Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 21st, 2003, 2:45 am #61

The day the corps changed

RIDGELAND: On April 8, 1956, six Marine Corps recruits drowned in a disciplinary march into Ribbon Creek. The aftermath caused an overhaul of basic training.

By William H. Whitten
Special to the Carolina Morning News

Matthew C. McKeon, the Parris Island drill instructor who received national attention when he was court-martialed after six of his recruits drowned during a disciplinary march into Ribbon Creek on April 8, 1956, has died at the age of 79.

Ironically, he died on Veterans Day, Nov. 11.

For days, news of the death of the man whose actions caused an overhaul of Marine Corps basic training - some say the demise of the "Old Corps" - has circulated by word of mouth and e-mail throughout the Marine Corps community.

McKeon's obituary appeared in the Worchester (Mass.) Telegram & Gazette but without reference to the Ribbon Creek tragedy.

After the most publicized court martial in Marine Corps history - even Life magazine sent a sketch artist to the trial - McKeon was acquitted on Aug. 4, 1956, of charges of manslaughter and oppression of troops. He was found guilty of negligent homicide and drinking on duty.

The sentence was a $270 fine, nine months of confinement at hard labor, rank reduced to private and a bad conduct discharge.

The secretary of the Navy later reduced the sentence to three months in the brig, reduction to private with no discharge and no fine.

McKeon went back on active duty, regained his sergeant's stripes in about a year and served another 16 years, retiring in 1972 with time credited for his Navy service during World War II.

But in a real sense it was the Marine Corps which had been on trial. For Gen. Randolph Pate, the only Marine Corps commandant to have been born in the local area (Port Royal, Feb. 11, 1898), the failure of the training system was a larger issue than McKeon.

Pate ordered a separate recruit training command to be established at Parris Island, and in San Diego, Calif., to be commanded by a brigadier general selected by the commandant and answering directly to him.

Each of the recruit training commands was to be staffed with specially trained officers "to supervise and monitor but not to supplant the drill instructors" in the training of recruits.

An inspector general was established at Marine headquarters in Washington, D.C.

What has been described as an "uninterrupted flood of publicity by the press, radio and television" divided the nation into opposing camps - those who condemned McKeon and the perception of cruel, sometimes injurious, recruit training, and those who sympathized with him, not wanting to see the nation's premier military service "go soft."

The story began some minutes after 10 p.m. on Sunday, Apr. 8, 1956, when McKeon - a staff sergeant and drill instructor - marched the 74 men of Platoon 71, "A" Company, 3d Recruit Training Battalion from their barracks to Ribbon Creek.

After the recruits, with their individual equipment, entered the tidal stream under darkness some stepped or slid into water over their heads and panicked.

Later testimony indicated that McKeon knew the area and if the recruits had strictly followed his directions, they might not have drowned.

But because he had been drinking earlier, and he decided the platoon needed an unannounced disciplinary night march and was the DI in charge when the drownings took place, the court placed the blame squarely on McKeon.

"In conducting an unauthorized and unnecessary march by night into an area of hazard ... which resulted in the deaths of six brother Marines, (he) not only broke established regulations but violated the fine traditions of the noncommissioned officers of the United States Marine Corps and betrayed the trust reposed in him by his country, his Corps, his lost comrades and the families of the dead," said the Corps, in ordering a general court martial.

But, with national attention centered on the already historic courtroom building and DI facility at Parris Island (since destroyed by fire), a celebrated New York civilian lawyer, Emile Zola Berman - who later defended Robert Kennedy assassin Sirhan Sirhan - volunteered to defend McKeon without pay.

He mounted a massive public relations campaign on behalf of McKeon.

For three weeks there was testimony, including defense testimony by one of the Corps' most renowned heroes, Lt. Gen. Lewis "Chesty" Puller, and the Marine Corps commandant himself.

There was also testimony that McKeon was graduated from the base's DI school just three months earlier, ranking 14th in a class which began with 90 men and ended up with 55.

Documentary evidence showed that McKeon had also undergone a routine psychiatric screening three months before and had been given the highest possible rating on "motivation," "emotional stability" and "hostility factors," and a better than average rating on "achievement."

The psychiatric unit's conclusion was that McKeon was a "mature, stable appearing Marine."

On Oct. 18, 1956, McKeon - having already served part of his time prior to sentencing - was released from custody and restored to active duty, but with reduced rank.

Over the years at least two books have been written about the Ribbon Creek tragedy and infrequent interviews were done with McKeon, who lived out his life in the Worchester suburb of West Boylston.

