A member of my church served in Korea and he told me ...

A member of my church served in Korea and he told me ...

Joined: February 27th, 2005, 4:23 am

May 17th, 2012, 6:59 pm #1

his history and I was wondering if others more into armor could fill me in please?

Hi name is Ray Morgan and I think he is close to 80 yrs young.

Jan 1951 Started
May 1951 Shipped to Japan to train
Feb 6th 1952 deployed to Korea
oct 1952 came home and out Dec 7th 1952.

I know nothing of the structre of the USA so this is what he told me:

224 Regiment
40th Division
Charlie Company
4th platoon (a weapons) platoon he said.

He was on a team manning a 57 mm recoiless rifle, he said the rounds weighed 6 pounds each! He carried 6 to 8 on his person.

He said his squad had 6 soldiers. Squad leader, a sgt.,l gunner(corporal),1 loader(corporal),3 ammo bearers(privates)


He started as a bearer and moved to loader when the several members were rotated stateside.

He said the N.Koreans didn't engage them much but when they were relieved by S.Koreans the fighting really increased, then when they roated back in, the N. Koreans didn't engage. He thought it was due to the USA being better trained and the N. Koreans being afraid to engage them too often. I didn't say anything about that since I am a civilian and haven't been in combat.

Ray said the 57 rifle was in short supply and they mainly used a .50 cal machine gun and he said he loved it! There were also a motor crew and he talked about the sound it made and how the infintry on both sides feared the motor attacks. He also talked about flame throwers and was impressed with the weapon.

All in all I had a great time talking with Ray and letting him tell me with obvious pride about his service and how he was glad to return to the USA.

One thing he mentioned frequently was how COLD it was in Korea. When on guard duty the soldier on duty got to wear a parka, they only had enough for the onduty guards to wear, otherwise they wore their field jackets. I think that is why he love living in Texas!

Any more info on the unit and the weapons would be welcomed. Is there a web site for this unit I could share with Ray?

Philip

Philip & Maximilian
Head of Ranch Security, Song Dog, Texas

Where has all the music gone?
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Joined: January 18th, 2007, 6:05 am

May 17th, 2012, 7:18 pm #2

I knew a number of people who served in Korea and one common thread in all their tales was the Cold! And the hills, everything was either up or down, never a straight move from one place to another. Also shortages of ammo and equipment were apparently a common problem.

Bill Shuey
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Joined: June 11th, 2011, 9:54 pm

May 17th, 2012, 7:43 pm #3

his history and I was wondering if others more into armor could fill me in please?

Hi name is Ray Morgan and I think he is close to 80 yrs young.

Jan 1951 Started
May 1951 Shipped to Japan to train
Feb 6th 1952 deployed to Korea
oct 1952 came home and out Dec 7th 1952.

I know nothing of the structre of the USA so this is what he told me:

224 Regiment
40th Division
Charlie Company
4th platoon (a weapons) platoon he said.

He was on a team manning a 57 mm recoiless rifle, he said the rounds weighed 6 pounds each! He carried 6 to 8 on his person.

He said his squad had 6 soldiers. Squad leader, a sgt.,l gunner(corporal),1 loader(corporal),3 ammo bearers(privates)


He started as a bearer and moved to loader when the several members were rotated stateside.

He said the N.Koreans didn't engage them much but when they were relieved by S.Koreans the fighting really increased, then when they roated back in, the N. Koreans didn't engage. He thought it was due to the USA being better trained and the N. Koreans being afraid to engage them too often. I didn't say anything about that since I am a civilian and haven't been in combat.

Ray said the 57 rifle was in short supply and they mainly used a .50 cal machine gun and he said he loved it! There were also a motor crew and he talked about the sound it made and how the infintry on both sides feared the motor attacks. He also talked about flame throwers and was impressed with the weapon.

All in all I had a great time talking with Ray and letting him tell me with obvious pride about his service and how he was glad to return to the USA.

One thing he mentioned frequently was how COLD it was in Korea. When on guard duty the soldier on duty got to wear a parka, they only had enough for the onduty guards to wear, otherwise they wore their field jackets. I think that is why he love living in Texas!

Any more info on the unit and the weapons would be welcomed. Is there a web site for this unit I could share with Ray?

