let's discuss what i call the "Hammer"

let's discuss what i call the "Hammer"

woodswatcher
woodswatcher

May 29th, 2011, 3:53 am #1


in the event someone does harvest, kill, or obtain a monkee carcass, what happens next.

what would one do with a carcass of this magnitude? all sorts of possibilities unwind at this very realistic happenstance.

Ahhhhhh where the rubber meets the road and point of no return. the federal and state governments have a vested interest in every single possibility in this happenstance.

not only do you have both of these entities (Federal and State) looking into the legalities, you will have dozens of civil servant employees whose only job is to find a citizen who has done wrong for 40 hours a week 50 weeks a year looking into any legalities.

right now lets concentrate on the Feds. When the Fed's have a hard case- they go straight to the money trail. hey, thats what got Al Capone sent to Alcatraz. Money irregularities and tax evasion.

Death and Taxes.

but- the fed's have weapon that isn't discussed much. one that is probably one of the most encompassing laws of the land in existance.

the Lacey Act
http://www.animallaw.info/articles/ovuslaceyact.htm

some of the more inportant info is the following:
The Lacey Act, 16 U.S.C. §§ 3371-3378, protects both plants and wildlife by creating civil and criminal penalties for a wide array of violations. Most notably, the Act prohibits trade in wildlife, fish, and plants that have been illegally taken, possessed, transported or sold. Thus, the Act underscores other federal, state, and foreign laws protecting wildlife by making it a separate offense to take, possess, transport, or sell wildlife that has been taken in violation of those laws. The Act prohibits the falsification of documents for most shipments of wildlife (a criminal penalty) and prohibits the failure to mark wildlife shipments (civil penalty). The Lacey Act is administered by the Departments of the Interior, Commerce, and Agriculture through their respective agencies. These include the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, and Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

OKAY...did you read that slowly. three (3) Departments are in charge of the Lacey. amazing.

it reminds me of the Ron White Police azz kicking stand up.

" I didn't know how many of them it was gonna take to whip my azz"

" But i knew how many they were gonna use"


there's more good info

In 1988, the role of guiding or outfitting services were added to cover a new threat to big game species under the ambit of "sale." Prior to the amendment, big game guides who provided illegal hunts were immune to prosecution for violation based on commercial activity. The amendments also created a separate and distinct violation for the intended falsification of documents pertaining to the exporting, importing, or transporting of wildlife, fish, or plants. The felony provision of this part of the act was amended such that one could be convicted if he or she either knew of the import or export of the species or where he or she was involved in the sale or purchase of wildlife, fish, or plants with a market value greater than $350.

The Lacey Act now stands as one of the broadest and most comprehensive forces in the federal arsenal to combat wildlife crime. With increasing activity in international and domestic wildlife trafficking, the Act has evolved to become an important weapon to protect animals domestically and abroad.

For further discussion on the Lacey Act, see, The Lacey Act: America's Premier Weapon in the Fight Against Unlawful Wildlife Trafficking, by Robert S. Anderson, 16 Public Land Law Review (Public Land and Resources Law Review) 27, 1995.


from the above link, which has some pretty good stuff in it.

this law is the fall back charge that is at the Fed's disposal on ANYTHING wild, PLANT OR ANIMAL. when they can't get someone through normal means and charges, this is the curve ball. this is the folded up $20 bill they keep in their wallet for reserve "just such an emergency".

the Feds have added to this law several times and will continue to update it to their needs as they see fit.
when the Fed's throw this card down on the table. they yell out BAZINGA.

they won't need a Manslaughter or Murder conviction-
I gaurantee that they would offer a plea to the Lacey.
the Fed's dont use this on normal cases. they use the Lacey act as their secret weapon. for personal vandettas, for high profile cases and photo ops.


BTW,
a Federal Wildlife Official mentioned the seriousness of this act one time to me, within 5 minutes of discussion of the possibility of a monkee.

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 29th, 2011, 12:39 pm #2

in the bank if you do hunt for harvest and are successful...guaranteed someone is going to jail and if the feds want you they have the time, resources to make your life a nightmare...hunters...you better have a good solid plan...
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Zubaz
Zubaz

May 30th, 2011, 4:24 am #3

When the Georgia Boys did their stunt -- were they looked into by any of the groups mentioned ?
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 30th, 2011, 1:12 pm #4

if any government agency investigated them...
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woodswatcher
woodswatcher

May 30th, 2011, 3:47 pm #5

When the Georgia Boys did their stunt -- were they looked into by any of the groups mentioned ?
if the Feds thought they were even remotely serious, you can bet they did their homework on the situation.

i can tell you straight up that there are several here on the board that are checked up on routinely by Federal and State workers for various reasons involving monkee issues.

they read this board and several other boards daily. the amount of personal information they have on several posters is really amazing.
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Grumpy
Grumpy

May 30th, 2011, 5:30 pm #6

Big Brother also has access to our personal emails, especially if you use gmail, and all other accounts. Anyone who thinks they can't access what they want better pull their head out of the sand........... nothing in this cyber world is private, so remember to turn off your GPS tracking on your phone when in the woods or your location and movements is readily available by anyone with current technology, how do you think they are able to locate your cell phone if lost or stolen.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 30th, 2011, 6:18 pm #7

Use coded words to share information or write letters mailing them out waiting for a response like they did in the old days...to be honest I have suspicioned in the past but it may be imagination...

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woodswatcher
woodswatcher

May 30th, 2011, 7:13 pm #8

Carnivore is alive and well.

certain words key in and flag anything pertinent. Good Luck with keeping anything confidential, by ANY EMAIL MEANS.
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MissippiMike
MissippiMike

May 30th, 2011, 7:35 pm #9

Big Brother also has access to our personal emails, especially if you use gmail, and all other accounts. Anyone who thinks they can't access what they want better pull their head out of the sand........... nothing in this cyber world is private, so remember to turn off your GPS tracking on your phone when in the woods or your location and movements is readily available by anyone with current technology, how do you think they are able to locate your cell phone if lost or stolen.
that they can tell not only WHERE you are but WHERE you HAVE BEEN just by your cell phone. Don't know how true this is but it certainly would not surprise me. Looks like GPS much like Facebook is turning out to be a two-edged sword.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 30th, 2011, 9:56 pm #10


Tech Analyst Larry Magid: The Potential Is There To Track You, But Are The Safeguards?

(CBS) Larry Magid analyzes technology issues and devices for CBS News and CBSNews.com.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Imagine a world where you can be tracked anywhere you go. A decade ago that would have seemed like a paranoid delusion, but thanks to GPS-enabled cell phones and other technologies, it's more or less the way things now are.

Many of today's cell phones are equipped with global positioning systems that are capable of pinpointing your exact position. Soon, thanks to Federal Communications Commission (FCC) rules, all phones will be able to transmit your location. The question isn't whether you can be found, but how that information will be used and who will have access to it.
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