John Stevens III, a former Marine and now a Massachusetts judge, authored the most recent book, "Court-Martial at Parris Island: The Ribbon Creek Incident," and was at Parris Island in October signing copies.

McKeon is survived by his wife, five children and eight grandchildren. He remained a member of the Marine Corps League. Burial on Nov. 15 was in St. Joseph's Cemetery, Leicester, Mass.

Reporter Mark Kreuzwieser contributed to this report.

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lcpl Baril
lcpl Baril

December 5th, 2003, 10:29 pm #62

Gunny;
i took sgt. Mckeon's phone # off your message this morning. and bingo he was there and very much alive. he does have cancer and says hes on the way out. it was so great to talk to him after almost 50 years. we talked about 20 minutes about the old days. he started to get tired so i told him semper fi and good bye. you know he was a decorated machine gunner in korea didn't you. again thanks for his #. he still remember me after all these years. he told me i wasn't the biggest guy in the plt. and told me where i was in the grad. picture. quite a memory hun.
thank you sir for your time.
semper fi
Hi,
This is a request to obtian a photo of ssgt mckeon during the time of the Ribbon Creek Incident. Any info would be greatly appreciated.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

December 6th, 2003, 12:12 am #63

see under the article, The Day The corps Changed (or similar)...

and then the link to the original article...
<a http://www.lowcountrynow.com/stories/11 ... eath.shtml

Dick Gaines
Last edited by Dick Gaines on December 6th, 2003, 12:13 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Richard Desmarais
Richard Desmarais

December 7th, 2003, 3:48 am #64

hey gene
thought i drop a line and let you know i just talked to sgt. mckeon this morning. he remembered me and the plt. his wife said he was just diagnosed with throat cancer and she said it is terminal. if you want to call i'm enclosing his phone #. 1-508-835-4351. he lives in mass. thank you and semper fi
will poole
Just to let you know that my wifes uncle Matty passed away on Veterans Day Nov 11, 2003
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

December 20th, 2003, 1:53 pm #65

The following is from

http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/usmchist/parris.txt

"Despite the great care thus used in the selection of men assigned to
train recruits, a tragedy resulting from the grievous errors of judgment of a
junior drill instructor occurred on Parris Island in April 1956. Various
regulations and standing orders of the post were violated at the same time.

The offending DI was Staff Sergeant Matthew C. McKeon, assigned to Platoon 71,
"A" Company, 3d Recruit Training Battalion.<81> On Sunday night, 8 April,
between 2000 and 2045, he marched 74 men of Platoon 71 from their barracks to
Ribbon Creek, one of the tidal streams on Parris Island, and led the men into
the water. Some of them got into depths over their heads, panic ensued, and
six recruits drowned in the resulting confusion.

The ostensible purpose of
the march was to teach the recruits discipline.<82> A court of inquiry was convened the next day by Major General Joseph C.
Burger, Commanding General, Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, to
investigate the circumstances. Evidence presented to the court showed that
Sergeant McKeon had graduated from the Drill Instructors' School in February
1956, ranking 14th in a class of 55 graduates; a total of 90 students had
begun the course in his class.

He had been screened by the Psychiatric
Observation Unit on 3 January 1956 and given the highest possible rating on
"motivation," "emotional stability," and "hostility factors," and a
better-than-average rating on "achievement." The conclusion of the
psychiatric unit was that McKeon was a mature, stable appearing career
Marine."<83> 16



The court was of the opinion, after considering all the evidence brought
before it, that the directives governing the recruit-training program were
correct and adequate.<84> These directives, which went into some detail in
prohibiting oppression of recruits and in forbidding training operations in
the nature of punishment, were repeatedly impressed upon students in the Drill
Instructor's School and upon senior and junior drill instructors.<85> In the
opinion of the court, supervision of the training program was adequate.<86>

The court's findings of fact and its opinions based on these findings placed
the blame for the accident squarely on Sergeant McKeon, who, "in conducting an
unauthorized and unnecessary march by night into an area of hazard...which
resulted in the deaths of six brother Marines, not only broke established
regulations but violated the fine traditions of the noncommissioned officers
of the United States Marine Corps and betrayed the trust reposed in him by his
Country, his Corps, his lost comrades and the families of the dead."<87> It
recommended, among other that the sergeant be tried by general
court-martial.<88> After making certain clarifying and supplementary remarks, General Burger
approved the proceedings, findings, opinions, and recommendations.<89>

When the record of proceedings of the court of inquiry was reviewed by
the Commandant of the Marine Corps, General Randolph McC. Pate, he was of the
opinion that the court's action in the case had not gone as far as it should
have. The degree of guilt attributable to Sergeant McKeon, he believed, was
only part of the question.

