Slovenian handcuffs

Borut Volk
Borut Volk

June 12th, 2017, 7:06 pm #11

Does anybody have one? How do they open. I mean not only key opening.


Barrel key, swivels, single chain link, stronger rivets, construction made of three sheets of steel instead of four, thicker cheek plates.







There were some variations of the markings on the handcuffs. The pair on the top photo was used by the Slovenian Milica and army (In Yugoslavia the police was called Milicija, in Slovenia Milica), and later on in Policija, in the independent Republic of Slovenia, which separated from the Yugoslavia in 1991. It is marked with four digits engraved under the keyhole on both cuffs. No producer's signature though... Some pieces are still in the official police use in Slovenia.






The pair on the top was also used in Milica and Policija and it is still in the official police use in very small numbers. It is marked with four engraved digits under the keyholes on both sides. On the opposite side there is a sticker with the company's logo.








I have forgotten to mention that there was a lack in quality control in the shop and the handcuffs were not very precisely made. The pair with the logo sticker has at least two. On the photos above you can see how far the ratchet arm's teeth are far away from the ratchet pawl and you can see how huge gap they make at the top of the cuffs. Shimming with a toothpick is not a challenge... Also the edges on some pieces can be quite sharp.





On the top photo you can see that even the number of the ratchet teeth doesn't match. The rotating arm on the left has an extra tooth.







The pair on the pictures above is marked with engraved GKG logo and a serial number consisting of three digits. I have never seen such markings in Slovenia, but they were quite common in other Yugoslavian republics- especially in Serbia, from where I have got this pair. It is in excellent condition and surprisingly well made- smooth edges, no extra teeth...

Last edited by lauher on August 18th, 2017, 5:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

Borut Volk
Borut Volk

June 12th, 2017, 9:01 pm #12

Does anybody have one? How do they open. I mean not only key opening.
All handcuffs which were presented until this point were single locking. GKG Kuclar has developed also a double locking mechanism. It is very simple, but also very unreliable. On the bottom pictures you can see a double locking GKG...










The double lock was activated by turning the screw by 180 degrees, using the "screwdriver" at the top of the key. During the long time usage of such handcuffs, the double lock screw could get loose and the vibrations caused by the ratchet pawl or other vibrations could make it turn around unwillingly... The handcuffs could get double locked in a most critical moment. According to some sources on the internet the users often used a drop of super glue to fix the problem. These handcuffs were mostly used in the Yugoslavian army.

There was a batch of double locking GKG's, which were made of very cheap and low quality materials. In my opinion they were made just before the disintegration of Yugoslavia. I do not know whether Mr. Kuclar became sloppy or he did it on purpose, because they were used in the Yugoslav army, which was changing from the defender of the people to its enemy. The cuffs were made of some cheap stainless steel, the rivets were made of some sort of soft alloy and were literally falling apart. On the bottom picture you can see an example.





I haven't had any trouble with drilling through the rivets, when I was disassembling one of those cuffs. On the pictures below you can see a GKG's internal organs.





Below: Double lock activated



Below: Double lock inactivated




Since the GKG Kuclar closed its door more than 20 years ago and ceased the production of the handcuffs almost a decade earlier, there is not much left to see, except from their products.

The GKG handcuffs are becoming a rare find, the number of produced units is far lower in comparison to the big handcuff producing companies and they are limited to the countries of the former Yugoslavia. Only Croatia and Slovenia are a part of EU and therefore all shipments from the other "Yugo" countries can be quite a challenge, since all the parcels undergo customs control. People from those countries are often afraid of sending the handcuffs via mail or parcel services, so I was often forced to have the stuff smuggled to Slovenia, which took money and also time.

The keys are also a problem, especially those with the double lock tip. It is usually easier to find a pair of cuffs than a key. I do not know why , but the Yugo army soldiers, who mainly used those handcuffs were very prone to losing those keys (and also handcuffs). At some border posts they did not have any keys, and they used to open the handcuffs with all sorts of objects. In comparison to the Slovenian Milica, the army or the police forces in other republics of Yugoslavia have never used handcuff pouches and they were carrying handcuffs and keys in pockets, behind the belt, in back pack... On the other hand the Milica in Slovenia used completely closed pouches, with a key tied to a thread. It was far more difficult to lose its contents and also the cuffs were protected.

