Anyone here using CO2 tanks for airbrushing?

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Anyone here using CO2 tanks for airbrushing?

Joined: August 9th, 2005, 5:55 am

April 9th, 2012, 8:57 pm #1

And if so, what type are you using? How do you like it compared to a standard compressor? How big a tank are you using? Etc.
All comments welcome....
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Joined: April 4th, 2006, 7:00 pm

April 9th, 2012, 9:07 pm #2

Use the "Search" function, enter "compressor" then sort by "date." There was a discussion just two weeks ago.

http://www.network54.com/Forum/149674/t ... ggestions-



Cheers,

Lee G.
Last edited by leegee_77 on April 9th, 2012, 9:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 5th, 2005, 10:53 pm

April 9th, 2012, 9:07 pm #3

And if so, what type are you using? How do you like it compared to a standard compressor? How big a tank are you using? Etc.
All comments welcome....
It is quieter and drier than a compressor, delivers great results. I really recommend it.

You will need to most likely buy your first tank, and a high pressure, dual-stage regulator, but after that you just pay for the refills on the tanks. I spend about $20 - $25 every 1.5 - 2 years.

HTH

Scott G
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Joined: March 2nd, 2005, 3:52 pm

April 9th, 2012, 9:19 pm #4

And if so, what type are you using? How do you like it compared to a standard compressor? How big a tank are you using? Etc.
All comments welcome....
I got a Badger regulator for about $50 from Amazon. The CO2 tank (full) was about $180 (shop around - prices vary wildly). It's totally silent, zero moisture, and a knee high tank will last a long time. And don't believe anyone who says you need two regulators stepped-down (one for high and one for low pressure). It's absolutely not true. The regulator I got from Amazon is designed for airbrushing using a CO2 tank.
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Joined: February 15th, 2009, 5:46 am

April 9th, 2012, 9:19 pm #5

And if so, what type are you using? How do you like it compared to a standard compressor? How big a tank are you using? Etc.
All comments welcome....
...which means it holds 20 pounds of CO2. It actually weighs about 40 lbs when full. I get about 18 months to 2 years to a refill, which are usually under $20. Any beverage distributor or welding supply shop should be able to sell you the cylinder and two-stage regulator and refill or exchange the cylinders when empty.
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 10:26 pm

April 9th, 2012, 9:25 pm #6

Other than "two stage regulator" are there any other regulator requirements I should be asking for? I was going to buy a compressor but am thinking of going down the CO2 route 'cos it'll be much quieter...but want to ensure I get the right gear.

Thanks,
Mark
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Joined: February 8th, 2008, 6:54 pm

April 9th, 2012, 9:29 pm #7

And if so, what type are you using? How do you like it compared to a standard compressor? How big a tank are you using? Etc.
All comments welcome....
nt
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Joined: February 15th, 2009, 5:46 am

April 9th, 2012, 9:50 pm #8

Other than "two stage regulator" are there any other regulator requirements I should be asking for? I was going to buy a compressor but am thinking of going down the CO2 route 'cos it'll be much quieter...but want to ensure I get the right gear.

Thanks,
Mark
gauge is suitable for typical airbrush pressures. Should read 100 to 60 psi max and have markings for the 0-20 psi range, some gauges end at 10 or 20 psi. Most places will make up the regulator to your specs. Get the proper fitting on the output (typically 1/4" NPT). Mine had a compression fitting that was seized stuck and I had to rig it up with some tubing and an adapter to fit my hose and it leaks a tiny bit and wastes gas. I do use a quick-disconnect fitting on all my ab's, so I don't waste gas when cleaning or switching ab's.
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Joined: March 2nd, 2005, 3:52 pm

April 9th, 2012, 10:05 pm #9

Other than "two stage regulator" are there any other regulator requirements I should be asking for? I was going to buy a compressor but am thinking of going down the CO2 route 'cos it'll be much quieter...but want to ensure I get the right gear.

Thanks,
Mark
.
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Joined: May 4th, 2005, 6:32 pm

April 9th, 2012, 10:43 pm #10

And if so, what type are you using? How do you like it compared to a standard compressor? How big a tank are you using? Etc.
All comments welcome....
Got my tank, regulators and first fill at a fire supplies shop years ago. Welding shops can set you up as well. Zero noise, zero humidity as the gas is dry so you don't need moisture traps on your hose, no breakdowns, and completely portable. You don't need to maintain proximity to an electrical outlet. A roadtrip down the PCH to Big Sur finds my modeling stuff in the trunk and I can spray on the beach with my tank. A bit more expensive on the initial outlay but well worth all the advantages CO2 has over a compressor (in fact, I don't think compressors have any advantages). And, the way things are going up in price, a good compressor ain't cheap anymore either. Also, you can load it up with nitrous oxide instead of CO2 and go flying all by your bad self, without benefit of aircraft...
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