The Marine Corps itself was on trial in a moral
sense for the death of the six recruits, in his opinion, and he believed that
a reorganization of training procedures at Parris Island, "insofar as the
supervision thereof is concerned," was necessary.<90> Thus, a separate recruit training command was established at Parris
Island, to be commanded by a brigadier general selected by the Commandant and
reporting directly to him.

In this way, the Commandant could "personally
control and monitor the steps which must be taken to insure more effective
supervision of our recruit training system." A similar recruit training
command was to be established at San Diego. Each of these recruit training
commands was to be staffed with specially selected officers "to supervise and
monitor but not to supplant the drill instructors" in the training of
recruits.

At Headquarters Marine Corps, in Washington, the Commandant
appointed an Inspector General of Recruit Training to assist him in the close
supervision of this new administrative machinery. These extraordinary
measures would remain in effect, he said, until he was convinced that no
reasonable objection could be made to the Marine Corps training program.<91> 17





Thus Sergeant McKeon's ill-fated march set off immediate repercussions
which shook Marine Corps training from top to bottom. Moreover, an
uninterrupted flood of publicity by the press, radio, and television literally
divided the entire country into two opposing camps, those who condemmed McKeon
for what had happened and those who sympathized with him.

It was in this glare of public gaze that McKeon's court-martial began at
Parris Island on 16 July 1956. A noted New York trial counsel, Emile Zola
Berman, undertook the sergeant's defense before the military court. For three
weeks, the battle ebbed and flowed, concerned as much with the propriety of
the rationale and practices of Marine Corps training as with McKeon's
responsibility for the Ribbon Creek affair. Witnesses came forward to defend
Marine training, others came forth to condemn it.

The defense presentation
culminated in the appearance on the stand of retired Lieutenant General Lewis
B. Puller and the Commandant of the Marine Corps himself.

Finally, on 4 August 1956, the court handed down its decision: McKeon
was acquitted of charges of manslaughter and oppression of troops; he was
found guilty of negligent homicide and drinking on duty. The sentence was a
fine of $270, nine months confinement at hard labor as a private and a
bad-conduct discharge from the Marine Corps. Upon review by the Secretary of
the Navy, the sentence was reduced to three months hard labor and reduction to
the rank of private; the discharge was set aside and the fine remitted.

Having already served part of his term prior to sentencing, McKeon was
released from custody on 19 October 1956 and restored to duty commensurate
with his reduced rank. By then, most of the public tumult had died, but there
was little doubt that 8 April 1956 had become an historic date in the history
of Marine Corps training, whether it be at Parris Island or elsewhere. The
drownings at Ribbon Creek had brought the training system of the Corps to
public attention in an exceedingly unfavorable light. The Marine Corps,
normally a strictly voluntary organization, had always derived much of its
strength and prestige from the confidence reposed in it by the general
citizenry of the United States.

If this confidence, which had been seriously
shaken in many sectors of the populace, could not be restored, the general
cause of the Corps would suffer. In the 41 years of its existence as a major
center of Marine training, Parris Island had never faced a more serious
challenge; for now, in addition to its primary mission of training new
Marines, it was of utmost importance to assure the American people, by the
power of example, that the rigors of recruit discipline and work were
sufficiently tempered by humanity and common sense as to prevent the
recurrence of tragedies such as Ribbon Creek.


18



Basically, nothing was wrong with recruit training at Parris Island, but
some changes were instituted in training procedures, customs, and philosophy.
Most of the changes can be traced to the objective of saving for the drill
instructor his over-all authority while eliminating every reason that might
cause him to abuse it.<92> Drill instructors were more carefully selected, and a special school was
established to assure that only the best of them became recruit trainers.


Three instructors were assigned each recruit platoon instead of two, while
extra pay of $30 a month was provided each DI to help compensate him for the
extra hours his job required. All training was closely supervised by a team
of officers to seek ways of improving procedures so as to best provide the
type of Marine recruit graduate desired. Drill instructors were directed to
put a greater premium on example, persuasion, psychology, and leadership in
bringing a platoon of recruits into shape.<93>

A special training unit was set up at Parris Island to take care of
recruits with specific problems. A conditioning platoon, designed to take
care of those overweight, provided special diet and proper exercise to help
its members lose up to 30 pounds within three weeks. A motivation platoon for
the recalcitrants and a proficiency platoon for the slow learners were
established.

