Meadowsweet Tea

Meadowsweet Tea

Sabrina
Sabrina

July 29th, 2007, 9:58 pm #1

Hello,

I would like to make meadowsweet tea to assist in reducing a mild inflammatory condition. I have purchased some dried herb in bulk, but I'm not sure what quantity is appropriate per cup of tea or how long it should be steeped. Also, can meadowsweet be blended with other herbs such as chamomile?

This is a lovely forum. Many thanks,
Sabrina
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Sarah Head
Sarah Head

July 30th, 2007, 10:10 am #2

Hi Sabrina

The normal quantity to make a tea from dried herb is 2tsps per large mug of boiling water. That quantity would be fine for a small china teapot or cafatiere and you would get two mug/cupfuls out of it. Remember to leave it to brew for ten minutes before you drink it and strain it before you do. You can also use a cafatiere, which is sometimes easier.

If you have bought the dried herb from a health food store, did you ask when it was harvested? If it is more than 12 months old, it may not have all the active ingredients in it. You can usually tell by smelling it and seeing how much colour there is left in the dry herb. Meadowsweet has a distinctive smell and taste. If there is little smell/flavour left, you might want to double the amount you use. The therapeutic dose is to make a tea three times a day.

There are massive amounts of meadowsweet flowering near water courses or in ditches at the moment in the UK, so you may be able to wildcraft your own herb.

If you have an allergy to aspirin, you should not use meadowsweet, because it contains the precursor for salycylic acid.

You can mix meadowsweet with other herbs although it is quite pleasant on its own, especially if you have an upset stomach. It is a bit like drinking fragrant green water. You could add chamomile to it, if so, I would reduce the amount you use from 2tsp to 1tsp and add 1tsp of the other herb. If you have an inflammatory problem, the most useful herb might well be yarrow, which is also available at the moment.

You could also try soothing the inflamed area with an elderflower oil either warmed or cool. Meadowsweet oil and yarrow oil can also be applied externally.

You might also want to be thinking what could have caused the inflammation - whether it is damage to the joint/area, arthritis or gout. If so, there may be other herbs it would be helpful to take to help your liver. Have you seen a medical herbalist about your problem? You might find that helpful. If you are in the uk, you can find your nearest medical herbalist by searching on the National Institute of Medical Herbalist site.

I realise that I've given you far more information than you asked for, but I hope you find it helpful.

Best wishes

Sarah
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Sabrina
Sabrina

July 30th, 2007, 1:02 pm #3

Sarah,

Thank you very much for your helpful information. I live in Canada, and was entirely unfamiliar with this herb. My understanding is that what is referred to as meadowsweet in North America is usually the Spiraea Alba genus. I think Filipendula ulmaria has been introduced in parts of Canada, but I did not recognize it from any of the pictures I could find.

I purchased my meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria) from a wonderful supplier here in Ontario of organic and wildcrafted herbs, and the dried herb is nicely fragrant. I’m very tolerant of aspirin, but have only had to take it occasionally in the past. I thought that I would try to help the healing process along naturally.

Again, thanks so much for your excellent suggestions!

Sabrina
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Joined: August 2nd, 2012, 10:38 am

August 2nd, 2012, 10:52 am #4

Hello,

I would like to make meadowsweet tea to assist in reducing a mild inflammatory condition. I have purchased some dried herb in bulk, but I'm not sure what quantity is appropriate per cup of tea or how long it should be steeped. Also, can meadowsweet be blended with other herbs such as chamomile?

This is a lovely forum. Many thanks,
Sabrina
I had dental surgery recently, and when asked about meds I was taking, I replied that I only take a cup of meadow sweet tea daily. I mentioned it was a blood thinner, but the doctor was very surprised with how much I bled, during the surgery. I also had trouble getting the wound to clot afterwards. I have no history of this problem. I anticipate going back to using the meadowsweet tea, but perhaps using a little less in my tea ball. I find it not only a very pleasant tea to drink, but it seems to help me keep my tendency to have excess acid in my blood under control nicely.
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Kathy
Kathy

August 25th, 2012, 4:58 pm #5

Hello,

I would like to make meadowsweet tea to assist in reducing a mild inflammatory condition. I have purchased some dried herb in bulk, but I'm not sure what quantity is appropriate per cup of tea or how long it should be steeped. Also, can meadowsweet be blended with other herbs such as chamomile?

This is a lovely forum. Many thanks,
Sabrina
Sarah, I was interested in your comments about yarrow because it reminded me of a recent email conversation with someone about yarrow tincture. She is a qualified herbalist and to my surprise told me that she would not consider making a tincture from yarrow because the chemical constituents are so variable, and sure enough my Potter's Herbal Cyclopaedia does say that the volatile oil is of hightly variable composition, and one of the constituents is thujone. I know thujone is toxic in large amounts and is also found in sage, and so caution is advised when taking this, and the Greek variety is favoured for its lower thujone content, so perhaps this is the problem with yarrow too, but have never before read any cautions relating to yarrow beyond 'excess can cause headaches and vertigo'. I was told taking the tea of dried flowers would not concern her so much, yet I have found yarrow tinctures included in remedies in books by both David Hoffmann and Penelope Ody. I'd welcome comments from anyone especially if they've made their own tincture.



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Joined: December 19th, 2007, 10:46 am

August 27th, 2012, 7:28 pm #6

Hello,

I would like to make meadowsweet tea to assist in reducing a mild inflammatory condition. I have purchased some dried herb in bulk, but I'm not sure what quantity is appropriate per cup of tea or how long it should be steeped. Also, can meadowsweet be blended with other herbs such as chamomile?

This is a lovely forum. Many thanks,
Sabrina
Hi Kathy

If you are interested in the thujone debate, I would suggest you read some of the back issues of Hennriette's Herblist where it has been discussed several times. From dim and distant memory, I think the consensus then was that it depends how bio-available the thujone is and this varies from herb to herb.

I have made yarrow tincture, but I must admit that I don't use it much because I use either the tea or the oil most of the time. I'm also very bad at reading text books which tells me what I should be doing!

Yarrow is one of those herbs I cannot be without (I was picking it today and will dry the flowering stems when I get home.) Everyone has their own favourite method of which part of the herb to use - Jim Macdonald only picks flowers, David Hoffman and I think, Chris Hedley have both said "If you need yarrow and the time of the year is only when leaves are available, pick leaves, if not, pick the whole stems, dry and use leaves and flowers". Which is what I do.

The thing to remember about herbalism is that every herb is different every year depending on weather and soil conditions. Just as every human is different every day every year. There is no one set rule, no matter how qualified or experienced the herbalist, you have to work out what works for you and for your herb.

The rule of thumb with any dried herb - if it smells strong and looks the same colour as when you picked it, then it should be fine no matter how old it is. (within 2-5 years). If it doesn't smell and looks colourless and falls to dust, chuck it.

Don't know if any of that helps.

Best wishes

Sarah
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Robin Mooney
Robin Mooney

October 4th, 2012, 11:15 pm #7

Hello,

I would like to make meadowsweet tea to assist in reducing a mild inflammatory condition. I have purchased some dried herb in bulk, but I'm not sure what quantity is appropriate per cup of tea or how long it should be steeped. Also, can meadowsweet be blended with other herbs such as chamomile?

This is a lovely forum. Many thanks,
Sabrina
I just want to take a moment to thank you for your information--you are clear, concise and informative.
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