70th Anniversary of the Battle of Coral Sea

.

70th Anniversary of the Battle of Coral Sea

Joined: December 19th, 2006, 1:51 pm

May 7th, 2012, 12:56 pm #1

Today May 7 and tomorrow May 8 is the 70th Anniversary of the Battle of Coral Sea. It seems to be overlooked, a battle in which the Japanese were turned back from invading Port Moresby and which the carriers Shokaku & Zuikako were damaged and therefore unable to take part in the Midway Operation. A BIG THANK YOU to the veterans on both sides of this battle, let's not forget them and all veterans.

James
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 18th, 2007, 6:05 am

May 7th, 2012, 1:16 pm #2

two fleets engaged and never laid a gun on each other. Only guns fired were AA. Coming 5 months after the Battle off Malaya where Prince of Wales and Repulse went down, Coral Sea was pretty much the last nail in the coffin of "Battleship Supremacy".
As Melville Bell Grosvenor put it: "There is a New Queen of the Sea".
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: February 27th, 2005, 1:47 pm

May 7th, 2012, 1:21 pm #3

Today May 7 and tomorrow May 8 is the 70th Anniversary of the Battle of Coral Sea. It seems to be overlooked, a battle in which the Japanese were turned back from invading Port Moresby and which the carriers Shokaku & Zuikako were damaged and therefore unable to take part in the Midway Operation. A BIG THANK YOU to the veterans on both sides of this battle, let's not forget them and all veterans.

James
What would have happened if the Japanese had won this battle- would it have been "all over" with regard to New Guinea, and then possibly Australia, and then there would have been little way to strike back effectively until of course the bomb.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: February 27th, 2005, 3:54 pm

May 7th, 2012, 1:26 pm #4

Today May 7 and tomorrow May 8 is the 70th Anniversary of the Battle of Coral Sea. It seems to be overlooked, a battle in which the Japanese were turned back from invading Port Moresby and which the carriers Shokaku & Zuikako were damaged and therefore unable to take part in the Midway Operation. A BIG THANK YOU to the veterans on both sides of this battle, let's not forget them and all veterans.

James
Not much is known about the Japanese aircraft of the Coral Sea Battle:
http://japaneseaircraft.multiply.com/ph ... _CORAL_SEA

One of my Pearl Harbor Attack correspondents was from USS TANGIER. He gave me a sample from a Japanese KATE that he acquired from the ship's crew assigned to recover items from a B5N wreckage taken at the middle reef of the Indespensible Reef (near the Louisiades).
http://japaneseaircraft.multiply.com/ph ... #photo=165
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 19th, 2006, 1:51 pm

May 7th, 2012, 1:28 pm #5

What would have happened if the Japanese had won this battle- would it have been "all over" with regard to New Guinea, and then possibly Australia, and then there would have been little way to strike back effectively until of course the bomb.
Had the Japanese won and taken Port Moresby, the lifeline to Australia would have been cut off, and we would not have invaded Guadalcanal on August 7. The war in the Pacific would have been vastly different.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 18th, 2007, 6:05 am

May 7th, 2012, 1:31 pm #6

What would have happened if the Japanese had won this battle- would it have been "all over" with regard to New Guinea, and then possibly Australia, and then there would have been little way to strike back effectively until of course the bomb.
would have allowed the Japanese to consolidate their hold on New Guinea. Examination of Japanese records after the war indicates that they saw New Guines as the Southern bastion for defense of their newly won empire. They weren't looking at invading Australia. Their evaluation of an Australian invasion was much effort for little reward.
But a loss at Coral Sea would have meant that the supply line to Australia would have become either longer (re-route to avoid Japanese Air Bases) or more dangerous (subject to Japanese air attacks on convoys).
Worse, if the Shokaku and Zuikaku had survived with little damage, one or both might have been available for the Midway operation, while Yorktown might not, severly changing the odds at Midway.
A loss at Midway! Man, that's a whole nother' story!
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 19th, 2006, 1:51 pm

May 7th, 2012, 1:32 pm #7

Not much is known about the Japanese aircraft of the Coral Sea Battle:
http://japaneseaircraft.multiply.com/ph ... _CORAL_SEA

One of my Pearl Harbor Attack correspondents was from USS TANGIER. He gave me a sample from a Japanese KATE that he acquired from the ship's crew assigned to recover items from a B5N wreckage taken at the middle reef of the Indespensible Reef (near the Louisiades).
http://japaneseaircraft.multiply.com/ph ... #photo=165
Not much is known about the Japanese Naval aircraft that took part in the Coral Sea battle? Have there ever been any surviving airmen accounts of the battle on the Japanese side? Wouldn't the aircraft and the pilots and crews from Shokaku and Zuikaku be somewhat the same that took part in the Pearl Harbor attack?
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 19th, 2006, 1:51 pm

May 7th, 2012, 1:38 pm #8

would have allowed the Japanese to consolidate their hold on New Guinea. Examination of Japanese records after the war indicates that they saw New Guines as the Southern bastion for defense of their newly won empire. They weren't looking at invading Australia. Their evaluation of an Australian invasion was much effort for little reward.
But a loss at Coral Sea would have meant that the supply line to Australia would have become either longer (re-route to avoid Japanese Air Bases) or more dangerous (subject to Japanese air attacks on convoys).
Worse, if the Shokaku and Zuikaku had survived with little damage, one or both might have been available for the Midway operation, while Yorktown might not, severly changing the odds at Midway.
A loss at Midway! Man, that's a whole nother' story!
If we didn't have the lifeline to Australia had the Japanese won Coral Sea, the war in the Pacific would have been much longer than it was. Until the U.S. got the Essex Class carriers, I don't believe we would have gone on the offesnsive until 1943 at the earliest. Just my opinion.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: July 29th, 2005, 1:15 am

May 7th, 2012, 1:44 pm #9

Not much is known about the Japanese Naval aircraft that took part in the Coral Sea battle? Have there ever been any surviving airmen accounts of the battle on the Japanese side? Wouldn't the aircraft and the pilots and crews from Shokaku and Zuikaku be somewhat the same that took part in the Pearl Harbor attack?
...at Midway? Their stories about Midway and most likely the Coral Sea went to the bottom of the ocean with them. Just a thought.

Glenn
Last edited by 53ryder on May 7th, 2012, 1:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 19th, 2006, 1:51 pm

May 7th, 2012, 1:47 pm #10

Today May 7 and tomorrow May 8 is the 70th Anniversary of the Battle of Coral Sea. It seems to be overlooked, a battle in which the Japanese were turned back from invading Port Moresby and which the carriers Shokaku & Zuikako were damaged and therefore unable to take part in the Midway Operation. A BIG THANK YOU to the veterans on both sides of this battle, let's not forget them and all veterans.

James
Does anyone know what other books on the battle are there?

The ones I know of are:

The First Team: Pacific Naval Air Combat from Pearl Harbor to Midway by John Lundstrom

Blue Skies and Blood by Edwin Hoyt

Black Shoe Carrier Admiral: Frank Jack Fletcher at Coral Sea, Midway, and Guadalcanal by John Lundstrom

Queen of the Flat-Tops: The U.S.S. Lexington and the Coral Sea Battle by Stanley Johnston

The Lexington Goes Down by A.A. Hoehling
Quote
Like
Share