Dunkin's Odds and Ends (Pic Heavy! Updated: 10/12/2017)

beef
Registered User
Joined: 21 Aug 2017, 19:16

24 Aug 2017, 21:04 #61

No problem! I'm going to try it too this weekend (along with finally getting my modular dungeon posted here) so hopefully we can compare notes.
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DungeonsNSnapDragons
Registered User
Joined: 06 Sep 2017, 16:39

06 Sep 2017, 16:43 #62

what is your paint scheme on the roof of your inn? I love it (i love all your work). I have been planning an earth tone castle with a bluish slate roof and that is exactly what I had in mind.
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Dunkin
Registered User
Joined: 05 Mar 2013, 19:19

16 Sep 2017, 01:47 #63

Hey folks! While this latest project was finished, I couldn't post it until they had a chance to play it, which happened last night. So now here's my latest project, the generic Tavern.


Here's an example of the "dryfit" process where I figure out the general layout of the levels. This was a unique build so I had to design the layout by scratch. Always pressed for time, I decided to wing it's design and keep the exterior shape simple. This both saved me time and cost me time in the end as well.

I used the same process Hirst showed in one of his tutorials; using double sided tape on cardboard to mass paint smaller pieces. Below is simply 4 of the 6 boards I set up and painted. I tried to paint everything separately to cut down on detail painting at the end.

RIP favorite paintbrush tho. You served me well, old friend.

I built the house in sections. This is the construction of one of the 2nd floor walls. The windows line up with the rooms on the second floor.

Here's a close up of the final construction of the bottom floor fireplace. The tavern has two fireplaces in total. Later, I added firelogs to each of the fireplaces.


Doh! I forgot about how the chimney connects with the second floor! Fixing this oversight set me back a few days.


In the end, the tavern has 3 floors and 4 sections total to it. Here's a shot of all the sections unstacked. at the point of this picture, I had not put in the interior furniture yet.



I had added black felt padding strips to all the areas where each section connects to. This extra padding helps prevent extra chipping and keeps the levels firmly seated.


This is the backdoor of the exterior. Lots of detail added to the walls of the tavern. The stand-in 28mm figure is Sir Bob, "The Not So Brave" and will be used as a scale reference.



Lastly, I added in the hand painted furniture. To keep this set piece versatile, most of the pieces are not glued in, rather stuck into place with little spots of modeling clay. This allows me to rearrange furniture how I like. Or, if a character decides to tip over a table for cover, I can easily accommodate that. the set is big to accommodate more room for battles. :)

A view of the interior from the front. The bottom floor windows simulate stained glass. The "glass" is thin plastic with highlight marker to color the windows.


This is the pre-furniture layout of the second floor. For some reason, I failed to take a picture of the final version with furniture. Each room is a tavern style bedroom for adventurers who like to sleep in style.

Now for something a not Hirst Arts related. No one likes long winded DMs. To counter this and also add flavor to the game, I pack lore, plot hooks and various information into written material for them to read away from the game table. Some are letters from NPCs or material they find on their fallen enemies, etc. This one above was a "gossip print" or "newspaper" sold by the street vendors highlighting some of the various gossip heard among the "common folk" of the city. The imprint in the wax seal were created by custom made wax stamps created from wood dowels and interesting buttons. Some factions (like the Pathfinder's Society) have their own wax seal. Warning: there might be Pathfinder spoilers below.



Here's the inside pages of the newsletter.



With the terrain and letters having a fun and tactile element in the game, loot started to take a back seat in excitement. To counter this, I borrowed an idea from someone who did this for his group. I designed cards to hand out when the characters encountered loot. Designed in Photoshop (note: the original backgrounds were modified from Pathfinder's wonderful card decks) with various art and images taken from the internet, the front held the image and name of the item while the back had a clever description and sometimes known information about the item. If the item is a magic item, there's a second, almost identical sleeve behind it that held the true nature of the item. If the player characters successfully determined the nature of the magic item, they simply pulled the back sleeve out and can now see more complete information on the magic item. The ornate pattern not only added interesting art, but it was also designed to prevent people seeing through the paper to the hidden information beneath it.



