Versatile.
Versatile.

June 2nd, 2015, 9:08 pm #11

and next to impossible to recognize in real time out in the field. First Their eyes are solid dark with no white sclera... This and the darkness of the skin and hair make it VERY difficult to distinguish facial features . This is also why many reports state they could not see the face IMHO.

Since our psychology in facial recognition is so strong it is one of the main ways we distinguish a living thing (like an animal for instance) from an inanimate object like a shadow. The science on facial recognition in humans is not clear but For me I notice parts (like nose, eyes, mouth, etc the put it together so I "see" the whole face..if parts are missing (as in blended together) or indistinguishable then it becomes increasingly difficult to orient facial features then put it together to recognize a living thing with a face.

In a couple of pictures I have, including the one I just posted, it literally took me two weeks to figure out facial orientation even though I knew it was a monster and i had taken a relatively clear picture of it.

The other thing that makes it difficult to "see" in pictures and out in the field is this: The facial proportions are not the same as humans. The skull configuration is different than homo sapian sapian (according to pictures I have taken) which puts the facial features in different proportions and slightly different places on the face.

So if parts are missing AND indistinguishable because of their animal camo and facial features are out of proportion, out of place and not where we are used to seeing them, then it is harder for us to understand what is in our visual field and to figure out facial orientation or even if a face is there.

As far as pictures are concerned it is FAR harder to take a clear picture than most would believe. Even the slightest amount of movement or shake of the camera, including depressing the button to take the bloody picture can result in motion blur. The slightest amount of motion blur can make the difference in being able to see and not being able to see especially if the picture has to be zoomed in. Holding the camera completely still for ONE FULL SECOND after the "click" is heard is critical to prevent motion blur.

Finally, Monster Hunter has stated something that is very true and I think is important. (Monster Hunter says a lot of important things sometimes even in passing) He stated on forum once that "Monsters will give you a single eye."

I have found in my pictures that i have captured only one side of the face or the monsters are literally observing me with "one eye" while the other eye or half of the face is obstructed or I take pictures of them and the face is turned so I only have a profile. This I believe is a very important behavior. If Monster Hunter was the only one seeing this behavior it is not so strong in terms of behavioral evidence but if he is seeing that behavior and I can corroborate it we may have stronger evidence of an actual behavioral pattern.

The reason this is important is that it is a behavior that will keep us from seeing all the facial features to determine if a face is there or not. Going back to what I said earlier... if we can't determine facial features we won't be able to "see" the face and they will blend into shadow or background. Turning the head to a profile or obstructing half the face gives us half of the features that we could possibly see to make a facial determination. Coupling that with their camo and and other things minimizes our chances of being able to recognize them in the field or in pictures.

C.
Would you guys explain what type camera you use and any settings?
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.Circlewalker
.Circlewalker

June 3rd, 2015, 11:20 am #12

The setting is on "landscape" and auto focus... so I don't have to try and focus out in the field. I do not try to look at the screen at all since it is too small is next to impossible to be able to distinguish one set of trees/leaves from another.

In order to just point and shoot certain strategies have to be used to maximize getting a successful hit if you are having trouble spotting them but know they are there.

One strategy i use is to "sweep" shoot an area with pictures in 180 degree arc. Each picture will be in a 30 degree interval which slightly overlaps. This gives me up to 3 pictures of any given area within the 180 degrees.

Here is an example:

First picture in sweep:



This may be all you get so you must look for shadow anomalies...second picture in sweep:



You may need to lighten up your screen settings to be able to see the detail... This is a blow up of the lower right of the picture





C.
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Versatile.
Versatile.

June 4th, 2015, 2:19 pm #13

i asked a few questions else where . this is the reply.

Steady hands and a high shutter speed can never be underestimated. However, you can develop the skills necessary to shoot steadier photos with a little practice.

Take a deep breath, let it halfway out as you press down to release the shutter. It should almost be a surprise exactly when the shutter clicks.

This advice holds true for every film camera and most prosumer to pro dSLRs. Point and shoot digital cameras and cell phones may experience more shutter lag, in which case, yes. Take your breath, let it halfway out, press the shutter and don't continue your breathing motion for a count of one-two. This should help mitigate natural body movement/hand shake in images.
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Versatile.
Versatile.

June 4th, 2015, 3:00 pm #14

The setting is on "landscape" and auto focus... so I don't have to try and focus out in the field. I do not try to look at the screen at all since it is too small is next to impossible to be able to distinguish one set of trees/leaves from another.

In order to just point and shoot certain strategies have to be used to maximize getting a successful hit if you are having trouble spotting them but know they are there.

One strategy i use is to "sweep" shoot an area with pictures in 180 degree arc. Each picture will be in a 30 degree interval which slightly overlaps. This gives me up to 3 pictures of any given area within the 180 degrees.

Here is an example:

First picture in sweep:



This may be all you get so you must look for shadow anomalies...second picture in sweep:



You may need to lighten up your screen settings to be able to see the detail... This is a blow up of the lower right of the picture





C.
That camera should be well able to take a decent shot, just looking at its technical specs.

Maximum Aperture Range F3.1 - F5.8

Maximum Shutter Speed 1/4000 of a second

Expanded ISO Maximum 6,400

Expanded ISO Minimum 80

Sounds like a pretty capable P&S, actually.


I don't know what you're using for a camera but you want something with f stop is 2.8 or lower. The lens I used was a 90-300mm with an f stop of 2.0

all handheld . so here is what i do , i is set the camera to manual. i pick a nice fast speed , say around 1/250th or higher , then i pick the aperture i want for good depth of field. i then use auto iso to float freely to lock exposure


http://www.city-data.com/forum/photogra ... hotos.html
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KJ
KJ

June 5th, 2015, 6:25 pm #15

i asked a few questions else where . this is the reply.

Steady hands and a high shutter speed can never be underestimated. However, you can develop the skills necessary to shoot steadier photos with a little practice.

Take a deep breath, let it halfway out as you press down to release the shutter. It should almost be a surprise exactly when the shutter clicks.

This advice holds true for every film camera and most prosumer to pro dSLRs. Point and shoot digital cameras and cell phones may experience more shutter lag, in which case, yes. Take your breath, let it halfway out, press the shutter and don't continue your breathing motion for a count of one-two. This should help mitigate natural body movement/hand shake in images.
Good tips on use of cameras in the research field. Wonder if anyone wears body cameras as potential back up as well as "extra eye" to catch what might be missed otherwise?
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Circlewalker
Circlewalker

June 5th, 2015, 9:40 pm #16

i asked a few questions else where . this is the reply.

Steady hands and a high shutter speed can never be underestimated. However, you can develop the skills necessary to shoot steadier photos with a little practice.

Take a deep breath, let it halfway out as you press down to release the shutter. It should almost be a surprise exactly when the shutter clicks.

This advice holds true for every film camera and most prosumer to pro dSLRs. Point and shoot digital cameras and cell phones may experience more shutter lag, in which case, yes. Take your breath, let it halfway out, press the shutter and don't continue your breathing motion for a count of one-two. This should help mitigate natural body movement/hand shake in images.
I had to learn the hard way through experience and asking knowledgeable people on this forum... The one variable that is not mentioned is... how steady anyone can hold a camera when standing at ground zero with activity going on all around...

C
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