another thought on fire safety (deaths ment.)

another thought on fire safety (deaths ment.)

Joined: August 21st, 2006, 3:29 pm

April 16th, 2012, 4:48 pm #1

Hi, ladies,

KFran has added some great information about fire safety in Lillian's thread below, which I hope we'll all read. I wanted to post a separate thread to draw attention to that (i.e. lest anyone miss it in that thread) and also to bring up another fire safety point which is this -- whenever you sleep somewhere other than your house, visiting family or on vacation or whatever -- always practice sensible fire safety there too. For me this means thinking (and asking hosts, if necessary) about how I would get out in a fire and checking that fire exits (if applicable, e.g. in a hotel) are unlocked. If applicable (e.g. last year we stayed in a big "beach house" but didn't need all the bedrooms), I do restrict DS's (particularly) room choice on the basis of how easy it would/wouldn't be to get out of in a fire.

Years ago, my DH and I moved my stepdaughter into an apartment at college, carting furniture up 3 stories on a wooden staircase. I brightly thought to myself there must be a fire escape, but I didn't ask, or check. It wasn't at my DSD's complex (and I'd say "thank heavens," but that's no help to those who died in the complex where it happened), but an identical complex in the same city, where the fire about which information is linked here happened --http://ncfelonymurder.org/copy/SS_N&R2-15-03.html -- and 5 people died, because the only way out of those (smallish, but 3-story) complexes was, indeed, the wooden staircase. Horrible, horrible. Really, worth thinking about these kinds of issues. It could be any of us.

Best wishes,
Alex
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Joined: October 15th, 2004, 5:32 am

April 16th, 2012, 6:53 pm #2

Also been thinking about fire safety. We live in 2 story crsftsman. Does anyone hsve rec for those portable rope emergency fire stsir thingees? I see all typ
es on amazon.
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Joined: August 21st, 2006, 3:29 pm

April 16th, 2012, 7:25 pm #3

Sarasara,

I'm no help. We did get one for my DSD but I don't remember the type and that was ages and ages ago. I will be interested to see what people say as I want to get one for my brother and his wife, who need one.

Best wishes,
Alex
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Joined: June 25th, 2006, 2:32 am

April 16th, 2012, 7:39 pm #4

Also been thinking about fire safety. We live in 2 story crsftsman. Does anyone hsve rec for those portable rope emergency fire stsir thingees? I see all typ
es on amazon.
After KFran's experience last year (omg), I had DH ask our local fire department about ladders when he went on the school field trip with DD last year. They actually said they don't recommend the ladders because most people/kids don't really know how to use them and they actually see more injuries from the ladders than lives saved by them. Sounds odd to me (and also likely influenced by the type of houses in our community -- not too tall circa 1960s-70s homes, etc), but I guess the key is to PRACTICE using them.

This is what I am considering...much more pricey, but I like the idea: permanantly installed fire ladder. All you need to do is throw it out of the window, it is attached to studs below the window...so you don't need to fiddle with the hooks and positioning etc. It seems like it would only increase property value, too. Our 2nd floor is a straight drop down, but this ladder will bend around complicated roof lines, too. My thought is to put these in the kids' bedrooms and the cheaper portable one in our bedroom.

http://www.pearlprotected.com/homeowners.htm

Let me know what you end up doing...I really got to get to this "to do" list item, as a childhood friend's parents' house just burned to the ground last week and has my paranoia on high alert again (it is sad how complacent we can become until a tragedy -- thankfully her aged folks got out, but lost everything in this house they built and lived in continuously since 1959)...

-M
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Joined: May 3rd, 2005, 4:45 pm

April 16th, 2012, 8:38 pm #5

Hi, ladies,

KFran has added some great information about fire safety in Lillian's thread below, which I hope we'll all read. I wanted to post a separate thread to draw attention to that (i.e. lest anyone miss it in that thread) and also to bring up another fire safety point which is this -- whenever you sleep somewhere other than your house, visiting family or on vacation or whatever -- always practice sensible fire safety there too. For me this means thinking (and asking hosts, if necessary) about how I would get out in a fire and checking that fire exits (if applicable, e.g. in a hotel) are unlocked. If applicable (e.g. last year we stayed in a big "beach house" but didn't need all the bedrooms), I do restrict DS's (particularly) room choice on the basis of how easy it would/wouldn't be to get out of in a fire.

