South African ?? Leg Irons

South African ?? Leg Irons

Paul Davies
Paul Davies

July 23rd, 2010, 10:38 am #1

In a Post a while back titled Some Hiatt History was the following statement from Mr. H.H. La TROBE in 1975, managing director of Hiatts

"Leg irons have recently been exported by the firm to African Countries and the specification was that they should be supplied with a cold rivet so that the iron could be put on and riveted out in the field. "



The above leg iron is from South Africa and below is shown on Stan's CD attributed to Sth Africa, but no manufacturers name. The one above looks like a cheaper copy of the other because the chain is welded on and the quality not as good.



Obviously these can be locked with a padlock, but couldn't they also be locked with a Cold Rivet of some sort, ie hollow tipped steel rivet or some kind of alloy. You'd either have to carry 2 padlocks with each leg iron or a pocket full of rivets and some kind of tool.

Has anyone got any thoughts about their origin or cold rivets?

paul davies
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Joined: January 31st, 2006, 7:11 pm

July 23rd, 2010, 2:18 pm #2

The top pair looks like a pair of pipe hangers with a couple of hunks of chain and a dime-store swivel welded on.

I', not sure what is the question about cold rivets. That would just imply a common alloy or steel rivet, applied cold. You could buy them from any industrial supplier, or use a mild steel bolt, piened over. You'd need a hammer and cold chisel to strike them off.

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Paul Davies
Paul Davies

July 23rd, 2010, 10:36 pm #3

In a Post a while back titled Some Hiatt History was the following statement from Mr. H.H. La TROBE in 1975, managing director of Hiatts

"Leg irons have recently been exported by the firm to African Countries and the specification was that they should be supplied with a cold rivet so that the iron could be put on and riveted out in the field. "



The above leg iron is from South Africa and below is shown on Stan's CD attributed to Sth Africa, but no manufacturers name. The one above looks like a cheaper copy of the other because the chain is welded on and the quality not as good.



Obviously these can be locked with a padlock, but couldn't they also be locked with a Cold Rivet of some sort, ie hollow tipped steel rivet or some kind of alloy. You'd either have to carry 2 padlocks with each leg iron or a pocket full of rivets and some kind of tool.

Has anyone got any thoughts about their origin or cold rivets?

paul davies
Thanks Dennis,
I know nothing about rivets, but you have confirmed my thoughts. I suspect they would be similar to those used on the hinge of these.
What I am implying is that these (the second pair) my be the ones made by Hiatt and sent to African countries. A model that does not seem to be recorded anywhere officially. But I am only guessing.
Paul
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Anonymous
Anonymous

July 23rd, 2010, 11:35 pm #4

In a Post a while back titled Some Hiatt History was the following statement from Mr. H.H. La TROBE in 1975, managing director of Hiatts

"Leg irons have recently been exported by the firm to African Countries and the specification was that they should be supplied with a cold rivet so that the iron could be put on and riveted out in the field. "



The above leg iron is from South Africa and below is shown on Stan's CD attributed to Sth Africa, but no manufacturers name. The one above looks like a cheaper copy of the other because the chain is welded on and the quality not as good.



Obviously these can be locked with a padlock, but couldn't they also be locked with a Cold Rivet of some sort, ie hollow tipped steel rivet or some kind of alloy. You'd either have to carry 2 padlocks with each leg iron or a pocket full of rivets and some kind of tool.

Has anyone got any thoughts about their origin or cold rivets?

paul davies
If anyone has the information, I'd appreciate knowing exactly how old shackles were secured with rivets, and how this could be reproduced today.
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Paul D
Paul D

July 24th, 2010, 12:06 am #5

In a Post a while back titled Some Hiatt History was the following statement from Mr. H.H. La TROBE in 1975, managing director of Hiatts

"Leg irons have recently been exported by the firm to African Countries and the specification was that they should be supplied with a cold rivet so that the iron could be put on and riveted out in the field. "



The above leg iron is from South Africa and below is shown on Stan's CD attributed to Sth Africa, but no manufacturers name. The one above looks like a cheaper copy of the other because the chain is welded on and the quality not as good.



Obviously these can be locked with a padlock, but couldn't they also be locked with a Cold Rivet of some sort, ie hollow tipped steel rivet or some kind of alloy. You'd either have to carry 2 padlocks with each leg iron or a pocket full of rivets and some kind of tool.

