Old Salts: Anybody Remember "Blanco"?

Old Salts: Anybody Remember "Blanco"?

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 1st, 2002, 4:59 pm #1

I worked for an old-time Marine SNCO back in '52--he was known to ocassionally send a boot out on a search for non-existent items. One day he instructed me to to find his old "ponyo" up at battalion supply and ask him for some "blanco" that he knew he had stashed away somewhere.

Uh oh!, I figured this was gonna be like another of his errands for a seabag-stretcher, etc.

As it turned out, I returned w/the blanco he wanted--as I recall, it was something like the old cakes/bars of laundry soap, but others (much later)remembered it as being in powder form. It was used back in the "Old Corps," apparently, to apply to 782 gear to render it a uniform, light khaki color for inspections, etc.

Semper Fidelis
Dick Gaines
Last edited by Dick Gaines on October 1st, 2002, 6:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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K.L MC CULLOUGH
K.L MC CULLOUGH

October 2nd, 2002, 11:47 pm #2

I SCRUBED MANY BELTS AND PACKS WITH THIS IN THE SUMMER OF 1940. IF YOU WANTED TO LOOK COOL YOU DID YOUR WEB BELT.BUT YOU CAUGHT HELL IF THE STUFF CAME OFF ON YOUR SHIRT WHILE SWEATING.
GUNG HO
MAC
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 3rd, 2002, 1:12 am #3

did ya rub it on dry?
Or di it need to be used w/water?
And, was it in cake form or powder?

Gung Ho!
Dick
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Les Groshong
Les Groshong

October 3rd, 2002, 2:19 am #4

I SCRUBED MANY BELTS AND PACKS WITH THIS IN THE SUMMER OF 1940. IF YOU WANTED TO LOOK COOL YOU DID YOUR WEB BELT.BUT YOU CAUGHT HELL IF THE STUFF CAME OFF ON YOUR SHIRT WHILE SWEATING.
GUNG HO
MAC
Mac, I know the limitaions of my memory, but on the off chance that the use of Blanco was basically an East Coast practice, I have to ask if your experience with it was there?
I remember the faded belts, but always assumed that, like the khakis, there was not a good easy way of
getting the "salty" look.
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K L MC CULLOUGH
K L MC CULLOUGH

October 4th, 2002, 2:50 am #5

did ya rub it on dry?
Or di it need to be used w/water?
And, was it in cake form or powder?

Gung Ho!
Dick
I THOUGHT IT WAS IN A BAR. I DON'T BELIEVE IT WAS POWDER BUT, IT SEEMS THAT WE DID USE WATER AND SWCRUB BRUSH. THAT HAS BEEN A LONG TIME I JUST REMEMBER IT HAD TO BE PUT ON IN A UNIFORM WAY. WE COULD NOT JUST CAKE IT ON.
GUNG HO
MAC
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K L MC CULLOUGH
K L MC CULLOUGH

October 4th, 2002, 2:55 am #6

Mac, I know the limitaions of my memory, but on the off chance that the use of Blanco was basically an East Coast practice, I have to ask if your experience with it was there?
I remember the faded belts, but always assumed that, like the khakis, there was not a good easy way of
getting the "salty" look.
LES I WAS A WEST COAST MARINE. I DID THE BLANCO AT MCRD
ALSO AT CAMP ELLIOT 1940. AND WE DID EVERY THING THAT WAS LEGAL TO TRY NOT TO LOOK LIKE A BOOT.
GUNG HO
MAC
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 5th, 2002, 1:20 am #7

I worked for an old-time Marine SNCO back in '52--he was known to ocassionally send a boot out on a search for non-existent items. One day he instructed me to to find his old "ponyo" up at battalion supply and ask him for some "blanco" that he knew he had stashed away somewhere.

Uh oh!, I figured this was gonna be like another of his errands for a seabag-stretcher, etc.

As it turned out, I returned w/the blanco he wanted--as I recall, it was something like the old cakes/bars of laundry soap, but others (much later)remembered it as being in powder form. It was used back in the "Old Corps," apparently, to apply to 782 gear to render it a uniform, light khaki color for inspections, etc.