A strength platoon provided for those requiring special
exercises to build up flabby muscles, and a hospital platoon took care of
those requiring medical attention. More than three-fourths of the recruits
sent to such special platoons return to their regular platoons to successfully
complete the training program.

The Marine Corps does not give up on a recruit
until he has had thorough physical and psychiatric examinations and has had
repeated interviews and careful study by a board of officers. Most of them
get through boot camp, with the rejection rate about 4-1/2 percent at Parris
Island in 1959.<94> There is general agreement that the basic training at Parris Island is
professionally excellent and that the physical training is the best in the
history of the Recruit Depot.

It may not be like the 'old Corps,' but Parris
Island is turning out Marines mentally and physically ready to maintain, and
even enhance, the reputation of the Marine Corps. In the words of Commandant
David M. Shoup, "The Marines we are turning out at Parris Island today can cut
the mustard with any Marine who ever lived and fought.<95>


ADDENDUM:
From Gunny G's Maverick Marines....



R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952-72
<>
Gunny G's Marines Sites & Forums!
Authors return to Parris Island for book signing
Published "Tuesday
By MICHAEL KERR
Gazette staff writer
Eugene Alvarez and John C. Stevens III try to make it back to Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island at least once a year.

The former Devil Dogs come to see how the legendary base where they became Marines -- and in Alvarez's case made Marines -- has changed.

They come to see old friends and recount stories of the good ol' days aboard the depot.

Last week, however, they came to mix a little business with the pleasure of visiting a place that helped form the men they are now.

Thursday afternoon, Alvarez and Stevens set up shop at the depot's Marine Corps Exchange for a dual book signing of Alvarez's latest work "Images of America: Parris Island," and Stevens' first book, "Court-Martial at Parris Island: The Ribbon Creek Incident."

"I always love to come back and visit Parris Island," said Alvarez, who went through boot camp aboard the depot in 1950 and served as a drill instructor there from 1953 to 1954 and again from 1956 to 1959. "It just changes all the time."

Sitting behind a desk adorned with a flower vase, American flag and stacks of their books, Alvarez and Stevens signed copies of their latest works for anyone who wanted one.

Some of the folks getting signatures were already fans. Others had never heard of the books before they wandered into the store Thursday afternoon.

"I was just always interested in (Parris Island)," said Alvarez, who received a research grant from the Marine Corps to get started with his first book.

"Images of America: Parris Island," his fifth book, is now in its third printing and is going strong, he said.

"It's going over very well," said Alvarez, who lives in Georgia.

The book, filled with photographs chronicling the history and legacy of Parris Island, is a visual trip through time as the depot, and the Corps, expanded and changed.

While Alvarez is a veteran in military nonfiction, Stevens is a newcomer.

"Court-Martial at Parris Island" is his first book and consumed three years of his life, two to research the Ribbon Creek incident and one to write the manuscript.

"When I went through Parris Island, Ribbon Creek had just occurred," said Stevens, now a judge in Massachusetts. "The drill instructors were very sensitive about it. They thought one of their (drill instructors) was railroaded at the time."

Years after he had left the Corps and become a lawyer, Stevens decided to give a doctoral dissertation on the April 8, 1956, incident in which drill instructor Staff Sgt. Matthew McKeon led his platoon on a forced night march through Ribbon Creek to restore sagging discipline.

A strong tidal current in the creek swept through and six men drowned, sparking a national news story and a court-martial for McKeon.

Stevens never gave the dissertation, but the story -- which affected his and every recruit's training from then on and changed Parris Island forever -- stayed with him, eventually becoming a critically acclaimed debut book.

"Marines from all over the country have found me and have written me," Stevens said. "It's gotten an outstanding reception."

The most rewarding aspect of the undertaking was the opportunity to meet and discuss the incident with McKeon himself, Stevens said.

"He has lived with that burden and he always will," Stevens said, adding that he hopes the interview helped McKeon in some small way.

"It enabled him to purge himself of some of the shame," he said. "I found it very rewarding."

Gunnery Sergeants Robert Bergmann and John Spencer both stumbled upon the book signing Thursday afternoon and picked up copies of "Court-Martial at Parris Island."

Bergmann said he had no idea anyone had written a book about Ribbon Creek, but was looking forward to delving into it.