Philip

Philip & Maximilian
Head of Ranch Security, Song Dog, Texas

Where has all the music gone?
It might have been calm a few mornings, but the wind almost always blew and came from the north. I served in an artillery battalion in '73 and '74 including two winters. The second winter was the Arab oil embargo and we stayed in the field on reduced operations because we used much less fuel than when in garrison. I spent a lot of time on Artillery Observation Posts and every one faced north to the impact areas. Because of General Howze's dictum that you can't fight out of a closed vehicle, all of our trucks and jeeps had no windshields or cab canvas. I lived in the wool uniform shirt, field pants with liners. long johns, arctic mittens, "mickey-mouse" cold weather boots , pile cap under my steel pot, and a parka with liner with a fur-rimmed hood. Actuaslly the field gear worked very well except on long convoys. It got bitter cold at the guardposts on the actual DMZ at Panmunjon.. The Japanese logged out all of the trees during their occupation so there were no windbreaks. All of the hills were bare and all of the flatland was rice paddy, drained or frozen over in the winter. What I experienced was small potatoes compared to what the troops on both sides endured from '50 to '53 in combat. Adios, Larry.

Field Artillery brings dignity to what otherwise might be merely a vulgar brawl.
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Joined: February 15th, 2009, 5:46 am

May 17th, 2012, 10:03 pm #4

his history and I was wondering if others more into armor could fill me in please?

Hi name is Ray Morgan and I think he is close to 80 yrs young.

Jan 1951 Started
May 1951 Shipped to Japan to train
Feb 6th 1952 deployed to Korea
oct 1952 came home and out Dec 7th 1952.

I know nothing of the structre of the USA so this is what he told me:

224 Regiment
40th Division
Charlie Company
4th platoon (a weapons) platoon he said.

He was on a team manning a 57 mm recoiless rifle, he said the rounds weighed 6 pounds each! He carried 6 to 8 on his person.

He said his squad had 6 soldiers. Squad leader, a sgt.,l gunner(corporal),1 loader(corporal),3 ammo bearers(privates)


He started as a bearer and moved to loader when the several members were rotated stateside.

He said the N.Koreans didn't engage them much but when they were relieved by S.Koreans the fighting really increased, then when they roated back in, the N. Koreans didn't engage. He thought it was due to the USA being better trained and the N. Koreans being afraid to engage them too often. I didn't say anything about that since I am a civilian and haven't been in combat.

Ray said the 57 rifle was in short supply and they mainly used a .50 cal machine gun and he said he loved it! There were also a motor crew and he talked about the sound it made and how the infintry on both sides feared the motor attacks. He also talked about flame throwers and was impressed with the weapon.

All in all I had a great time talking with Ray and letting him tell me with obvious pride about his service and how he was glad to return to the USA.

One thing he mentioned frequently was how COLD it was in Korea. When on guard duty the soldier on duty got to wear a parka, they only had enough for the onduty guards to wear, otherwise they wore their field jackets. I think that is why he love living in Texas!

Any more info on the unit and the weapons would be welcomed. Is there a web site for this unit I could share with Ray?

Philip

Philip & Maximilian
Head of Ranch Security, Song Dog, Texas

Where has all the music gone?
http://www.bob-west.com/40thDiv.html

http://www.bob-west.com/224ir-1.html

It looks like the gentleman that runs that site is a C Co. 224th veteran as well.

Here's some info on the M18 57mm Recoilless Rifle - sorta like a bazooka, was introduced late in WWII

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M18_recoilless_rifle

Each rifle company's 4th platoon is the weapons platoon where they have stuff like bazookas and recoilless rifles, mortars, machine guns, etc...





