Are there any Semi-truck drivers amongst us??? I have a Q. n/t

Are there any Semi-truck drivers amongst us??? I have a Q. n/t

Joined: November 21st, 2011, 10:30 pm

April 26th, 2012, 5:22 pm #1

Are there any Semi-truck drivers amongst us??? I have a Q. n/t
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 12:37 am

April 26th, 2012, 5:41 pm #2

I can answer your Q. All but a year or so of my 36 years was in log trucks here in the Pacific Northwest, though.

Cheers, Terry
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Joined: November 21st, 2011, 10:30 pm

April 26th, 2012, 6:01 pm #3

I travel from the Detroit area and drive I-94W to Chicago. Roughly 360 miles and about a 4 1/2 hour drive for me.
My question is:

Why is it when two semi trucks are in the right lane, the trailing truck will pull out in to the left lane with the INTENT of passing the lead truck. The "passing" truck barely exceeds the leading trucks speed and it will take 10 miles of these two trucks hogging both lanes at 5-10 mph under the speed limit which back up traffic for quite some time until the passing truck FINALLY gets in front of the slower truck.
I see this action many times and it is so annoying. If you are going to pass someone, then dang-it, pass em'!!! Don't idle past the lead truck for 10 miles!! THEN, after this "10 mile" passing exercise, the passing truck is now going 5-10 mph under the limit and the process starts all over again!! WHY???

Is this a tactic truckers use to regulate traffic flow & speeds?? It certainly is not a way to get to point "B" any faster! Since it appears that it is not, then just stay in the right lane!! Why pass if you are not in a hurry to get there!!!

I always meant to ask a trucker this same question if I met one at a State Rest Area. Never materialized.

Any help??
Thanks Terry!!

Sincere regards,
Larry @ AUDI
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 2:45 am

April 26th, 2012, 6:09 pm #4

...the truck passing has enough h.p. to start the pass but not enough to complete it. I drove a small box truck for a few years and had this problem ALL the time. You can get a draft off the leading truck but once you hit that wall of air he is pushing it is like you have the brakes on.

Dry fit, don't fit, fix fit.

Google IS your friend.

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Joined: April 25th, 2011, 2:27 pm

April 26th, 2012, 6:29 pm #5

I travel from the Detroit area and drive I-94W to Chicago. Roughly 360 miles and about a 4 1/2 hour drive for me.
My question is:

Why is it when two semi trucks are in the right lane, the trailing truck will pull out in to the left lane with the INTENT of passing the lead truck. The "passing" truck barely exceeds the leading trucks speed and it will take 10 miles of these two trucks hogging both lanes at 5-10 mph under the speed limit which back up traffic for quite some time until the passing truck FINALLY gets in front of the slower truck.
I see this action many times and it is so annoying. If you are going to pass someone, then dang-it, pass em'!!! Don't idle past the lead truck for 10 miles!! THEN, after this "10 mile" passing exercise, the passing truck is now going 5-10 mph under the limit and the process starts all over again!! WHY???

Is this a tactic truckers use to regulate traffic flow & speeds?? It certainly is not a way to get to point "B" any faster! Since it appears that it is not, then just stay in the right lane!! Why pass if you are not in a hurry to get there!!!

I always meant to ask a trucker this same question if I met one at a State Rest Area. Never materialized.

Any help??
Thanks Terry!!

Sincere regards,
Larry @ AUDI
LOL!!! And I thought it was just to PO me!!! LOL!! N/T
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Joined: November 21st, 2011, 10:30 pm

April 26th, 2012, 6:32 pm #6

...the truck passing has enough h.p. to start the pass but not enough to complete it. I drove a small box truck for a few years and had this problem ALL the time. You can get a draft off the leading truck but once you hit that wall of air he is pushing it is like you have the brakes on.

Dry fit, don't fit, fix fit.