Semper Fidelis
Dick Gaines
<A target=_new href="http://disc.server.com/discussion.cgi?i ... le=2166</A>


<A target=_new href="http://disc.server.com/discussion.cgi?i ... le=2166</A>

My Marine Corps career began in June 1941. We used blanco on leggins. Since we were at MCRD San
Diego we thought the use of blanco was idiotic and probably to make life a little harder. I don't think we used it in boot camp, but probably in G-2-8. Not sure if we used it in Samoa. We too left states on January 6, 1942

Last edited by Dick Gaines on October 5th, 2002, 1:27 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 5th, 2002, 3:36 pm #8

I worked for an old-time Marine SNCO back in '52--he was known to ocassionally send a boot out on a search for non-existent items. One day he instructed me to to find his old "ponyo" up at battalion supply and ask him for some "blanco" that he knew he had stashed away somewhere.

Uh oh!, I figured this was gonna be like another of his errands for a seabag-stretcher, etc.

As it turned out, I returned w/the blanco he wanted--as I recall, it was something like the old cakes/bars of laundry soap, but others (much later)remembered it as being in powder form. It was used back in the "Old Corps," apparently, to apply to 782 gear to render it a uniform, light khaki color for inspections, etc.

Semper Fidelis
Dick Gaines
Date: Sat, 05 Oct 2002 16:31:19 +0100
From: "Richard Smith" <r.c.smith@blueyonder.co.uk> | This is Spam | Add to Address Book
To: "Ukans WW1 list" <wwi-l@raven.cc.ku.edu>
Subject: Re: Re Blanco

on 5/10/02 2:55 pm, R.W.GAINES wrote: > I am still attempting to locate an > article/reference information on Blanco. It was > used by the USMC up to the early days of WW II. > Apparently, it came in either cake or powder > form, and was applied to 782/web gear to render a > clean, uniform khaki color.

'Blanco', as the name suggests,was originally a whitener like pipeclay. I used it on my cricket boots as late as the 60s. My father spoke often, and with passion, about the practice of blancoing webbing...
Regards Dick Smith r.c.smith@blueyonder.co.uk r.smith@free.fr www.aulton.demon.co.uk
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 5th, 2002, 5:39 pm #9

I worked for an old-time Marine SNCO back in '52--he was known to ocassionally send a boot out on a search for non-existent items. One day he instructed me to to find his old "ponyo" up at battalion supply and ask him for some "blanco" that he knew he had stashed away somewhere.

Uh oh!, I figured this was gonna be like another of his errands for a seabag-stretcher, etc.

As it turned out, I returned w/the blanco he wanted--as I recall, it was something like the old cakes/bars of laundry soap, but others (much later)remembered it as being in powder form. It was used back in the "Old Corps," apparently, to apply to 782 gear to render it a uniform, light khaki color for inspections, etc.

Semper Fidelis
Dick Gaines
Date: Sat, 5 Oct 2002 17:48:54 +0100
From: "Andrew Bamji" <andrewbamji@lineone.net> | This is Spam | Add to Address Book
To: wwi-l@raven.cc.ku.edu
Subject: RE: Re Blanco

Blanco came in khaki, white (for the band) and RAF blue for the Air Section when I was at school. Andrew Andrew Bamji andrewbamji@lineone.net http://website.lineone.net/~andrewbamji/index.htm
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Dick Gaines
Dick Gaines

October 5th, 2002, 11:23 pm #10

I worked for an old-time Marine SNCO back in '52--he was known to ocassionally send a boot out on a search for non-existent items. One day he instructed me to to find his old "ponyo" up at battalion supply and ask him for some "blanco" that he knew he had stashed away somewhere.

Uh oh!, I figured this was gonna be like another of his errands for a seabag-stretcher, etc.

As it turned out, I returned w/the blanco he wanted--as I recall, it was something like the old cakes/bars of laundry soap, but others (much later)remembered it as being in powder form. It was used back in the "Old Corps," apparently, to apply to 782 gear to render it a uniform, light khaki color for inspections, etc.

Semper Fidelis
Dick Gaines
The book, US Marine Corps In WW I 1917--1918, 1999, Osprey, page 38 mentions that...

"Web Gear And Equipment

Webbing was normally khaki coloured, but some of the early Marine webbing was olive green or "blancoed" green with a scrubbed-on preservative preparation."

Dick Gaines
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