most significant aerial missions of history, and gives the AG.4, wretched a flying machine as it was, an important place in aviation history.



I will be doing this machine as it appeared (or as I think it appeared, anyway) during its historic flight, with the tail surfaces shown in the photograph above (they were later altered), but without the service markings (the machine was still M. Breguet's property when that flight was made).

Here are the wings...



Here, the full suit of ribs have been sanded in.



Here, the scallops of the trailing edges have been put in.



Here the rib tapes are on the upper wing (only every third rib was taped), and the whole sprayed with primer.



Here is the lower wing, split into separate panels joined by bare spar (the front from paper-clip wire), with tapes on, and sprayed with primer.


The AG-4 used the 160hp Gnome twin-row rotary. I am using the twin-row Oberursel from an ICM Pfalz E-IV kit. This fits the cowling in the kit very well, but that is awfully thick, so I extended the length of the cylinders by adding caps of 1mm sheet, and trimmed off the lifter riods moulded to the front of each cylinder. The crankcase front of the kit piece is flat, so I gave it a bit of a dome from 2.5mm tube. To the cylinder heads, I added lifters from .5mm x .25mm strip, and put in lifter rods from .25mm round rod. Here is the result, greatly magnified, after a coat of primer.



The forward part of the AG-4 fuselage was armored, its rearward portion was of standard construction. I have made the fuselage in two sections....



Since the Pfalz cowl matched the drawing dimensions, I have used it as a sort of gauge for the front plate here.



Here the bottom is assembled to the upper frame.



Here is the rear portion's lower part, together with the forward piece.



I put a 'cap' on the front of the rear piece, to provide a rear to the cockpit area and give something to grip at that point when working the assembly later, and to ease some oddities of their juncture.





Once these were were glued together, I rounded the cap to a proper shape, and laid in the turtle-back, from a piece of 3mm sheet (a thin wedge of scrap left from making the wings of a Hawker Demon late last year), and bit of 1.5mm sheet. The 3mm piece was sanded to a slat first, then the 1.5mm piece was put on, and sanded down to final slant. Then the proper contour was put in.

I expect the next step will be doing the interior.
I can't wait to see this one completed. Keep up the good work. Looks like the wings took forever to get to that stage

John
Elkhart, Indiana
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Joined: April 17th, 2012, 3:47 am

July 20th, 2012, 12:30 am #7

I've loved following this thing on the WWI sight. Great to see it over here.

You have really made some great progress!!!!

Regards,

Dan From Tacoma, Washington USA
There's a WWI site?
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Joined: September 9th, 2004, 3:43 am

July 20th, 2012, 3:13 am #8

There were some major upsets on 'The Aerodrome Forum', which led the owner to close down their modeling forum, even though it was one of the highest trafficked areas of the site. Since than two have sprung up:

The Great War in the Air Forum:

http://www.greatwaraviation.com/forum/index.php

WWI Aircraft Models Forum:

http://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/

The first is a bit larger; the second more closely dedicated to modeling. Both are excellent and friendly places, well worth a look if you are interested in the subject.
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Joined: September 9th, 2004, 3:43 am

July 20th, 2012, 3:16 am #9

I can't wait to see this one completed. Keep up the good work. Looks like the wings took forever to get to that stage

John
Elkhart, Indiana
Thank you.

The wings did indeed take a while, but in fairness their were more laborious than difficult.
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 1:55 am

July 22nd, 2012, 3:13 am #10

This machine was pretty much a one-off, only two ever being constructed. M. Breguet flew his prototype AG-4 to the Entrenched Camp of Paris to join a motely collection of aeroplanes available there at the end of August, 1914. On the 2nd of September, he made a reconnaissance flight with Lt. Watteau as observer, during which the first signs of the German general von Kluck's turning the extreme right of the German forces to pass to the east of Paris were detected. This was the germ from which the subsequent riposte of the First Battle of the Marne would come, which makes this one of the most significant aerial missions of history, and gives the AG.4, wretched a flying machine as it was, an important place in aviation history.



I will be doing this machine as it appeared (or as I think it appeared, anyway) during its historic flight, with the tail surfaces shown in the photograph above (they were later altered), but without the service markings (the machine was still M. Breguet's property when that flight was made).

Here are the wings...



Here, the full suit of ribs have been sanded in.



Here, the scallops of the trailing edges have been put in.



Here the rib tapes are on the upper wing (only every third rib was taped), and the whole sprayed with primer.



Here is the lower wing, split into separate panels joined by bare spar (the front from paper-clip wire), with tapes on, and sprayed with primer.


The AG-4 used the 160hp Gnome twin-row rotary. I am using the twin-row Oberursel from an ICM Pfalz E-IV kit. This fits the cowling in the kit very well, but that is awfully thick, so I extended the length of the cylinders by adding caps of 1mm sheet, and trimmed off the lifter riods moulded to the front of each cylinder. The crankcase front of the kit piece is flat, so I gave it a bit of a dome from 2.5mm tube. To the cylinder heads, I added lifters from .5mm x .25mm strip, and put in lifter rods from .25mm round rod. Here is the result, greatly magnified, after a coat of primer.



The forward part of the AG-4 fuselage was armored, its rearward portion was of standard construction. I have made the fuselage in two sections....



Since the Pfalz cowl matched the drawing dimensions, I have used it as a sort of gauge for the front plate here.



Here the bottom is assembled to the upper frame.



Here is the rear portion's lower part, together with the forward piece.



I put a 'cap' on the front of the rear piece, to provide a rear to the cockpit area and give something to grip at that point when working the assembly later, and to ease some oddities of their juncture.





Once these were were glued together, I rounded the cap to a proper shape, and laid in the turtle-back, from a piece of 3mm sheet (a thin wedge of scrap left from making the wings of a Hawker Demon late last year), and bit of 1.5mm sheet. The 3mm piece was sanded to a slat first, then the 1.5mm piece was put on, and sanded down to final slant. Then the proper contour was put in.

I expect the next step will be doing the interior.
I learned a lot about scratch-building WWI aircraft, I have two new websites to check out and I saw a Breguets I for the first time in your excellent model.
Very good, Sir.
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