Spencer knew the book was out there, but hadn't had the chance to read it yet.

"I knew about the incident," he said. "I just want to find out more about it."

For Alvarez and Stevens, the trip to Parris Island was both a vacation and a chance to meet some young Marines and see how things are done today.

Like many former Marines who return to the depot, Alvarez said there is a litany of physical changes aboard Parris Island, but that the men and women in uniform are the same as they always have been.

"They're still quality people," Alvarez said. "Older guys like us like to talk about back then, but they do a good job today."

Stevens said he couldn't agree more.

"I'm so impressed with these young Marines," he said. "The greatest thing about this book for me is that it reconnected me with the Marine Corps. That's a priceless heritage."
Copyright 2003 The Beaufort Gazette • May not be republished in any form without the express written permission of the publisher.

http://www.beaufortgazette.com/local_ne ... 8933c.html


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george f donahue usmc 1951-54
george f donahue usmc 1951-54

December 27th, 2003, 4:26 pm #66

Just to let you know that my wifes uncle Matty passed away on Veterans Day Nov 11, 2003
my heavy machine gun was assigned to sgt mckeon's rifle platoon during the last week of the korean war in july 1953. he was an outstanding platoon sgt,and very popular with his men. it turned out that we lived 40 miles away from each other in massachusetts I remember him checking positions even when we were under heavy fire. his presence was an inspiration to all. Our paths never crossed again,but I believe that joe buckley of brookline,mass used to hear from him. I was saddened today(dec 27,03) to find out that he passed on nov 11,o3 .I hope that some member of his family will come across this article . I just wanted them to know what a fine human being and an outstanding Marine mathew C.Mckeon was.

Semper Fi,

george f donahue Dec27,o3

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Bill Kana
Bill Kana

February 15th, 2004, 2:37 pm #67

Authors return to Parris Island for book signing
Published "Tuesday
By MICHAEL KERR
Gazette staff writer
Eugene Alvarez and John C. Stevens III try to make it back to Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island at least once a year.

The former Devil Dogs come to see how the legendary base where they became Marines -- and in Alvarez's case made Marines -- has changed.

They come to see old friends and recount stories of the good ol' days aboard the depot.

Last week, however, they came to mix a little business with the pleasure of visiting a place that helped form the men they are now.

Thursday afternoon, Alvarez and Stevens set up shop at the depot's Marine Corps Exchange for a dual book signing of Alvarez's latest work "Images of America: Parris Island," and Stevens' first book, "Court-Martial at Parris Island: The Ribbon Creek Incident."

"I always love to come back and visit Parris Island," said Alvarez, who went through boot camp aboard the depot in 1950 and served as a drill instructor there from 1953 to 1954 and again from 1956 to 1959. "It just changes all the time."

Sitting behind a desk adorned with a flower vase, American flag and stacks of their books, Alvarez and Stevens signed copies of their latest works for anyone who wanted one.

Some of the folks getting signatures were already fans. Others had never heard of the books before they wandered into the store Thursday afternoon.

"I was just always interested in (Parris Island)," said Alvarez, who received a research grant from the Marine Corps to get started with his first book.

"Images of America: Parris Island," his fifth book, is now in its third printing and is going strong, he said.

"It's going over very well," said Alvarez, who lives in Georgia.

The book, filled with photographs chronicling the history and legacy of Parris Island, is a visual trip through time as the depot, and the Corps, expanded and changed.

While Alvarez is a veteran in military nonfiction, Stevens is a newcomer.

"Court-Martial at Parris Island" is his first book and consumed three years of his life, two to research the Ribbon Creek incident and one to write the manuscript.

"When I went through Parris Island, Ribbon Creek had just occurred," said Stevens, now a judge in Massachusetts. "The drill instructors were very sensitive about it. They thought one of their (drill instructors) was railroaded at the time."

Years after he had left the Corps and become a lawyer, Stevens decided to give a doctoral dissertation on the April 8, 1956, incident in which drill instructor Staff Sgt. Matthew McKeon led his platoon on a forced night march through Ribbon Creek to restore sagging discipline.

A strong tidal current in the creek swept through and six men drowned, sparking a national news story and a court-martial for McKeon.

Stevens never gave the dissertation, but the story -- which affected his and every recruit's training from then on and changed Parris Island forever -- stayed with him, eventually becoming a critically acclaimed debut book.

"Marines from all over the country have found me and have written me," Stevens said. "It's gotten an outstanding reception."