Has anyone got any thoughts about their origin or cold rivets?

paul davies
I guess rivets have been around as long as the blacksmith. Rivets in leg irons were applied hot out of the blacksmith forge and peined over. Page 24 of Alex Nichols book on handcuffs shows a riveting anvil. it is a disc shaped anvil with different sized holes around the perimeter. It could have been used for making the rivets and applying them.
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Joined: January 31st, 2006, 7:11 pm

July 24th, 2010, 3:36 pm #6

In a Post a while back titled Some Hiatt History was the following statement from Mr. H.H. La TROBE in 1975, managing director of Hiatts

"Leg irons have recently been exported by the firm to African Countries and the specification was that they should be supplied with a cold rivet so that the iron could be put on and riveted out in the field. "



The above leg iron is from South Africa and below is shown on Stan's CD attributed to Sth Africa, but no manufacturers name. The one above looks like a cheaper copy of the other because the chain is welded on and the quality not as good.



Obviously these can be locked with a padlock, but couldn't they also be locked with a Cold Rivet of some sort, ie hollow tipped steel rivet or some kind of alloy. You'd either have to carry 2 padlocks with each leg iron or a pocket full of rivets and some kind of tool.

Has anyone got any thoughts about their origin or cold rivets?

paul davies
The bottom irons could literally be made by anyone with a rod bender, a punch press, and a welder. I could subcontract out the parts and make them in my garage, and I'm just a two-bit schlub. So short of finding documentation, it may be impossible to generate any sort of provenance.

If anyone has the information, I'd appreciate knowing exactly how old shackles were secured with rivets, and how this could be reproduced today.

First, you must understand what a rivet is. It's a short piece of metal rod, often iron, with a head on one end. Look at the pivots on those irons. They are rivets. You either make your own by heading a piece of iron bar (A common blacksmith job) or buy them from the rivet store. The rivet goes through the holes in both pieces, and the other end is bashed to make it mushroom out and no longer fit through the hole. It's called peening or piening, and is what the ball end of a ball pien hammer is for. Machines do a prettier job. A Smith would generally do the rivets hot. You could do them cold on a punch press.

So to attach the irons with rivets, you need a set of irons, two rivets, a ball pien hammer and some sort of an anvil. In the field, I'd probably just use a sledgehammer or a piece of RR rail as an anvil. You stick the rivet through the holes and whack it (Pien the end.) until it won't come out again. To take them off, you cut the head off with a chisel.

Do you want to make one pair, or a thousand? The easiest way to make them would be to have a blacksmith do it. Bend the bars on the horn of the anvil. Flatten the ends as shown in the photo. Punch the holes or drill them on the drill press. Cut the chain and re-weld the cut links through the holes. Voilla. The smith would probably work from a pattern drawn in soapstone on his bench.

To make them by machine, you'd need a tool and die maker to make some rudimentary dies for a punch press, a punch press, a rod bender, and a welder. A modern bender is computer controlled, and will spit out the bent sides automatically. You just find someone who does job-work, send them a picture, and pay for the stuff.

The bent sides would then be placed on a punch press. A medium sized one could do each end in one whack, including punching the holes. The steel would probably be punched cold. Again, you find a job shop, perhaps the same one that bent the bars, pay a one-time die-making charge, and pay for the product. At the end, you might own the dies.

Rivet the two sides together on another press, cut and electro-weld the chain, and you have a pair.

If you want them plated, send them to a plater.

This is literally something you could have manufactured, and distribute from your basement. All you need is credit.
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Howy
Howy

July 24th, 2010, 7:21 pm #7

In a Post a while back titled Some Hiatt History was the following statement from Mr. H.H. La TROBE in 1975, managing director of Hiatts

"Leg irons have recently been exported by the firm to African Countries and the specification was that they should be supplied with a cold rivet so that the iron could be put on and riveted out in the field. "



The above leg iron is from South Africa and below is shown on Stan's CD attributed to Sth Africa, but no manufacturers name. The one above looks like a cheaper copy of the other because the chain is welded on and the quality not as good.



Obviously these can be locked with a padlock, but couldn't they also be locked with a Cold Rivet of some sort, ie hollow tipped steel rivet or some kind of alloy. You'd either have to carry 2 padlocks with each leg iron or a pocket full of rivets and some kind of tool.

Has anyone got any thoughts about their origin or cold rivets?

paul davies
40 years ago, on the farm, I had to replace the cutter teeth on the sickle bar when they or the rivets broke.

I just removed the bar, pounded out the other rivet, placed the new section on the bar, pushed rivets up through the hole from the bottom and placed them on an anvil or other hard metal object.

I had a tool, with a concave end which I placed on the rivets and hit it with a large hammer, the concave end formed the rivets into the desired expanded round shape, the rivets were softer steel.

