Would you correct your boss’s spelling?

Would you correct your boss’s spelling?

Joined: February 10th, 2009, 9:24 pm

May 7th, 2012, 12:19 am #1

Hello Everyone;

I am involved in a research project that my boss is authoring, I am responsible for the physical data collection. In the abstract and survey participant questionnaire that she wrote and forwarded to me by email today, there are several misspelled words. For example: for the word meaning free of charge, she wrote complementary rather than complimentary. For inpatient, she wrote in-patient. There are no misspells that look like a typo, just the wrong choice of spelling for particular words.

Do you think it would be disrespectful or offensive to correct her? We dont have a friendly relationship, but not unfriendly either. Shes pretty hands-off overall, so I dont know how she would react to being corrected. In the email today, she did not say read it over and let me know what you think. She just said thanks to all for helping get this going. I consider her an extremely articulate and intelligent person, and I respect her greatly. I think she was probably not paying attention entirely while writing.

What troubles me about keeping quiet is that survey participants who will be reading this survey abstract and questionnaire may view us as less than the most dedicated to detail and/or educated.

I am extra uncertain because 6 out of 9 people in my department were terminated this past week (but none of those people reported to her). We are having a severe budget crisis at work. Im super nervous about my future employment. And I dont feel safe just because I wasnt let go. My turn for termination would come in 2.5 months, when my contract would be renewed or not renewed. I have heard (rumor mill) that many of those in my position will be eliminated with contract renewal season coming up.

Thanks for all opinions!!

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cy2
Joined: February 16th, 2006, 6:45 pm

May 7th, 2012, 1:07 am #2

and let her know where they are and the suggested corrections. Or if you're unsure, I'd ask, "Is this the final version, or do you want us to comment on formatting/typo's etc?"

I'm always appreciative of people catching my errors and typos. Especially if something it going to be published for a larger audience.

Good luck with the upcoming contract stuff. I hope they see how valuable you are and renew yours!

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Joined: June 20th, 2006, 2:07 am

May 7th, 2012, 1:12 am #3

Hello Everyone;

I am involved in a research project that my boss is authoring, I am responsible for the physical data collection. In the abstract and survey participant questionnaire that she wrote and forwarded to me by email today, there are several misspelled words. For example: for the word meaning free of charge, she wrote complementary rather than complimentary. For inpatient, she wrote in-patient. There are no misspells that look like a typo, just the wrong choice of spelling for particular words.

Do you think it would be disrespectful or offensive to correct her? We dont have a friendly relationship, but not unfriendly either. Shes pretty hands-off overall, so I dont know how she would react to being corrected. In the email today, she did not say read it over and let me know what you think. She just said thanks to all for helping get this going. I consider her an extremely articulate and intelligent person, and I respect her greatly. I think she was probably not paying attention entirely while writing.

What troubles me about keeping quiet is that survey participants who will be reading this survey abstract and questionnaire may view us as less than the most dedicated to detail and/or educated.

I am extra uncertain because 6 out of 9 people in my department were terminated this past week (but none of those people reported to her). We are having a severe budget crisis at work. Im super nervous about my future employment. And I dont feel safe just because I wasnt let go. My turn for termination would come in 2.5 months, when my contract would be renewed or not renewed. I have heard (rumor mill) that many of those in my position will be eliminated with contract renewal season coming up.

Thanks for all opinions!!

Pink
since it's a document that will be seen by so many people and reflects your section rather than one person, I'd point it out to her in a brief way, assuming they were auto-correct mistakes. That's plausible, right? Or simply call them typos and don't go on about them and never mention them again. That is how i'd like to be corrected

I can understand you being hesitant to mention it but I'd think it's worse to not mention it. You know?


Julie
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Joined: December 27th, 2010, 10:25 pm

May 7th, 2012, 1:45 am #4

Hello Everyone;

I am involved in a research project that my boss is authoring, I am responsible for the physical data collection. In the abstract and survey participant questionnaire that she wrote and forwarded to me by email today, there are several misspelled words. For example: for the word meaning free of charge, she wrote complementary rather than complimentary. For inpatient, she wrote in-patient. There are no misspells that look like a typo, just the wrong choice of spelling for particular words.

Do you think it would be disrespectful or offensive to correct her? We dont have a friendly relationship, but not unfriendly either. Shes pretty hands-off overall, so I dont know how she would react to being corrected. In the email today, she did not say read it over and let me know what you think. She just said thanks to all for helping get this going. I consider her an extremely articulate and intelligent person, and I respect her greatly. I think she was probably not paying attention entirely while writing.

What troubles me about keeping quiet is that survey participants who will be reading this survey abstract and questionnaire may view us as less than the most dedicated to detail and/or educated.