Google IS your friend.
in a Freight-liner truck with a loaded 45 foot trailer full of Prince Macaroni Large stuffing shells could present an issue of not being able to pass. Since I believe that the driver knows this small piece of information, especially since he drives that same truck 50 hours a week every week and knows it is a dog, that he would refrain from passing attempts and stay put in the right lane. But NO, he has to try passing anyways.
Just my point of view.
I do not remember seeing a 1950's Peter-built chasing a 1970ish Dodge Dart with a 225 slant 6 with a Dennis Weaver look-alike at a flat out speed of 90 mph rolling down the Interstate lately....

Regards,
Larry
Last edited by audiguy on April 26th, 2012, 6:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: November 1st, 2006, 9:07 pm

April 26th, 2012, 7:12 pm #7

I travel from the Detroit area and drive I-94W to Chicago. Roughly 360 miles and about a 4 1/2 hour drive for me.
My question is:

Why is it when two semi trucks are in the right lane, the trailing truck will pull out in to the left lane with the INTENT of passing the lead truck. The "passing" truck barely exceeds the leading trucks speed and it will take 10 miles of these two trucks hogging both lanes at 5-10 mph under the speed limit which back up traffic for quite some time until the passing truck FINALLY gets in front of the slower truck.
I see this action many times and it is so annoying. If you are going to pass someone, then dang-it, pass em'!!! Don't idle past the lead truck for 10 miles!! THEN, after this "10 mile" passing exercise, the passing truck is now going 5-10 mph under the limit and the process starts all over again!! WHY???

Is this a tactic truckers use to regulate traffic flow & speeds?? It certainly is not a way to get to point "B" any faster! Since it appears that it is not, then just stay in the right lane!! Why pass if you are not in a hurry to get there!!!

I always meant to ask a trucker this same question if I met one at a State Rest Area. Never materialized.

Any help??
Thanks Terry!!

Sincere regards,
Larry @ AUDI
couldn't take enough pressure of the accelerator to slow down the fraction of a mph faster he was going to match the speed of the truck he was following.

And as said though he thought he could, he didn't have the power to get past fast enough to the liking of those four wheelers who are being allowed to use the truckers roadways.

There used to be a truck and trucker in Montana that drove a vintage Peterbilt, '60s era I believe. Now this truck wasn't what it appeared to be...a classic old semi meticulously restore. No, under the cab and hood was a modern powerhouse and drive train as well as state of the art suspension. The drivers motto was, I can pass anything, anytime and anywhere. He'd routinely pass a string of other trucks and cars while climbing up any one of the mountain passes leading through the Rockies. He even passed me while I was on my motorcycle climbing up Rogers Pass (Hwy 200) near Lincoln, MT. I was doing 70mph up the hill and he went by me doing over 100mph with fully loaded 53' trailer! I think it might have had something to do with the twin turbo superchargers. He didn't measure mpg...but gpm!
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Joined: August 13th, 2005, 6:05 pm

April 26th, 2012, 7:44 pm #8

Are there any Semi-truck drivers amongst us??? I have a Q. n/t
the rear truck isn't having to punch a hole through a wall of air, so seems to be catching the front truck...but when he pulls out to overtake, he then DOES hit the wall of air and his speed then matches the other truck - especially if both trucks have speed limiters fitted (set at 56mph here in the UK)

Graeme
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Joined: March 15th, 2003, 5:09 am

April 26th, 2012, 8:35 pm #9

Are there any Semi-truck drivers amongst us??? I have a Q. n/t
nt


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Joined: January 21st, 2003, 7:03 pm

April 26th, 2012, 9:32 pm #10

Are there any Semi-truck drivers amongst us??? I have a Q. n/t
and follow the truck he is trying to pass? After all, he really not going to be going that much slower, right? Well, look at it from the trucker's perspective. He is probably getting paid by the mile, and every mile he can squeeze in puts a little more money in his pocket. If passing that other truck allows him to get ten additional miles over the course of his day, he has made enough to buy another gallon of fuel and a candy bar.
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