Years ago, my DH and I moved my stepdaughter into an apartment at college, carting furniture up 3 stories on a wooden staircase. I brightly thought to myself there must be a fire escape, but I didn't ask, or check. It wasn't at my DSD's complex (and I'd say "thank heavens," but that's no help to those who died in the complex where it happened), but an identical complex in the same city, where the fire about which information is linked here happened --http://ncfelonymurder.org/copy/SS_N&R2-15-03.html -- and 5 people died, because the only way out of those (smallish, but 3-story) complexes was, indeed, the wooden staircase. Horrible, horrible. Really, worth thinking about these kinds of issues. It could be any of us.

Best wishes,
Alex
When our fire occured,we were all sleeping. It started on our screened in porch and went up the outside of our house to the second floor. It was blazing by the time the smoke detectors went off (LESSON: Install smoke detectors on porches--the heat detecting kind, not smoke detecting)

DS1 was upstairs in his room and DS2 was downstairs in our bed. DH ran upstairs to get DS1 out of his room. DH said DS1's window was open and the fire had already reached the window and had already started the curtain and the wall/ceiling on fire. It was aggressive! (DH later told me the only reason that he went upstairs to get DS1 was so that he 'wouldn't die alone' He didn't think they would make it back downstairs)

In our case the stairs were still clear, so DH and DS made it out safely. But, we did have one of those rinky-dink ladder with cloth steps, and I can't imagine that we would've been able to use it. For us, we wanted to get out as fast as possible and fiddling around with a ladder would simply have been out of the question. I would say if you get one of those ladders, really practice using it. The kind we got said that you could only use it once, so we never tried it out.

One thing that I learned about myself (and DH said the same thing) is that during the whole episode I was not scared at all. I think your instincts kick in and you just go into survival mode. I was able to think clearly and act rationally, and I think any mom would. By the time we got to the neighbor's house, the flames were 30 feet in the air and the house was totally engulfed -- no joke -- it's a 2 minute walk. It happened so fast. But somehow we all managed to remain calm and made sure the kids were ok.

One thing I want to mention is that we had an old victorian farm house, which are very dangerous. Modern homes are built to be safer and don't burn as fast. If I were to live in a two story again, I would consider having a permanent outside ladder built by a carpenter.

Smoke Detectors saved our lives. Also, it is possible to install a sprinkler system, which we are currently looking into for our boys rooms. They are a little expensive, but buy extra piece of mind.
Last edited by KFran on April 16th, 2012, 8:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 16th, 2012, 9:40 pm #6

After KFran's experience last year (omg), I had DH ask our local fire department about ladders when he went on the school field trip with DD last year. They actually said they don't recommend the ladders because most people/kids don't really know how to use them and they actually see more injuries from the ladders than lives saved by them. Sounds odd to me (and also likely influenced by the type of houses in our community -- not too tall circa 1960s-70s homes, etc), but I guess the key is to PRACTICE using them.

This is what I am considering...much more pricey, but I like the idea: permanantly installed fire ladder. All you need to do is throw it out of the window, it is attached to studs below the window...so you don't need to fiddle with the hooks and positioning etc. It seems like it would only increase property value, too. Our 2nd floor is a straight drop down, but this ladder will bend around complicated roof lines, too. My thought is to put these in the kids' bedrooms and the cheaper portable one in our bedroom.

http://www.pearlprotected.com/homeowners.htm

Let me know what you end up doing...I really got to get to this "to do" list item, as a childhood friend's parents' house just burned to the ground last week and has my paranoia on high alert again (it is sad how complacent we can become until a tragedy -- thankfully her aged folks got out, but lost everything in this house they built and lived in continuously since 1959)...

-M
that since most of our bedrooms have windows on 2 different walls, I can't be sure the fire won't be on the wall where we install a permanent ladder. I think I prefer the option of buying a ladder that can be moved to the safest window and maybe practicing. And if there is an injury during a real evacuation, at least it's better than dying the house fire.




