Slovenian handcuffs

Slovenian handcuffs

ginn
ginn

January 1st, 2006, 2:26 am #1

Does anybody have one? How do they open. I mean not only key opening.
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ginn
ginn

January 1st, 2006, 2:37 am #2

Just finished watching the collection. My handcuffs are very similar to french La Massenotte, but there is carving: GKG KUCLAR LJUBLJANA 027.
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ginn
ginn

January 1st, 2006, 2:38 am #3

Does anybody have one? How do they open. I mean not only key opening.
Does it mean Slovenia buys french handcuffs?
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ginn
ginn

January 1st, 2006, 2:39 am #4

Does anybody have one? How do they open. I mean not only key opening.
Yeah! And happy New year and X-mas!
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Joined: March 12th, 2005, 12:51 pm

January 1st, 2006, 12:16 pm #5

Does anybody have one? How do they open. I mean not only key opening.
Is there any photo of them available? I would like to have a look at them.

Josef
Czech Republic
http://cz-pouta.wz.cz
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ginn
ginn

January 1st, 2006, 4:23 pm #6

Does anybody have one? How do they open. I mean not only key opening.
http://www.handcuffs.org/gallery/gallery_i-m.html

La Massenotte, France. 1940's.
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Mark Lyons
Mark Lyons

May 7th, 2017, 5:43 pm #7

Does anybody have one? How do they open. I mean not only key opening.
This blog was well over 10 years ago and I don't believe there has been any current discussions about this cuff.

I came into another pair of these and they are very rare. I listed this one on eBay if anyone is interested.
There are similar to the oval style cuffs from Germany and France but cuffs from Ljubljana, Slovenia are much, much harder to find.

Ljubljana is the largest city and capitol of Slovenia.





http://www.ebay.com/itm/-/332210664149?

If any of you Forum Folks in the U.S. bids and wins, I will offer free shipping. Please mention that you are from the forum and I will revise the bill or send the $ back in a check.

I wish I knew more about these cuffs so please respond if you have anything about them.
Thanks

Mark
O--O
Last edited by lauher on August 5th, 2017, 12:03 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Borut Volk
Borut Volk

June 10th, 2017, 6:55 am #8

Does anybody have one? How do they open. I mean not only key opening.
I have been planning to make a thread on GKG handcuffs for ages, but now it is the time to do it. Since I come from Slovenia it is my duty... It will take me a few days to make photos.

I have seen that you do not have original keys for single locking GKG's- I have some extra pieces and I am willing to send them to the USA free of charge..

Anyone interested can mail me on borut_volk@yahoo.com

See you soon!

Borut
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Borut Volk
Borut Volk

June 11th, 2017, 5:19 pm #9

Does anybody have one? How do they open. I mean not only key opening.
Let's start...

On the bottom pictures you can see the oldest piece from my collection. Their manufacturer is unknown, however they resemble La Massenotte or K&D handcuffs very much. In my opinion they date in the time of the "Kraljevina Jugoslavija (1931-1945)"-Yugoslavian monarchy, a constitutional monarchy led by the serbian royal family. The monarchy stretched over today's Slovenia, Serbia, Bosnia, Montenegro and Macedonia. The royal court and the government had excellent diplomatic and economic relationship with France and they have bought a lot of military equipment from the French, including two submarines for the navy. The handcuffs presented on the pictures could be a part of the shipments from the France, or can be a Yugoslavian reverse engineering product, based on the French cuffs. They have aluminium cheek plates, while the other parts are made of blackened steel. The locking mechanism consists of two three-toothed ratchet pawls, which "sink" into the lock, the same way as in the modern French handcuffs (e.g. Rivolier). The chain consists of only one chain link, attached to the swivels. Left cuff only. I do not have the original keys. I' ve bought this piece on a Serbian auction website and got it smuggled to Slovenia, since the Serbian folks are afraid to send such object via ordinary mail. I have never seen any other similar pair for sale again, or anywhere else (films, old photos...)...










The next handcuff is definitely the successor of the handcuffs presented above. It was widely used by the army and the police in the post WWII communist Yugoslavia, which succeeded the monarchy. The producer is unknown- could be the prison labor. I have seen them in quite a lot of Yugoslavian films. The handcuffs do not differ very much from their predecessor at the first sight- aluminium body, blackened rotating arm and chain, which is actually not a chain, but two swivels connected together. The most important difference is that the locking mechanism has been simplified- it has only one three-toothed ratchet pawl, which is hinged at the top. The interesting fact is that I have never seen this type of handcuffs on the Slovenian auction websites, but they are quite common in Serbia, from where the particular pair was smuggled. The key is an original, and also fits in the cuffs presented above. Left cuff only.











In my opinion aluminium was quite an expensive material and the handcuffs made of it were not that strong and durable, so another model came into production. It is a nickel plated steel copy of their predecessor, with all the advantages and disadvantages. First, I would like to present the advantages. The cuff has nice rounded edges, it can harbor a huge wrist, but also a very small one. The cuff literally embraces the whole wrist's surface and does not apply pressure on two points, like most of the American cuffs do. They quite comfortable to wear and even if overtightened they do less damage to the "customer" in comparison to the vertical type of the handcuffs. As all of the French type handcuffs, these have some disadvantages. Long cheek plates are more prone to the twisting and therefore the rotating arm often starts to rub against the cheek plates and disables the speedcuffing action. In case that the shackle boss rivet gets a little bit loose, the rotating arm often hits the cheek plate instead of engaging the ratchet pawl. If the ratchet pawl engaged only one tooth of the rotating arm (in case the suspect had large wrists), the suspect could open the cuff by force. Since the chain has no swivels, there were also cases when a strong suspect could twist the chain ad break the piece connecting the cuff to the chain. This type of handcuffs is still in active service in Slovenia.










If you put the aluminium and steel handcuff together they are a 100% match. Left and right cuff.





I have traded this pair with a police officer a few weeks ago. Although they look very well preserved, they are not what I've expected to get. Both of the rotating arms get stuck between the cheek plates, so the speedcuffing is impossible. I still wonder how this fact did not bother the cop...

I am a little short on time today so... to be continued...

Borut











Last edited by lauher on August 18th, 2017, 5:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Borut Volk
Borut Volk

June 11th, 2017, 8:58 pm #10

Does anybody have one? How do they open. I mean not only key opening.
Let us continue...



The manufacturer of these cuffs is unknown- it could be the prison labor or factory Aurea Celje, Slovenia. They were used by the Yugoslavian police and the army (MP, border patrols). The time of production is also not precisely known, probably in the period between 1960's and 1970's. Here are two photos from the 1980's from the JNA (Yugoslav people's army).








Most of these handcuffs unlike their two predecessors, were marked with a number. It usually consisted of a Roman numeral followed by three or four Arabic digits, which were stamped on the bow of the left cuff. As you have probably noticed, all of the presented handcuffs are easy to pick or shim.


On the bottom photo you can compare all three models of handcuffs together.




Ljubljana was the capitol of the SR Slovenia (Socialist Republic of Slovenia, a part of Yugoslavia). On 183 Zaloška Street in Ljubljana, there was a workshop which produced medals, badges, buttons, police and military insignia. Unlike most of such enterprises in Yugoslavia, which were owned by the state, this workshop had a private owner. It was owned by Mr. Kuclar and its name was GKG Kuclar- Graverstvo in Kovinska Galanterija Kuclar (engravers and metal products Kuclar). The company was in business form the 1970's to the mid 1990's, when the owner retired and sold everything. At the end of the 1970's the company started to produce handcuffs. As the model, they have taken the most common handcuffs that were used, and made some improvements. On the photo below you can see the model handcuffs and the new product.





To be continued...

Last edited by lauher on August 18th, 2017, 5:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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