I am extra uncertain because 6 out of 9 people in my department were terminated this past week (but none of those people reported to her). We are having a severe budget crisis at work. Im super nervous about my future employment. And I dont feel safe just because I wasnt let go. My turn for termination would come in 2.5 months, when my contract would be renewed or not renewed. I have heard (rumor mill) that many of those in my position will be eliminated with contract renewal season coming up.

Thanks for all opinions!!

Pink
He uses an editor before he submits the final draft of a paper for publication. He "strongly recommended" that I'd submit my manuscript to an editor before submitting the final copy. I did and I have learned a lot from this experience and will be using an editor on all future projects/papers. I also realized that people like him use resources that the rest of us may not be aware of....that makes them appear more articulate / smarter than they appear... (hee!)

Maybe you could ask an indirect question - "I am curious how this process is done. What are the steps to submitting a final paper??"

Also - I wonder if the publisher has their own editor??






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Joined: February 22nd, 2006, 4:05 am

May 7th, 2012, 2:42 am #5

Hello Everyone;

I am involved in a research project that my boss is authoring, I am responsible for the physical data collection. In the abstract and survey participant questionnaire that she wrote and forwarded to me by email today, there are several misspelled words. For example: for the word meaning free of charge, she wrote complementary rather than complimentary. For inpatient, she wrote in-patient. There are no misspells that look like a typo, just the wrong choice of spelling for particular words.

Do you think it would be disrespectful or offensive to correct her? We dont have a friendly relationship, but not unfriendly either. Shes pretty hands-off overall, so I dont know how she would react to being corrected. In the email today, she did not say read it over and let me know what you think. She just said thanks to all for helping get this going. I consider her an extremely articulate and intelligent person, and I respect her greatly. I think she was probably not paying attention entirely while writing.

What troubles me about keeping quiet is that survey participants who will be reading this survey abstract and questionnaire may view us as less than the most dedicated to detail and/or educated.

I am extra uncertain because 6 out of 9 people in my department were terminated this past week (but none of those people reported to her). We are having a severe budget crisis at work. Im super nervous about my future employment. And I dont feel safe just because I wasnt let go. My turn for termination would come in 2.5 months, when my contract would be renewed or not renewed. I have heard (rumor mill) that many of those in my position will be eliminated with contract renewal season coming up.

Thanks for all opinions!!

Pink
outside of work but at work I correct. It's my job to do so. I correct my boss, my colleagues and even the Councillors that I support. Heck I've had to call managers and directors in other depts. to tell them that their work was not only incorrect but inaccurate...and who doesn't like it could just lay down next to it. If I don't then we all look bad AND most times errors WILL cost my employer tons of money. I work for the city and most of what we do goes to appeals, so every single error can be ripped apart in court.

If you could just correct it and not say anything to her maybe you should do that.

HTH,
Z.
p.s. I had a colleague who once while preparing docs. for an appeal, typed that the date to appeal the particular decision was (and the is is not the correct date) May 1, 2201. The correct date was May 1, 2001. That error cost the city thousands and thousands of dollars but in the end, we all had a good laugh about it. She's legally blind and probably for the first time in her 20+ years of service, made an error.
Last edited by ZakiaZ on May 7th, 2012, 2:47 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 19th, 2007, 7:18 pm

May 7th, 2012, 4:12 am #6

Hello Everyone;

I am involved in a research project that my boss is authoring, I am responsible for the physical data collection. In the abstract and survey participant questionnaire that she wrote and forwarded to me by email today, there are several misspelled words. For example: for the word meaning free of charge, she wrote complementary rather than complimentary. For inpatient, she wrote in-patient. There are no misspells that look like a typo, just the wrong choice of spelling for particular words.

Do you think it would be disrespectful or offensive to correct her? We dont have a friendly relationship, but not unfriendly either. Shes pretty hands-off overall, so I dont know how she would react to being corrected. In the email today, she did not say read it over and let me know what you think. She just said thanks to all for helping get this going. I consider her an extremely articulate and intelligent person, and I respect her greatly. I think she was probably not paying attention entirely while writing.

What troubles me about keeping quiet is that survey participants who will be reading this survey abstract and questionnaire may view us as less than the most dedicated to detail and/or educated.

I am extra uncertain because 6 out of 9 people in my department were terminated this past week (but none of those people reported to her). We are having a severe budget crisis at work. Im super nervous about my future employment. And I dont feel safe just because I wasnt let go. My turn for termination would come in 2.5 months, when my contract would be renewed or not renewed. I have heard (rumor mill) that many of those in my position will be eliminated with contract renewal season coming up.

Thanks for all opinions!!

Pink
you really mistrust her and/or fear she might be punitive.

