Myrtle Berries

Myrtle Berries

Jane Tapping
Jane Tapping

November 18th, 2009, 10:16 am #1

Hello,

My Myrtle bush has a good crop of berries this year, soon to be picked, but not today,I'd be blown all the way to Shaftesbury. I hope to use some fresh but would like to dry the rest for later. Being of a economical (or rather a tight fisted,) frame of mind I did think of putting them on a tray and letting them dry overnight in the residual warmth of the wood burner. Would this be too fast, slow or what ever? Also any ideas of use apart from marinades and stews?

Jane
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Joined: December 19th, 2007, 10:46 am

November 18th, 2009, 2:53 pm #2

Hi Jane

I've not dried myrtle berries before, but I do dry rosehips and haws from time to time. I would suggest that if you're drying in an oven, you leave the door open for the water vapour to evaporate. If you are drying on top of the stove or in front of it, you might like to dry for more than one night.

I recently left a tray of damp calendula in front of a very hot raybun overnight and by morning, when I'd expected them to be totally dried, they were only just dry and needed a further few weeks in my hot cupboard to dry properly.

With hips and haws, I normally put them into a paper bag and leave them on a shelf in the cupboard next to the hot water pipes which go through the cupboard. The pipes are not lagged and therefore emit quite a lot of heat when the boiler is on. I usually forget about them for a month or three and then transfer to a glass jar when I remember. They dry beautifully this way and keep for years.

Debs should have some suggestions for use as myrtle is one of her favourite plants. I bought one this spring, but lost it amongst the nettles, so I'm not sure if it has survived the weather or the rabbits.

Sarah
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Jane Tapping
Jane Tapping

November 18th, 2009, 5:28 pm #3

Hello,

My Myrtle bush has a good crop of berries this year, soon to be picked, but not today,I'd be blown all the way to Shaftesbury. I hope to use some fresh but would like to dry the rest for later. Being of a economical (or rather a tight fisted,) frame of mind I did think of putting them on a tray and letting them dry overnight in the residual warmth of the wood burner. Would this be too fast, slow or what ever? Also any ideas of use apart from marinades and stews?

Jane
Hello Sarah

Thanks for the tips will try them. The heat from the stove depends on the temperature outside, it's been a little mild recently so I've not stoked up much but it is a nice warmth, pity to waste it. Any ideas for uses would be great. This is the first time I shall be able to harvest berries although the bush is now several years old. I do use the leaves for cooking from time to time in casseroles and with roasted vegetables. Lovely!

Jane
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Anthony George Lyman-Dixon
Anthony George Lyman-Dixon

November 18th, 2009, 5:47 pm #4

Hello,

My Myrtle bush has a good crop of berries this year, soon to be picked, but not today,I'd be blown all the way to Shaftesbury. I hope to use some fresh but would like to dry the rest for later. Being of a economical (or rather a tight fisted,) frame of mind I did think of putting them on a tray and letting them dry overnight in the residual warmth of the wood burner. Would this be too fast, slow or what ever? Also any ideas of use apart from marinades and stews?

Jane
Why not take the easy way out and pickle them in vodka?

crush them, pickled or fresh, to make a stuffing or crust for game. Also stuff game with the leaves.

Obviously it doesn't apply to members of this group, but those who are not good with cuttings will find the seeds germinate readily
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Jane Tapping
Jane Tapping

November 18th, 2009, 10:09 pm #5

Hello,

My Myrtle bush has a good crop of berries this year, soon to be picked, but not today,I'd be blown all the way to Shaftesbury. I hope to use some fresh but would like to dry the rest for later. Being of a economical (or rather a tight fisted,) frame of mind I did think of putting them on a tray and letting them dry overnight in the residual warmth of the wood burner. Would this be too fast, slow or what ever? Also any ideas of use apart from marinades and stews?

Jane
Hello Anthiny,

Sounds like a good idea, shall try that, thanks

Jane
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Joined: December 18th, 2007, 1:07 pm

November 18th, 2009, 11:35 pm #6

Hello,

My Myrtle bush has a good crop of berries this year, soon to be picked, but not today,I'd be blown all the way to Shaftesbury. I hope to use some fresh but would like to dry the rest for later. Being of a economical (or rather a tight fisted,) frame of mind I did think of putting them on a tray and letting them dry overnight in the residual warmth of the wood burner. Would this be too fast, slow or what ever? Also any ideas of use apart from marinades and stews?