Doing research on this I found this thread, and a source of rivets & tools.

We got our rivets, from the local Case dealer, as the part number was in the sickle bar parts and maintenance manual.

---------------------------------------------------
Valu-Bilt Tractor Parts has replacement teach, rivets, and tools.
www.valu-bilt.com

Rivets are all 1/4 inch x 5/8, 1/2, 15/16, or 1.25 length It looks like 5/8 is the most common length.

Their web site is not very good, so you might ask for a catalog - at least you will have pictures.

Or maybe call and explain what you are trying to do - 888 828-3276

Here is the tool:

Combination rivet vice (punch and riveter) - I presume this is for 1/4 inch rivets T55-0584 $72.39

However, even better might be "Section Bolts" which according to the catalog "replace oval head rivets". These are used with:

Section Bolt Tool "compact heavy duty tool for inserting section bolts into sickle bars without damage or distortion". T55-0532D 26.69

Best of luck

BTW, the blades on a sickle bar are apparently called "sections". They have a wide assortment of sections, though they are listed by "big tractor" manufacturer. Still, if you ever need section you might be able to send them and old one and they could see if they have a match.
----------------------------------------


BTW I was a young pup them, however I never broke the 1" square ~3 foot long wood drive shaft - think of it as like a safety shear pin for a propeller.

It was designed to break if the bar got bound up and not destroy the cutter.

My father broke three, guess he was mowing too fast.

Howy
Cincy
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Paul D
Paul D

July 25th, 2010, 10:50 am #8

In a Post a while back titled Some Hiatt History was the following statement from Mr. H.H. La TROBE in 1975, managing director of Hiatts

"Leg irons have recently been exported by the firm to African Countries and the specification was that they should be supplied with a cold rivet so that the iron could be put on and riveted out in the field. "



The above leg iron is from South Africa and below is shown on Stan's CD attributed to Sth Africa, but no manufacturers name. The one above looks like a cheaper copy of the other because the chain is welded on and the quality not as good.



Obviously these can be locked with a padlock, but couldn't they also be locked with a Cold Rivet of some sort, ie hollow tipped steel rivet or some kind of alloy. You'd either have to carry 2 padlocks with each leg iron or a pocket full of rivets and some kind of tool.

Has anyone got any thoughts about their origin or cold rivets?

paul davies
Hi Anon,
not sure if you wanted to make a pair or are just interested in how to make rivets. The first pair are still for sale in South Africa for 250 Rand - about $33. That's more than I'd pay for the second pair shown. Anyway, looks like no one has any thoughts on what the Hiatt riveted leg irons were???

And thanks to Howy.
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shawn
shawn

June 11th, 2011, 8:28 pm #9

In a Post a while back titled Some Hiatt History was the following statement from Mr. H.H. La TROBE in 1975, managing director of Hiatts

"Leg irons have recently been exported by the firm to African Countries and the specification was that they should be supplied with a cold rivet so that the iron could be put on and riveted out in the field. "



The above leg iron is from South Africa and below is shown on Stan's CD attributed to Sth Africa, but no manufacturers name. The one above looks like a cheaper copy of the other because the chain is welded on and the quality not as good.



Obviously these can be locked with a padlock, but couldn't they also be locked with a Cold Rivet of some sort, ie hollow tipped steel rivet or some kind of alloy. You'd either have to carry 2 padlocks with each leg iron or a pocket full of rivets and some kind of tool.

Has anyone got any thoughts about their origin or cold rivets?

paul davies
Where can you purchase the South African leg irons for about $33.00 ?
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Paul Davies
Paul Davies

June 11th, 2011, 10:45 pm #10

In a Post a while back titled Some Hiatt History was the following statement from Mr. H.H. La TROBE in 1975, managing director of Hiatts

"Leg irons have recently been exported by the firm to African Countries and the specification was that they should be supplied with a cold rivet so that the iron could be put on and riveted out in the field. "



The above leg iron is from South Africa and below is shown on Stan's CD attributed to Sth Africa, but no manufacturers name. The one above looks like a cheaper copy of the other because the chain is welded on and the quality not as good.



Obviously these can be locked with a padlock, but couldn't they also be locked with a Cold Rivet of some sort, ie hollow tipped steel rivet or some kind of alloy. You'd either have to carry 2 padlocks with each leg iron or a pocket full of rivets and some kind of tool.

Has anyone got any thoughts about their origin or cold rivets?

paul davies
The pair shown at the top were for sale in South Africa with a starting price of approx $33 but no one bid on them.
I'd buy a nicer pair if I could prove that Hiatt made them.
Paul
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