A large part of my job entails writing & I would want to know if I made a mistake. I'm usually mindful enough to look up what I'm unsure of, but almost everyone makes a mistake from time to time.

I would say a few typos jumped out at you or something like that. I would for sure call them typos under the circumstances. And they may be. I know the difference between their, there, & they're, but at times, when I'm flying, I'll put the wrong one in & catch it later. It actually is a typo - or a brain fart - but to a reader, it would probably look like an error of ignorance, which it's not. In my job, many edits occur & one still misses things. Even in work where 1 or 2 additional people read it. Sigh. So giving her the benefit of the doubt, call them typos.

You are right to be concerned. Typos do jump out at people & they can leave a negative impression. I know they do for me when it's anything business related. I think, "Really?" When it comes to a business, someone should be double or triple checking things.



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Joined: February 20th, 2006, 11:35 pm

May 7th, 2012, 4:24 am #7

Hello Everyone;

I am involved in a research project that my boss is authoring, I am responsible for the physical data collection. In the abstract and survey participant questionnaire that she wrote and forwarded to me by email today, there are several misspelled words. For example: for the word meaning free of charge, she wrote complementary rather than complimentary. For inpatient, she wrote in-patient. There are no misspells that look like a typo, just the wrong choice of spelling for particular words.

Do you think it would be disrespectful or offensive to correct her? We dont have a friendly relationship, but not unfriendly either. Shes pretty hands-off overall, so I dont know how she would react to being corrected. In the email today, she did not say read it over and let me know what you think. She just said thanks to all for helping get this going. I consider her an extremely articulate and intelligent person, and I respect her greatly. I think she was probably not paying attention entirely while writing.

What troubles me about keeping quiet is that survey participants who will be reading this survey abstract and questionnaire may view us as less than the most dedicated to detail and/or educated.

I am extra uncertain because 6 out of 9 people in my department were terminated this past week (but none of those people reported to her). We are having a severe budget crisis at work. Im super nervous about my future employment. And I dont feel safe just because I wasnt let go. My turn for termination would come in 2.5 months, when my contract would be renewed or not renewed. I have heard (rumor mill) that many of those in my position will be eliminated with contract renewal season coming up.

Thanks for all opinions!!

Pink
But editing is a big part of my job, and my boss would expect me to catch and fix things like that in a document she (or anyone else) wrote that was going out to others. Now, if she simply wrote me a private e-mail with typos or spelling errors or word choice errors--something that no one else was going to see--I wouldn't say anything.

(Of course this is all theoretical because my boss is a very intelligent writer who almost never makes mistakes like that, none that come to mind in over 8 years of working for her.)

Anyway, I think Cy put it right: "Hi, boss, sounds good--though I noticed a few typos that you'll probably want to fix before sending out."

Good luck -- I know such things can be tricky, but honestly I'm sure she will feel grateful that you pointed out these things.
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Joined: February 10th, 2009, 9:24 pm

May 7th, 2012, 5:04 am #8

and let her know where they are and the suggested corrections. Or if you're unsure, I'd ask, "Is this the final version, or do you want us to comment on formatting/typo's etc?"

I'm always appreciative of people catching my errors and typos. Especially if something it going to be published for a larger audience.

Good luck with the upcoming contract stuff. I hope they see how valuable you are and renew yours!
I feel like its best to point them out, but I do agree that using the word typos would be a safer way to go.

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Joined: February 10th, 2009, 9:24 pm

May 7th, 2012, 5:05 am #9

since it's a document that will be seen by so many people and reflects your section rather than one person, I'd point it out to her in a brief way, assuming they were auto-correct mistakes. That's plausible, right? Or simply call them typos and don't go on about them and never mention them again. That is how i'd like to be corrected

I can understand you being hesitant to mention it but I'd think it's worse to not mention it. You know?


Julie
because my name is going on this study which is to be published down the road.

Thanks for the input!!

Hope all is going well in your corner of the world. Ive been thinking of you.

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Joined: February 10th, 2009, 9:24 pm

May 7th, 2012, 5:07 am #10

He uses an editor before he submits the final draft of a paper for publication. He "strongly recommended" that I'd submit my manuscript to an editor before submitting the final copy. I did and I have learned a lot from this experience and will be using an editor on all future projects/papers. I also realized that people like him use resources that the rest of us may not be aware of....that makes them appear more articulate / smarter than they appear... (hee!)

Maybe you could ask an indirect question - "I am curious how this process is done. What are the steps to submitting a final paper??"

Also - I wonder if the publisher has their own editor??





of a large newspaper, and he said (this was many years ago) that not catching an error would be grounds for termination for a proofreader.

Talk about pressure!!

I agree. Having someone else read my own work is always beneficial. After a while, youve just looked at your own writing for too long and cant see its flaws.

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