Lastly, the game I'm playing is with a bunch of people I work with. From time to time a new flier might appear near their desks that hint at possible future events. With no explanation, this helps build suspense and expectations for future games and shows that they have an impact on the gameworld, good or bad. Overall, this is also an excuse to exercise my art and creativity skills while trying to keep the game fresh and exciting. :) Hope you enjoy.




As always, feedback, comments and constructive crticism is always welcome. Hope it inspired.
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dwarvenranger
Registered User
Joined: 06 Mar 2010, 12:01

16 Sep 2017, 10:16 #64

Dunkin wrote: Hey folks! While this latest project was finished, I couldn't post it until they had a chance to play it, which happened last night. So now here's my latest project, the generic Tavern.


Here's an example of the "dryfit" process where I figure out the general layout of the levels. This was a unique build so I had to design the layout by scratch. Always pressed for time, I decided to wing it's design and keep the exterior shape simple. This both saved me time and cost me time in the end as well.

I used the same process Hirst showed in one of his tutorials; using double sided tape on cardboard to mass paint smaller pieces. Below is simply 4 of the 6 boards I set up and painted. I tried to paint everything separately to cut down on detail painting at the end.

RIP favorite paintbrush tho. You served me well, old friend.

I built the house in sections. This is the construction of one of the 2nd floor walls. The windows line up with the rooms on the second floor.

Here's a close up of the final construction of the bottom floor fireplace. The tavern has two fireplaces in total. Later, I added firelogs to each of the fireplaces.


Doh! I forgot about how the chimney connects with the second floor! Fixing this oversight set me back a few days.


In the end, the tavern has 3 floors and 4 sections total to it. Here's a shot of all the sections unstacked. at the point of this picture, I had not put in the interior furniture yet.



I had added black felt padding strips to all the areas where each section connects to. This extra padding helps prevent extra chipping and keeps the levels firmly seated.


This is the backdoor of the exterior. Lots of detail added to the walls of the tavern. The stand-in 28mm figure is Sir Bob, "The Not So Brave" and will be used as a scale reference.



Lastly, I added in the hand painted furniture. To keep this set piece versatile, most of the pieces are not glued in, rather stuck into place with little spots of modeling clay. This allows me to rearrange furniture how I like. Or, if a character decides to tip over a table for cover, I can easily accommodate that. the set is big to accommodate more room for battles. :)

A view of the interior from the front. The bottom floor windows simulate stained glass. The "glass" is thin plastic with highlight marker to color the windows.


This is the pre-furniture layout of the second floor. For some reason, I failed to take a picture of the final version with furniture. Each room is a tavern style bedroom for adventurers who like to sleep in style.

Now for something a not Hirst Arts related. No one likes long winded DMs. To counter this and also add flavor to the game, I pack lore, plot hooks and various information into written material for them to read away from the game table. Some are letters from NPCs or material they find on their fallen enemies, etc. This one above was a "gossip print" or "newspaper" sold by the street vendors highlighting some of the various gossip heard among the "common folk" of the city. The imprint in the wax seal were created by custom made wax stamps created from wood dowels and interesting buttons. Some factions (like the Pathfinder's Society) have their own wax seal. Warning: there might be Pathfinder spoilers below.



Here's the inside pages of the newsletter.



With the terrain and letters having a fun and tactile element in the game, loot started to take a back seat in excitement. To counter this, I borrowed an idea from someone who did this for his group. I designed cards to hand out when the characters encountered loot. Designed in Photoshop (note: the original backgrounds were modified from Pathfinder's wonderful card decks) with various art and images taken from the internet, the front held the image and name of the item while the back had a clever description and sometimes known information about the item. If the item is a magic item, there's a second, almost identical sleeve behind it that held the true nature of the item. If the player characters successfully determined the nature of the magic item, they simply pulled the back sleeve out and can now see more complete information on the magic item. The ornate pattern not only added interesting art, but it was also designed to prevent people seeing through the paper to the hidden information beneath it.



Lastly, the game I'm playing is with a bunch of people I work with. From time to time a new flier might appear near their desks that hint at possible future events. With no explanation, this helps build suspense and expectations for future games and shows that they have an impact on the gameworld, good or bad. Overall, this is also an excuse to exercise my art and creativity skills while trying to keep the game fresh and exciting. :) Hope you enjoy.




