Herbal menopause cures lack proof...

Herbal menopause cures lack proof...

Joined: December 18th, 2007, 1:07 pm

January 14th, 2009, 12:59 pm #1


Follow the link below to read the full article, but the author of the BBC news report below quotes from Jenny's latest news item on our site in refernce to the article <strong>Cancer fear over herb used to help relieve hot flushes' Daily Mail Monday November 10th 2008</strong> 
www.herbsociety.org.uk/current-news.htm for those that haven't seen it yet.

There is no convincing evidence that herbal remedies commonly taken to relieve troublesome menopausal symptoms actually work, say experts.

And some 'natural' treatments, like black cohosh, can cause serious harm, says the Drugs and Therapeutics Bulletin (DTB).

But herbalists said a lack of proof did not mean the treatments lacked effect.

Polls suggest 40% of UK women have used complementary and alternative therapies for their menopausal symptoms.

Common remedies include red clover, Dong quai and evening primrose oil.

Others include ginseng, wild yam extract, chaste tree, hops, sage leaf, and kava kava.


<table width="231" align="right" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tr><td width="5"><img height="1" alt="" src="http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/shared/img/o.gif" width="5" border="0"></td><td><img height="13" alt="" src="http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/nol/shared/img ... ote_rb.gif" width="24" border="0"> A lack of evidence does not necessarily mean a lack of effect <img height="13" alt="" src="http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/nol/shared/img ... ote_rb.gif" width="23" border="0">
Jenny Jones of the Herb Society</td></tr></table>
<a href="http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/7824864.stm" target="_new">http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/7824864.stm</a>>
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Joined: December 19th, 2007, 10:46 am

January 14th, 2009, 3:25 pm #2

Ok, I'm going to have a rant at a headline now. Excuse me, but I thought the menapause was a physiological change experienced by women, not a disease to be "cured". Like so many "things" apertaining to women, it has been created, diagnosed and "treated" by men either by shutting women away as total invalids for several years or dosing them with drugs which may, in some cases, cause more problems than they had to start with. (And don't get me started on what dear Dr Maudseley did to women who joined the Spiritualist church in Victorian times and what his medical followers are still doing in the name of research!)

I am currently getting to the stage where if I see another advert with a beaming Jane Fonda or other aging actresses speaking glowing reports about their favourite anti-wrinkle/firming cream "because you're worth it", I may well start throwing large objects at the TV set.

Germaine Greer puts things far more eloquently than I ever could in her book "The Change" (required reading along with Susun Weed's New Menapause Book for all women!). Whether or not you agree with her, her final thoughts are that women should become gardeners and grow their own herbs to treat their symptoms, so she can't be all bad!

Sarah (aka a very, very, grumpy, old woman!)
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Jenny
Jenny

January 14th, 2009, 8:09 pm #3

How I agree with you. I have been talking to women about the menopause for years, trying to reassue them that it is a natural progression and nothing to be alarmed about. But alarmed they are by the media and their doctors. and of course all the stress makes their hot flushes worse.
I understand that at one time eastern countries had no name for the menopause, and suffered none of the 'symptoms' that we do. Perhaps because women have a continuing and valued role in eastern society as they get older and don't see it as an ending of something.!

Jenny

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Joined: December 18th, 2007, 1:07 pm

January 15th, 2009, 7:58 am #4


Hi Sarah & Jenny

For those interested the NHS Choices website has a report on the 'dangers of herbal cures' there conclusion is a lovely sit on the fence but point the finger approach. Makes me angry because they don't mention that conventional medicines treatment can have icky side effects and can be potentially dangerous, all we get are the nefarious 'recent HRT scares' no clarification, but black cohosh gets saddled with 'potential liver failure' makes it easy to see who is actually controlling the NHS in my opinion. www.nhs.uk/news/2009/01January/Pages/Me ... edies.aspx

I didn't intend to make people grumpy with yesterday's post, but I'm glad it got people talking, I agree the menopause, is not a disease, its another part of life, pregnancy has some nasty side effects constipation, mood swings, nausea to name but a few, but that is celebrated and isn't viewed as a disease. So why is the menopause different? It's another part of the process we call life!

I to get annoyed at the "because you're worth it" style adds, inferring if I don't buckle to media pressure and spend a fortune on those products, I'm somehow a lesser person, or "not worth it".  I have recently noted that one company does 'anti-ageing products' one targeted for woman "helps to stop the 7 signs of ageing", but the same thing for men "fights the 5 signs of fatigue"! So women age and men just get fatigued is the message being sent out, and they apparently only have 5 signs, grrrr!

Re Germaine Greer, I wonder if we can coax her to become a Herb Society member lol! My opinion of her has changed over the years, I think with time she has changed in some ways although I haven't really followed her career so don't really no what she's up to, last time I saw her was a few years ago on grumpy old women on the BBC.

I agree with what you said Jenny about the valued role of women in society and them not getting symptoms, in western society we're put out ready for the knackers yard or sold a million products to make us look like mutton dressed as lamb "because we're worth it", I guess post baby producing woman aren't valued beyond being gullible purses in our society!