Keiki's Makuahine (Keiki's Mom) 51, dh 52
Keiki: b. 2002 after 3 months bedrest
Natural conception following ZIFT/chem. pg

Olivia: b. 1999 d. 1999
28-week preemie, ptl cause unknown
Natural conception after 1 mc

ttc since 1998
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Joined: January 19th, 2007, 7:18 pm

April 16th, 2012, 10:51 pm #7

Hi, ladies,

KFran has added some great information about fire safety in Lillian's thread below, which I hope we'll all read. I wanted to post a separate thread to draw attention to that (i.e. lest anyone miss it in that thread) and also to bring up another fire safety point which is this -- whenever you sleep somewhere other than your house, visiting family or on vacation or whatever -- always practice sensible fire safety there too. For me this means thinking (and asking hosts, if necessary) about how I would get out in a fire and checking that fire exits (if applicable, e.g. in a hotel) are unlocked. If applicable (e.g. last year we stayed in a big "beach house" but didn't need all the bedrooms), I do restrict DS's (particularly) room choice on the basis of how easy it would/wouldn't be to get out of in a fire.

Years ago, my DH and I moved my stepdaughter into an apartment at college, carting furniture up 3 stories on a wooden staircase. I brightly thought to myself there must be a fire escape, but I didn't ask, or check. It wasn't at my DSD's complex (and I'd say "thank heavens," but that's no help to those who died in the complex where it happened), but an identical complex in the same city, where the fire about which information is linked here happened --http://ncfelonymurder.org/copy/SS_N&R2-15-03.html -- and 5 people died, because the only way out of those (smallish, but 3-story) complexes was, indeed, the wooden staircase. Horrible, horrible. Really, worth thinking about these kinds of issues. It could be any of us.

Best wishes,
Alex
(((KFran))) I'm sitting here trying to hold it together after reading about what your dh later told you. Very powerful for me, as it speaks to my worst fear. I'm so very glad you guys are safe. What a terrifying experience, to say the least.

This is a very timely thread for me. Ds #1 was watching Thomas the Train & there is a short extra segment at the end about a fire started in the fire station kitchen by a little boy. I'm not a huge Thomas fan & for a long time we didn't let ds watch it b/c he's so sensitive. I forgot about the darn extra segment & sure enough, he's now obessesed with talking about what we will do if a fire starts [fill in the blank]. His room, his brother's room, the kitchen table, the wall, on & on.

Luckily our house is small & one story but it was built in 1940 so I do worry about the electrical. The kitchen & bathroom were rewired but everywhere else has the original cloth wrapped wires. Ugh.

So this thread has reminded me to be patient & to go over everything with him. We do have smoke alarms in the hall & bedrooms but we should probably add one to the basement. And I need to nag dh to fix ds' windows. They are old double hung windows with ropes & weights inside. The ropes recently broke in both windows so lifting them open is hard & keeping them open without holding them the whole time is impossible. Not very safe!



Last edited by ariadne2 on April 16th, 2012, 10:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 17th, 2012, 2:38 am #8

KFran, what you said about dh going up to stay with ds has been on my mind all evening. I'm so glad you're all ok, and I appreciate all the helpful info about fire safety.




Keiki's Makuahine (Keiki's Mom) 51, dh 52
Keiki: b. 2002 after 3 months bedrest
Natural conception following ZIFT/chem. pg

Olivia: b. 1999 d. 1999
28-week preemie, ptl cause unknown
Natural conception after 1 mc

ttc since 1998
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Joined: May 3rd, 2005, 4:45 pm

April 17th, 2012, 3:20 am #9

I bawled my eyes out when DH told me that, I still tear up thinking about i. He just told me a couple of months ago, so I think it was hard for him too,but it sums up the whole event for us.

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Joined: June 26th, 2006, 5:42 am

April 17th, 2012, 8:56 am #10

I have been wondering how you are doing and hoping that the psychological trauma from your fire would not be too overwhelming. The detail about your dh's thought process makes the horror vivid.

Thank you for sharing more details about your story. You may save more lives among us for doing so! I was also wondering that in addition to making your new home extra secure from fire and training your family is there anyting that you did that you found particularly useful to help everyone work through the trauma? I imagine that it will take a while to regain that sense of security and safety.

Malka

ds born 11.20.09 from single embie
highest fsh 75
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