Mono diets

Mono diets

tim
tim

November 18th, 2010, 3:17 pm #1

Dear all,

I am a student of herbal medicine in the UK (with the IRCH), and am currently learning about mono diets and supplements. Although I have found some useful literature - such as Christopher Vasey's books - members' experiences of and views on mono diets would be invaluable to me. I would also be greatly appreciative of your views on Molkosan as a medical supplement.

I look forward to hearing from you!

Tim.

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Karen lawton
Karen lawton

November 30th, 2010, 5:23 pm #2

Hello

I do not know what you mean by mono diets and have never heard of Molkosan -what exactely is it please

thank you
Karen x
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Anthony Lyman-Dixon
Anthony Lyman-Dixon

December 7th, 2010, 9:55 am #3

Dear all,

I am a student of herbal medicine in the UK (with the IRCH), and am currently learning about mono diets and supplements. Although I have found some useful literature - such as Christopher Vasey's books - members' experiences of and views on mono diets would be invaluable to me. I would also be greatly appreciative of your views on Molkosan as a medical supplement.

I look forward to hearing from you!

Tim.
I don't know what Molkosan is either, but on monodiets, the two which immediately spring to mind are the pea/bean diets which wrought such havoc in the middle ages (today's hippies beware!), and the Pellagra-inducing diet of the pre-war Southern states. This latter is more of a deficiency disease rather than actually caused by the foodstuffs themselves, generally cereal. Obviously all monodiets are unbalanced and can lead to an interesting variety of unpleasant deficiency problems
Cassava is different again in that those who know what they are doing can use it as a staple, but strangers or natives eating the wild forms when the domestic crops have failed can fall foul of its toxic glucosides
Anthony
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Joined: December 18th, 2007, 1:07 pm

December 10th, 2010, 10:03 am #4

Dear all,

I am a student of herbal medicine in the UK (with the IRCH), and am currently learning about mono diets and supplements. Although I have found some useful literature - such as Christopher Vasey's books - members' experiences of and views on mono diets would be invaluable to me. I would also be greatly appreciative of your views on Molkosan as a medical supplement.

I look forward to hearing from you!

Tim.
Another person here with no experience of mono-diets, seems like a strange question to be asking on a forum about herbs, it's more of a nutritional thing I'd have thought, we tend to talk about herbs and their uses not supplements and diets on here. Molkosan appears to be a brand name fora health product to promote good digestion type it into Amazon and see for yourself.

Debs
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Anthony Lyman-Dixon
Anthony Lyman-Dixon

December 17th, 2010, 10:39 am #5

Dear all,

I am a student of herbal medicine in the UK (with the IRCH), and am currently learning about mono diets and supplements. Although I have found some useful literature - such as Christopher Vasey's books - members' experiences of and views on mono diets would be invaluable to me. I would also be greatly appreciative of your views on Molkosan as a medical supplement.

I look forward to hearing from you!

Tim.
Surely the relevance of herbs to monodiets is to alleviate their unpleasant consequences; the one we sell for this purpose is Cochlearia (Scurvy grass) though those most in need of it, wouldnt know a herb if it bit them, hence the tedious five a day advertising campaigns wishfully aimed at getting a bit of Vitamin C in to the pie and fry-up diets of the inner city denizens

There is nothing new about this, think of the Marquis of Saluzzos peasant wife Griselda who, at a time when the aristocracy were dying off like flies, thanks to their all-meat diet (Sunday Times 21 March 2004),

When she came homeward she would often bring
Roots, herbs and grasses to the croft;
These she would shred and seeth for flavouring
Chaucer Canterbury Tales Clerks Tale pt 2

Both Chaucer and Boccacio emphasised her intelligence, but this was more to do with allaying the accusations of proto-feminists that the girl must have been half-witted in allowing her husband to treat her like that rather than implying a scientific training in dietics. Nevertheless, necessity and gut-instinct caused her to adopt a diet which was a life-saver. I have seen a French list suggesting which herbs Griselda may have picked, this includes Parsley, Mallow, nettles and patience
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