TimInCanada

TimInCanada

CHUCK DV
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Joined: 09 Apr 2003, 21:46

29 Apr 2013, 22:01 #1

                                                                                   Tim Taylor
                                                                        Edmonton, Alberta  Canada.
                                                                          RIP February 22,2013


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Here's a very touching article that a friend of Tim's wrote up that tells just what kind of guy Tim was...
They forwarded this to Kate (@ Cycle One) as she was also a friend of Tim's as well..
Kate forwarded it us as she knew we'd like to add it here.
Thanks for sharing, Kate.. 
 RIP Tim.

Tim (the Toolman) Taylor
1963 – 2013
Tim has always been a large man to me.  It wasn’t that he was overly big, although he did stand at 6’1”, rather, it was more of a large spirit he carried everywhere – a presence.  We all knew him as a knowledgeable and generous man.  Tim was quick to offer a hand, and eager to share his experience and Joy. 

When I dumped my ’74 CB750K, I immediately knew who to call.  My pride was hurt, but even worse was my bike with a shattered ignition to immobilize it.  Tim was there, as he always was.  He just knew what to do.  He helped me get past my adrenalin and damaged ego long enough to find a secure place to park the wreck, and began to immediately offer solutions.  Tim didn’t have a truck to pick up the bike, but he knew where to get one.  Tim always knew where to get one – a truck, a clutch, a coil, an obscure whatchamacallit – whatever was needed.  Most importantly, Tim offered that large spirit that assured me I wasn’t an idiot, that we all make mistakes and I was sure to ride again – soon – with his help.  Sure enough, the invincible Honda wasn’t as bad as I thought, and it was barely a week before Tim had it up and running.  He had most of the parts and what he didn’t have he knew how to get – not just where, but how.  When I went to pick up the mended machine, I was received with a “oh yeah, I fixed the headlight switch while I had it – it just needed a good cleaning” and “your signals were week so I rewired them – I figured I had it all apart anyways”.  All the little “I’ll fix it later” problems were taken care of, without the bill or even the air of you owe me. 

Tim finally got his Harley one day.  He told me he bought it because he always wanted one, but he wasn’t particularly impressed with it.  It was only a matter of time, and not a lot of time, before the Harley was gone and the energy he put into my Honda came back to him as he bought it and rode out of my driveway with the biggest shit eating grin you could ever imagine.

Tim is gone now, but the CB750K is not.  I bought it back after he left, and, in typical Tim fashion, it came back in better shape than when I left it.  Much better shape.  Tim is in better shape than when I left him too.  I know he is riding where he is.  Smiling.  Still working on that chopper.  I don’t think he actually ever really wanted that project to be over.  Tim taught me a lot about giving while he was here, but he also taught me some things that are harder for me to learn.  Things like it’s OK to ask for help.  Tim never had a problem asking questions or drawing on the experience of others.  We could all learn a lot from that.  Today, I ask for your help letting go.  As I’ve heard so many people share their experiences over the past months, I find that just a bit easier to do.  As much as I let go, I will always carry a bit of Tim with me as I ride this trip of life.  It’s impossible not to really. 

Ride on good friend, ride on.
Last edited by CHUCK DV on 18 May 2013, 23:24, edited 4 times in total.
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CHUCK DV
Admin
Joined: 09 Apr 2003, 21:46

18 May 2013, 15:19 #2

                    Here's a very touching article that a friend of Tim's wrote up that tells just what kind of guy Tim was...
They forwarded this to Kate (@ Cycle One) as she was also a friend of Tim's as well..
Kate forwarded it us as she knew we'd like to add it here.
Thanks for sharing, Kate.. 
 RIP Tim.

Tim (the Toolman) Taylor
1963 – 2013
Tim has always been a large man to me.  It wasn’t that he was overly big, although he did stand at 6’1”, rather, it was more of a large spirit he carried everywhere – a presence.  We all knew him as a knowledgeable and generous man.  Tim was quick to offer a hand, and eager to share his experience and Joy. 

When I dumped my ’74 CB750K, I immediately knew who to call.  My pride was hurt, but even worse was my bike with a shattered ignition to immobilize it.  Tim was there, as he always was.  He just knew what to do.  He helped me get past my adrenalin and damaged ego long enough to find a secure place to park the wreck, and began to immediately offer solutions.  Tim didn’t have a truck to pick up the bike, but he knew where to get one.  Tim always knew where to get one – a truck, a clutch, a coil, an obscure whatchamacallit – whatever was needed.  Most importantly, Tim offered that large spirit that assured me I wasn’t an idiot, that we all make mistakes and I was sure to ride again – soon – with his help.  Sure enough, the invincible Honda wasn’t as bad as I thought, and it was barely a week before Tim had it up and running.  He had most of the parts and what he didn’t have he knew how to get – not just where, but how.  When I went to pick up the mended machine, I was received with a “oh yeah, I fixed the headlight switch while I had it – it just needed a good cleaning” and “your signals were week so I rewired them – I figured I had it all apart anyways”.  All the little “I’ll fix it later” problems were taken care of, without the bill or even the air of you owe me. 

Tim finally got his Harley one day.  He told me he bought it because he always wanted one, but he wasn’t particularly impressed with it.  It was only a matter of time, and not a lot of time, before the Harley was gone and the energy he put into my Honda came back to him as he bought it and rode out of my driveway with the biggest shit eating grin you could ever imagine.

Tim is gone now, but the CB750K is not.  I bought it back after he left, and, in typical Tim fashion, it came back in better shape than when I left it.  Much better shape.  Tim is in better shape than when I left him too.  I know he is riding where he is.  Smiling.  Still working on that chopper.  I don’t think he actually ever really wanted that project to be over.  Tim taught me a lot about giving while he was here, but he also taught me some things that are harder for me to learn.  Things like it’s OK to ask for help.  Tim never had a problem asking questions or drawing on the experience of others.  We could all learn a lot from that.  Today, I ask for your help letting go.  As I’ve heard so many people share their experiences over the past months, I find that just a bit easier to do.  As much as I let go, I will always carry a bit of Tim with me as I ride this trip of life.  It’s impossible not to really. 

Ride on good friend, ride on.
Last edited by CHUCK DV on 18 May 2013, 23:22, edited 1 time in total.
Reply