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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 4:23 am

May 17th, 2012, 10:08 pm #5

know and perhaps print some of the material if he doesn't have access to a computer

Philip & Maximilian
Head of Ranch Security, Song Dog, Texas

Where has all the music gone?
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 4:16 am

May 19th, 2012, 12:15 am #6

It might have been calm a few mornings, but the wind almost always blew and came from the north. I served in an artillery battalion in '73 and '74 including two winters. The second winter was the Arab oil embargo and we stayed in the field on reduced operations because we used much less fuel than when in garrison. I spent a lot of time on Artillery Observation Posts and every one faced north to the impact areas. Because of General Howze's dictum that you can't fight out of a closed vehicle, all of our trucks and jeeps had no windshields or cab canvas. I lived in the wool uniform shirt, field pants with liners. long johns, arctic mittens, "mickey-mouse" cold weather boots , pile cap under my steel pot, and a parka with liner with a fur-rimmed hood. Actuaslly the field gear worked very well except on long convoys. It got bitter cold at the guardposts on the actual DMZ at Panmunjon.. The Japanese logged out all of the trees during their occupation so there were no windbreaks. All of the hills were bare and all of the flatland was rice paddy, drained or frozen over in the winter. What I experienced was small potatoes compared to what the troops on both sides endured from '50 to '53 in combat. Adios, Larry.

Field Artillery brings dignity to what otherwise might be merely a vulgar brawl.
what a story he had: Danny had lied about his age to enlist--he was actually fifteen, but the truth wasn't revealed until he had been to Korea--and found himself deep in North Korea in the snow and numbing cold. He became separated from his unit one day (even though the troops were in contact) and was alone. His rifle at the ready, he crept slowly around a large pile of snow and bushes. From around the other side of the mound came a teenage CHICOM "leg", puffy winter coat and all, with an AK-47. Both youngsters were totally surprised, but for some reason neither cried out a warning. It was a real Mexican standoff (kinda funny, since Danny's Hispanic). Danny said that they stared at each other silently in the stillness for what seemed like minutes, then slowly each backed off a foot or two at a time, rifles still leveled. When they were about one hundred feet apart, they each turned and ran back in the direction of their lines. True story; Danny was a November Sierra guy.......

Phil

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Joined: April 4th, 2007, 6:16 am

May 24th, 2012, 1:00 am #7

his history and I was wondering if others more into armor could fill me in please?

Hi name is Ray Morgan and I think he is close to 80 yrs young.

Jan 1951 Started
May 1951 Shipped to Japan to train
Feb 6th 1952 deployed to Korea
oct 1952 came home and out Dec 7th 1952.

I know nothing of the structre of the USA so this is what he told me:

224 Regiment
40th Division
Charlie Company
4th platoon (a weapons) platoon he said.

He was on a team manning a 57 mm recoiless rifle, he said the rounds weighed 6 pounds each! He carried 6 to 8 on his person.

He said his squad had 6 soldiers. Squad leader, a sgt.,l gunner(corporal),1 loader(corporal),3 ammo bearers(privates)


He started as a bearer and moved to loader when the several members were rotated stateside.

He said the N.Koreans didn't engage them much but when they were relieved by S.Koreans the fighting really increased, then when they roated back in, the N. Koreans didn't engage. He thought it was due to the USA being better trained and the N. Koreans being afraid to engage them too often. I didn't say anything about that since I am a civilian and haven't been in combat.

Ray said the 57 rifle was in short supply and they mainly used a .50 cal machine gun and he said he loved it! There were also a motor crew and he talked about the sound it made and how the infintry on both sides feared the motor attacks. He also talked about flame throwers and was impressed with the weapon.

All in all I had a great time talking with Ray and letting him tell me with obvious pride about his service and how he was glad to return to the USA.

One thing he mentioned frequently was how COLD it was in Korea. When on guard duty the soldier on duty got to wear a parka, they only had enough for the onduty guards to wear, otherwise they wore their field jackets. I think that is why he love living in Texas!

Any more info on the unit and the weapons would be welcomed. Is there a web site for this unit I could share with Ray?

Philip

Philip & Maximilian
Head of Ranch Security, Song Dog, Texas

Where has all the music gone?
Regrettably he is senile but before that all he would say "It was the dam---- coldest I've ever been!" and it didn't take much cold to get him feeling real cold for the rest of his life. They let the Marines have a little slack that survived that and after he got back to the states he would start his crane students in his heavy equipment classes by having them turn their cranes around and around in one direction to "tighten them up" so they would not loosen and unscrew and fall off while he had some coffee and woke up.

By the time my father was there things were on the 38th Parallel so it wasn't too bad compared to Chosin. He did tell of having to save his brother's "bacon" a few times when he got back to the states what with him pushing things a bit too hard. A couple of family stories about my Father, my Mother, Korea and me.
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