The most rewarding aspect of the undertaking was the opportunity to meet and discuss the incident with McKeon himself, Stevens said.

"He has lived with that burden and he always will," Stevens said, adding that he hopes the interview helped McKeon in some small way.

"It enabled him to purge himself of some of the shame," he said. "I found it very rewarding."

Gunnery Sergeants Robert Bergmann and John Spencer both stumbled upon the book signing Thursday afternoon and picked up copies of "Court-Martial at Parris Island."

Bergmann said he had no idea anyone had written a book about Ribbon Creek, but was looking forward to delving into it.

Spencer knew the book was out there, but hadn't had the chance to read it yet.

"I knew about the incident," he said. "I just want to find out more about it."

For Alvarez and Stevens, the trip to Parris Island was both a vacation and a chance to meet some young Marines and see how things are done today.

Like many former Marines who return to the depot, Alvarez said there is a litany of physical changes aboard Parris Island, but that the men and women in uniform are the same as they always have been.

"They're still quality people," Alvarez said. "Older guys like us like to talk about back then, but they do a good job today."

Stevens said he couldn't agree more.

"I'm so impressed with these young Marines," he said. "The greatest thing about this book for me is that it reconnected me with the Marine Corps. That's a priceless heritage."
Copyright 2003 The Beaufort Gazette • May not be republished in any form without the express written permission of the publisher.

http://www.beaufortgazette.com/local_ne ... 8933c.html

Hi Dick, I will miss church this morning because I can't tare myself away from your website, especially the forum on Matthew McKeon & Ribbon Creek!! I acquired a book a few years back (which I havn't read yet) concerning "The Incident". It is simply titled "RIBBON CREEK", written by William B. McKean, Brig. Gen. USMC (Ret), published in 1958. I have read most of the emails and comments posted, however no one makes reference to this book. Have you read this book, and if so how does it compare to Stevens book, which I will acquire soon now that you have renewed my intrest in this facinating piece of our history. I live in Westfield MA., a few miles from the gravesite. My wife and I will pay our respects soom.

Semper Fi

Bill Kana
Gysgt. USMC (Ret) 64-85
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 18th, 2004, 3:40 pm #68

thanx for posting--good to hear from ya.

No, I have not read general McKean's book--in fact, I had not read the Stevens book until after matt McKeon's death and Stevens having posted to this forum. Even so, I would say that Stevens' book would be hard to beat, judging from my reading of it. It was one of those books that I had intended to buy and read for years, but something I put off until...

Best wishes, and...
Semper Fidelis
Dick Gaines
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will poole
will poole

February 18th, 2004, 4:44 pm #69

Hi Dick, I will miss church this morning because I can't tare myself away from your website, especially the forum on Matthew McKeon & Ribbon Creek!! I acquired a book a few years back (which I havn't read yet) concerning "The Incident". It is simply titled "RIBBON CREEK", written by William B. McKean, Brig. Gen. USMC (Ret), published in 1958. I have read most of the emails and comments posted, however no one makes reference to this book. Have you read this book, and if so how does it compare to Stevens book, which I will acquire soon now that you have renewed my intrest in this facinating piece of our history. I live in Westfield MA., a few miles from the gravesite. My wife and I will pay our respects soom.

Semper Fi

Bill Kana
Gysgt. USMC (Ret) 64-85
hey gy
you probaly seen my name on some e-mails to the gy concerning sgt. M. Mckeon.i read the book by stevens and one other by the legal officer at parris island at the time of the parris island march.If i'm not mistaken his name was Major Faw.Stevens book seemed to center mostly on the aftermath and the court-martiel. The Majors book had a little more leading up to the march its self.At least it seemed that way to me. I never seen the book your referring to. but i did call my library and they did have a copy in their store room. i'll get it in a few days. I turn 65 on the 20th of this month and went to parris island on my 17th birthday.i have no idea how many members of plt. 71 are still living but i was the youngest. So they have to be thinning out some what. Feel free to e-mail me with any questions you might have about the march and i'll answer to the best of my ability. But do remember that was 48 years ago.
Will Poole
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gene ervin
gene ervin

March 27th, 2004, 5:28 am #70

Hey Poole...this is Gene Ervin. I remember you in the platoon. I think we may have exchanged emails a few years ago also. I was the Right Guide.
Jay Stevens came through my town of Santa Cruz California a couple of weeks ago. I met with him and we talked about the incident. I was just surfing through the 'Net and saw your name.
Hope all is well.
Semper Fidelis
Gene
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