Here is a picture of handcuffs in their pouch.





I should have written this disclaimer at the beginning of a thread:

1) Currently I do not own any extra pair to sell.

2) Currently I posses only one key with a double lock pin, and therefore it is not for sale.

3) I have some extra keys for the single locking models- the one for the four chain links cuff, and the single locking GKG key with triangular head.

4) In case I find anything suitable, I will let you know.

That would be all for tonight...

Borut



Last edited by lauher on August 18th, 2017, 5:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

Vince
Vince

June 13th, 2017, 1:44 am #13

Does anybody have one? How do they open. I mean not only key opening.
I just wanted to say thank you for sharing so much info you have on these handcuffs. It is well written and with great photos. I could only imagine what challenges you have gone through to obtain these items. It is great that you took the time to document what you have learned about these cuffs as there is otherwise so little info out there on them.

Thanks again!
--Vince
Quote
Share

Mark Lyons
Mark Lyons

June 13th, 2017, 3:07 am #14

Does anybody have one? How do they open. I mean not only key opening.
Thank you for the work that went into this.
I have 3 versions of these cuffs and I believe I got 1 or 2 from you over the years.
I will print this page and keep it in my library.

Thanks again,

Mark
O--O
Quote
Share

Joined: January 17th, 2016, 10:08 pm

June 13th, 2017, 1:28 pm #15

Does anybody have one? How do they open. I mean not only key opening.
Your wealth of knowledge on these hard to find cuffs is outstanding! Thank you for taking the time to preserve this, here, for us. I have yet to get a set of these for my collection, but I will add them to the list of cuffs to search for.
-Richard Knip-
Quote
Like
Share

Borut Volk
Borut Volk

June 15th, 2017, 6:25 pm #16

Does anybody have one? How do they open. I mean not only key opening.
Mark, as far I remember you have the following pieces in your collection:




Since I have never sold any handcuffs anywhere outside my country, I can definitely say that none of your three pairs have come through my claws. I have only sent a key for the four chain links handcuffs to @Handboeinfreak. That key could be the only part that came from my collection...


As I have mentioned before I can send you some KEYS for the single locking GKG and their predecessors in case you OWN the handcuffs without an original key.


What I can offer is:

Two pieces for:





Five pieces for:





I also have a GKG graveyard consisting of 6 and 1/2 of double locking handcuffs, mostly from the low quality batch I have mentioned before in my thread. Their condition is very poor, some of them seem to be repaired after the production. Rubbing of the rotating arm against the cheek plates is a common feature of each pair. Since I do not want to sell junk, I have never mentioned them. They were a part of a shipment from Serbia and they have ripped me off with that deal.





If anyone is interested in buying this junk, I can put each pair on display on the forum, and I am willing to send them just for the shipping and manipulation costs.

Borut






Last edited by lauher on August 18th, 2017, 5:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

Joined: January 17th, 2016, 10:08 pm

June 15th, 2017, 8:07 pm #17

Does anybody have one? How do they open. I mean not only key opening.
This may be the only chance to get a pair of these. I would like to get 1 pair for my collection. Please, Send me an email at iambiohazard@yahoo.com and we can work out the shipping and such. Thank you!
-Richard Knip-
Quote
Like
Share

Borut Volk
Borut Volk

June 15th, 2017, 8:39 pm #18

Does anybody have one? How do they open. I mean not only key opening.
The pair with the markings "GKG Kuclar 006" is reserved.
Quote
Share

Borut Volk
Borut Volk

June 15th, 2017, 9:41 pm #19

Does anybody have one? How do they open. I mean not only key opening.
One warning is not enough nowadays, so once again: On the last photo you can see my JUNKYARD...
Quote
Share

Mark Lyons
Mark Lyons

June 15th, 2017, 10:50 pm #20

Does anybody have one? How do they open. I mean not only key opening.
Hi,

I would be interested in the 2 flat keys and 5 triangle round AND a junkyard cuff which has the slot double lock screw.

I will send paypal once you give me a price that you would like for these with shipping.

Thank you so much.


Mark
O--O

Quote
Share


Confirmation of reply: