Denton in Bloom

Denton in Bloom

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 18th, 2007, 9:51 am #1

Denton in Bloom had a new category for a yard/patio garden, so I decided to enter for a bit of fun. I had more chance with a yard garden than competing with the larger gardens and another factor was the judging was at the beginning of July and not at the end of August as before.

The judges come from the parks department, I guess. They didn’t know much about herbs. I suppose they are experts in bedding out plants. I told them my garden was a sensory garden. The sound is the gentle splash of the water feature, masses of scent from the many herbs, taste from the wild rocket and culinary herbs and not as much colour maybe as in the Municipal Parks and containers, but there were three bright Salvias smelling of tangerines and peaches, a swathe of Verbena bonariensis and a Geranium. The containers of Pelargoniums had suffered from the monsoon season, but then everyone is in the same boat (literally in some cases, though not round here). I’ve missed out touch, but I did get them to rub some of the plants such as chamomile and lemon verbena to release the essential oils.

It amuses me how “oop North” we have back-to-back gardens and in Lunnon they are courtyard gardens.

It was good therapy for me and I haven’t lost anything by entering.

Audrey


Quote
Like
Share

Jane Tapping
Jane Tapping

July 18th, 2007, 10:14 pm #2

Hello Audrey,

Having just opened my rather untidy garden this last weekend I noticed similar attitudes here. Mostly herbs and some veg and fruit and old fashioned cottage plants so not a vast amount of colour although being a dull day the Evening Primroses did look great and the lavenders smelled wonderful as usual. My main show of colour which really met with most approval, was the self-sown perennial sweetpea clambering over the front fence and mixing with the Old English Lavender, and a good show from the assorted Santolina just next to them. There are two main reactions, a quick trot round, a rather snify and superior 'Goodbye' and off quickly to the more conventional gardens on the new estate over the road. The other reaction is a gentle wander round, pausing here and there, asking questions, remarking on the vast crop of plums, touching and a generally relaxed air. The kids loved it, especially as I sent them off with a fist full if leaves and flowers to sniff on their way. This year there seemed to be more of the casual type than the park bedding type so perhaps we are winning.
Jane from Dorset
Quote
Share

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 19th, 2007, 9:57 am #3

Hi Jane,

You sound like a kindred spirit, but then I suppose all herbie people are kindred spirits.

A friend called round yesterday. We went in the garden and then the phone rang inside (wrong number). When I returned Janet was smelling a Salvia and said it smelled citrussy. I think it is called “Tangerine”. I have another that smells of peaches. It was through The Herb Society that I was introduced to the myriad scents of Salvias and they also flower for ages.

You say your garden is untidy, but that is what cottage gardens look like. It sounds lovely. I have been very ill, but I only needed to cut back a few overhanging plants to make the path passable and have a quick sweep.

My friend spent longer in the garden than the judges and was much more interested.

I bet it happened to you as well. A beautiful, sweet smelling rose has opened which showed no sign last Friday. The Betony has started to flower and the meadow rue has produced a beautiful spray of tiny blue flowers so instead of saying, “You should have seen it last week” I should have said “You should see it next week”.

Enjoy your garden. It sounds wonderful.

Audrey








Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 17th, 2007, 3:17 pm #4

Well, folks, I won. I am thrilled. I wish my mum, who was green-fingured, could see me now. I go on to Tameside in Bloom and the judges come next Tuesday. I think I'll be lucky to win the next round. I must confess I haven't put a lot of effort in. Herbs are fairly good-humoured.

Audrey
Quote
Like
Share

Jane Tapping
Jane Tapping

August 17th, 2007, 5:17 pm #5

Congratulations Audrey! Well done, as to not doing a lot to the garden, with this weather few people have. Your garden sounds great. keep up the "non-Chelsea theme". If you have a little time to spare, log-on to www.trismugmug.com and go to the Fippenny News file (our parish mag) for August and you can see our open gardens. We made £377, not bad on a wettish sort of day. Mine's for scruffy one at the end.
Quote
Share

Jane Tapping
Jane Tapping

August 18th, 2007, 7:51 pm #6

Hello Audrey,

My other half has pointed out that I have made a typo in the smugmug address it should be www.tri.smugmug.com sorry
Jane
Quote
Share

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 23rd, 2007, 3:24 pm #7

Hi Jane,
I tried to send you some pictures of the garden but the transmission failed. David has put two pictures on The Herb Society website. If you go to the Home Page, you will get redirected.

I've cut down the mint today as it was getting a bit rampant.

Jane, I started looking at the pictures of the glorious gardens and didn't get to the end, as I hadn't noticed you said yours was the last one. Glimpses of the rather swish houses gave me a bit of an inferiority complex. I'll go back and have a look.
Audrey
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 23rd, 2007, 3:42 pm #8

Hi Jane,
Was it Garden No 10?

Audrey
Quote
Like
Share

Jane Tapping
Jane Tapping

August 23rd, 2007, 9:57 pm #9


Hello Audrey,

Yes No 10, ours is not a swish house, though there are quite a lot in the village. Must say that whatever the house the neighbours are all pretty friendly. Is that because they think we're just a load of superannuated semi hippies? We ride bikes, sell herbal 'stuff' etc. The garden looks a bit more over-grown now as everything grew like mad in the rain. The potatoes are slightly stricken with something or other, probably blight as they cook to mush if I don't watch them carefully. The slugs ate all the courgette plants, the beans are only just about recovering at last. It has been a very good year for fruit, soft fruit like currants, gooseberries and logan berries although the blackbirds I fed all the winter stripped the red currants in a couple of mornings. Thank goodness for the herbs, they seem immune to all the bugs, fungus, birds etc. I must admit that I do grow them tough, don't believe in pampering or mollycoddling 'children'! The thing I'm particularly thrilled with at the moment is the Elecampane. Gorgeous yellow flowers and the bees etc seem to love it. We do seem to be getting more butterflies in the garden now as it has warmed up a little at last. Hope it carries on for a month or two else we shall be lacking in Vit.D. come winter.
Jane
Quote
Share

Jane Tapping
Jane Tapping

August 24th, 2007, 9:36 am #10

Hello Audrey,

I think I'm going senile! My garden is not 10 but the last 10 pictures on the open garden set. I really must start to take some Wood Betony tea for my aged brain. Have just seen the pictures of your garden, they look great.
See below the link to the first picture.


http://tri.smugmug.com/gallery/3149526#173531229

Jane
Quote
Share