As always, feedback, comments and constructive crticism is always welcome. Hope it inspired.
Excellent work! I do like the cards idea.
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BurningAngel
Registered User
Joined: 20 Nov 2015, 14:50

19 Sep 2017, 12:37 #65

this is epic! very nice job, well done! 
Mold: 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 54, 57, 64, 65, 75, 85, 201, 205, 221, 281, 320, 325, 701Open to exchange: 320 and 325 
Need: 59, 222, 250, 282
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Marell le Fou
Registered User
Joined: 13 Dec 2016, 22:21

20 Sep 2017, 22:17 #66

Please, guys, don't quote entire post with loads of pictures just to say a line...


Dunkin, this is excelent job. Really.

I love the colour you have obtained for the wood parts. And the cream for the walls is an excellent choice.

About wood part on the walls, the regularity of the beams, the repetitive decorations give a very coherent aspect.

And the basement with different walls (stones) is a choise i have maid too with much satisfaction.

What else to say ? The beam mold is really something soooo usefull.
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Dunkin
Registered User
Joined: 05 Mar 2013, 19:19

20 Sep 2017, 23:21 #67

Thanks Marell. I actually like the expressiveness of your houses much more. I thought I'd bang this project out quickly, so I wanted to keep the exterior simple. In the future, I want to create a few buildings that are much more to your style, full of windows and odder wall shapes. :)
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Marell le Fou
Registered User
Joined: 13 Dec 2016, 22:21

20 Sep 2017, 23:55 #68

For a tavern, i think it's correct to built not that original. It has to be a repetitive style, to illustrate the fact that chambers had to look the same, walls too, etc.

So really, i think your oversight is really good.

But yeah, it's pleasant to let imagination create loads of details on a house. I long to see what you will produce !
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Dunkin
Registered User
Joined: 05 Mar 2013, 19:19

12 Oct 2017, 23:30 #69

Here's another terrain board I created for our dnd / pathfinder game. This was a pit style arena house complete with a balcony for the mob leader to watch over the battles.

Note: For some reason, the images come through smaller than they actually are in Tapatalk. You can check it out my larger Imgur album here:
https://imgur.com/gallery/IQDcv



Created with hirstarts molds, this project was on a rush job to complete before the game and before I had to move to a new house. Because of the move, I had to set up in the kitchen. I have a very patient wife. :) This was the only shot I managed to take of this project's assembly, unfortunately.


The paint style was a little different for this project and a bit of an experiment. I tried a "paint daubing" method on the walls with various watered down browns, blacks and greens to get a dirty effect on the walls. I still don't think I got what I was after, but the floors ended up looking good at least.


The arena pit itself used flooring molds from 4Bot Industries. The mini figs are from one of the other members from work.


The project was a fun challenge and a great reveal for the players. I got it done in 2 weeks, which is fast for a project designed from scratch.


Here's the set expanded out. Even though this project was a little more unique, I still try to go for modularity so it can fit with my other sets in some way. Plus, it makes it easier to transport and store if it's in smaller sections like this.


Given more time, I would have added debris to the flooring and a few more smaller details. However, time was against me on this project.


The arena balconies were also separate and mirrored each other for design flexibility.





Here's the set up without the second level rooms.


Finally, to add some suspense and build-up to game day, I designed these fliers to post near the player's offices as a foretelling of the upcoming event. The players had the option to even bet on the battle.


Naturally, the barbarian in the group was tasked with the arena battle. His character cannot read. I play off of this fact by sending him illegible notes from time to time (a true, legible note is also given to the others to read the note to him). The above note was his application form that also explained the arena rules. He went into the fight not knowing what the rules were nor how much he was getting paid to fight. He returned the note with his "signature" and fingerprint in red. Typical barbarian style.
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fyrissian
Registered User
Joined: 17 Jan 2011, 06:41

13 Oct 2017, 20:24 #70

I love the illegible note for the illiterate character. Such an awesome detail! You are an outstanding GM!
Molds: 40, 50, 52, 56, 60, 61, 65, 70, 71, 72, 75, 77, 85, 100, 164, 200, 201, 203, 220, 240, 250, 260, 281, 282, 290, 701
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