Jane
Spooky! I spent all of yesterday trying to find a supplier of myrtle berries that I could buy, I only have two little tarentina bushes and even though they flower abundantly they never give me any berries, I'm going to get a communis for next year, but it will be a while until it gives me any berries sob! I've been reading lots of stuff about myrtle berries lately and after tincturing the leaves (the scent is wonderful!) I'm dying to try them in cooking.

I'd dry them slowly, Jekka has been raving about cooking with Myrtle lately in her newsletters its currently her herb of the month, which is what made me want to get hold of some berries, I want to try the recipe for Hot Mead from her website http://www.jekkasherbfarm.com/HerbMyrtle.asp
I have some recipes somewhere for using myrtle will hunt them out and post them when I find them for you Jane.

If you have any spare.... Cheeky I know, but that's me Alternatively if anybody knows where I can buy myrtle berries please let me know?

Debs
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Jane Tapping
Jane Tapping

November 19th, 2009, 9:15 am #7

Hello,

My Myrtle bush has a good crop of berries this year, soon to be picked, but not today,I'd be blown all the way to Shaftesbury. I hope to use some fresh but would like to dry the rest for later. Being of a economical (or rather a tight fisted,) frame of mind I did think of putting them on a tray and letting them dry overnight in the residual warmth of the wood burner. Would this be too fast, slow or what ever? Also any ideas of use apart from marinades and stews?

Jane
Hello Debs

Will certainly let you have some, and friend in the village would also like some so we'll compare notes. I think it may be a few days beore they are all ready for picking as some are still quite green. Does that matter? Don't think there is much chance of turning one bush into a business though, rather a long long term thing lol! Oh dear my typing gets worse!

Jane
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Joined: December 18th, 2007, 1:07 pm

November 19th, 2009, 9:44 am #8

Hello,

My Myrtle bush has a good crop of berries this year, soon to be picked, but not today,I'd be blown all the way to Shaftesbury. I hope to use some fresh but would like to dry the rest for later. Being of a economical (or rather a tight fisted,) frame of mind I did think of putting them on a tray and letting them dry overnight in the residual warmth of the wood burner. Would this be too fast, slow or what ever? Also any ideas of use apart from marinades and stews?

Jane
That's super Jane, thank you! I'll email you my address I'm not in a rush for them, so whenever they're ready and dried is fine by me.

I found what looks like a tasty cake recipe earlier that you may like to try:

Myrtle Berry & Olive Oil Cake http://www.prochile.us/flavors/recipes/ ... e-oil-cake

Debs
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Jane Tapping
Jane Tapping

December 11th, 2009, 9:47 am #9

Hello,

My Myrtle bush has a good crop of berries this year, soon to be picked, but not today,I'd be blown all the way to Shaftesbury. I hope to use some fresh but would like to dry the rest for later. Being of a economical (or rather a tight fisted,) frame of mind I did think of putting them on a tray and letting them dry overnight in the residual warmth of the wood burner. Would this be too fast, slow or what ever? Also any ideas of use apart from marinades and stews?

Jane
Hello Debs,

I have managed to pick some berries between the "Showers!". Brought them in, dried them off on a tea towel and then scattered them on an old baking tin. Placed them on a trivet on top of the wood burner. Brilliant, stirred them occassionally. Removed them at night just in case then repeated next day. They seem fine but I must admit that I am glad that I no longer keep fancy rats, the dried berries looked a bit like what I cleared from the bottom of the cage, lol, smelt a lot better though. Still have a good number to pick, frost this morning but I suppose they will be OK. It was interesting to see that the berries nearest the wall had ripend first, extra heat from the wall I suppose. It's south facing, protected from the north and east by next door and a hedge so obviously an ideal spot, just wish that they would ripen a little earlier, bit cold to the fingers when picking.
I shall see if I can get some vodka from the village shop this morning and try the pickling as suggested by Anthony. I have down loaded the cake recipe and will try that on the family when they come for Christmas. Let me have your address and I'll pop some in the post.

Jane
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Joined: December 18th, 2007, 1:07 pm

December 11th, 2009, 2:47 pm #10

Hello,

My Myrtle bush has a good crop of berries this year, soon to be picked, but not today,I'd be blown all the way to Shaftesbury. I hope to use some fresh but would like to dry the rest for later. Being of a economical (or rather a tight fisted,) frame of mind I did think of putting them on a tray and letting them dry overnight in the residual warmth of the wood burner. Would this be too fast, slow or what ever? Also any ideas of use apart from marinades and stews?

Jane
Hi Jane

Thank you! I've emailed my address and look forward to the myrtle berries
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