Debs aka a semi grumpy maturing young lady
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Joined: December 18th, 2007, 1:07 pm

January 16th, 2009, 11:21 am #5


Hi Sarah

This topic came up for discussion at last nights MHG meeting, the ladies shared your opinion that it isn't a disease its just another part of the journay of life, comments were made about it only being targeted as a 'disease' and something to talk about in whispers, since the drug companies started making there pills and potions to 'treat' the problem. There was a lot of anger at the way mature women are depicted and treated by the media as well.

So as a result we've decided to make one of our meeting themes this year be "<em>The Menopause - A Celebration</em>". Things to do to help, hands on herbs that can help you ease some of the day to day things menopausal women face on their journey, as well as swapping stories between those that have reached the next stage of the journey and those just about to embark upon it.  And all because of this thread
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Joined: December 19th, 2007, 10:46 am

January 16th, 2009, 12:15 pm #6

That sounds wonderful, Debs!

I shall look forward to the meeting.

I was thinking along the lines of the media and opportunities on Tuesday and I came to the conclusion that what the new Dr Who really needs is a "wise woman" companion to counteract his extreme youth. Obviously they would have to find something else for her to do besides running very fast for most episodes.

My heroine is Judi Dench. She has never been a glamorous actress, but a truly wonderful one ever since I saw her at Stratford in Twelfth Night with her late husband and A Winter's Tale when I was a teenager. Now she is still someone who commands your complete attention and engagement but epitomises the powerful wise woman she is - no matter what her role!

Sarah
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Jane Tapping
Jane Tapping

January 16th, 2009, 9:06 pm #7



Hello Sarah

How I agree about Judi Dench. Pretty well watch everything I can that she has done. Never could figure out why a man matures while a woman gets old. I have reached the wear purple and a red hat stage and am ageing disgracefully. If people don't like it tough. If they complain I shall tell them I grow herbs and see what they make of that. lol.

Jane
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Joined: January 16th, 2008, 9:11 am

January 17th, 2009, 6:19 pm #8

Follow the link below to read the full article, but the author of the BBC news report below quotes from Jenny's latest news item on our site in refernce to the article <strong>Cancer fear over herb used to help relieve hot flushes' Daily Mail Monday November 10th 2008</strong> 
www.herbsociety.org.uk/current-news.htm for those that haven't seen it yet.

There is no convincing evidence that herbal remedies commonly taken to relieve troublesome menopausal symptoms actually work, say experts.

And some 'natural' treatments, like black cohosh, can cause serious harm, says the Drugs and Therapeutics Bulletin (DTB).

But herbalists said a lack of proof did not mean the treatments lacked effect.

Polls suggest 40% of UK women have used complementary and alternative therapies for their menopausal symptoms.

Common remedies include red clover, Dong quai and evening primrose oil.

Others include ginseng, wild yam extract, chaste tree, hops, sage leaf, and kava kava.


<table width="231" align="right" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tr><td width="5"><img height="1" alt="" src="http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/shared/img/o.gif" width="5" border="0"></td><td><img height="13" alt="" src="http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/nol/shared/img ... ote_rb.gif" width="24" border="0"> A lack of evidence does not necessarily mean a lack of effect <img height="13" alt="" src="http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/nol/shared/img ... ote_rb.gif" width="23" border="0">
Jenny Jones of the Herb Society</td></tr></table>
<a href="http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/7824864.stm" target="_new">http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/7824864.stm</a>>
My friend recently recommended Sage tincture for my "warm moments" and I have only been taking them a few days, call it wishful thinking but it does seem to cool me down a bit.
Before my face used to start prickling, and already that has stopped, and although I get warm real quick still, I don't have the urge to take off my coat and shoes and sweater, i can already stand them a little better and can wait for it to pass.
Can anyone tell me why Sage leaf would help with the menopause, as I am very interested?
Thank oyu, and I too read a similar article on the intenet where it also said herb rememdies were no good, but I really do not want to try HRT, and I really believe Herbs will do the trick.
JaneCH
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Joined: January 18th, 2009, 9:54 am

January 18th, 2009, 10:27 am #9

Hi All

I am growing my own herbs too, Just beginning to go through my best years - it took a few years to reach pubity (pubic hair, breasts, menstration) so naturally will take a few years to get to the other side - and loving it. I will definately try the sage tincture when the flushes arrive.

I know what you mean when the ads say, "because I'm worth it" well guess what, try aloe vera juice, it does the same job, and it's in the garden companies will go broke if women get back to basics. Best way to feel at peace when you make your own.

Back to basics
Robyn
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Jenny
Jenny

January 25th, 2009, 8:08 pm #10

Sage has traditionally been used for hot flushes. Its main action is to regulate secretory cell function . ie it reduces sweating, excess mucus etc. Try putting a sage leaf in your mouth, it imediately dries up.
It also helps regulate hormone levels so eases the way through the menopause.
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