Hibernate or migrate...

Hibernate or migrate...

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 9th, 2010, 7:38 pm #1

Monsters that live in areas of extreme cold...would they migrate following the game animals or go into some type of hibernation?...

The purpose of this thread is to answer, IYO, why in colder climates where weather is inhospitable for months on end, there seems to be less Monster activity resulting in fewer reports...I do understand that in this weather there are fewer people in the wild to experience any Monster activity...

I firmly believe the weather here in the south has little to no effect on the Monsters simply because our large game animals do not migrate along with a variety of edible vegetation...also black bear may not hibernate here in the south if there is a food supply that remains year round...the sow with young will hibernate with her young but males along with female without young depending on food supply may not hibernate...

I do know when we have had any significant snow fall here, 2 to 3 inches, I haven't found any tracks or sign of Monster activity...would this mean they are aware of leaving sign or is it just to damn cold to get out and search for food?...
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woodswatcher
woodswatcher

November 10th, 2010, 12:26 am #2

but, i think they just hole up when it gets brutal. no matter where they are. a few days holed up and things get back to normal.
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Rick Tullos
Rick Tullos

November 10th, 2010, 12:42 am #3

Monsters that live in areas of extreme cold...would they migrate following the game animals or go into some type of hibernation?...

The purpose of this thread is to answer, IYO, why in colder climates where weather is inhospitable for months on end, there seems to be less Monster activity resulting in fewer reports...I do understand that in this weather there are fewer people in the wild to experience any Monster activity...

I firmly believe the weather here in the south has little to no effect on the Monsters simply because our large game animals do not migrate along with a variety of edible vegetation...also black bear may not hibernate here in the south if there is a food supply that remains year round...the sow with young will hibernate with her young but males along with female without young depending on food supply may not hibernate...

I do know when we have had any significant snow fall here, 2 to 3 inches, I haven't found any tracks or sign of Monster activity...would this mean they are aware of leaving sign or is it just to damn cold to get out and search for food?...
Researchers get out less in extreme cold, resulting in less reports????
I don't really think they migrate much or hibernate.
They would have to find food and stay active to stay warm.
I think at this these times they do more meat eating then they would normally.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 10th, 2010, 12:58 am #4

That these creatures would follow the migrating herds...I have no idea if they do but when I say migrate I'm thinking coming down to lower elevations as would deer and elk...

And yes I believe you are right about fewer people being in extreme weather in a dangerous mountainous terrain...kind of like if a tree falls and no one heard it did it make a sound...
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Hawkeyesasquatch
Hawkeyesasquatch

November 10th, 2010, 3:06 am #5

Monsters that live in areas of extreme cold...would they migrate following the game animals or go into some type of hibernation?...

The purpose of this thread is to answer, IYO, why in colder climates where weather is inhospitable for months on end, there seems to be less Monster activity resulting in fewer reports...I do understand that in this weather there are fewer people in the wild to experience any Monster activity...

I firmly believe the weather here in the south has little to no effect on the Monsters simply because our large game animals do not migrate along with a variety of edible vegetation...also black bear may not hibernate here in the south if there is a food supply that remains year round...the sow with young will hibernate with her young but males along with female without young depending on food supply may not hibernate...

I do know when we have had any significant snow fall here, 2 to 3 inches, I haven't found any tracks or sign of Monster activity...would this mean they are aware of leaving sign or is it just to damn cold to get out and search for food?...
Living here in Iowa, I have pondered this question many times and have yet to have an answer.I suspect that the juviniles and females migrate via the river systems towards SE Iowa when it gets very cold.SE iowa tends to have its own weather system at times in the winter, it has to do with the way winter storms set up and draw warm moist air northward.It is not uncommon for the Shimek forest of SE iowa(very monster active) to be 50 degrees while a snowstorm rages just 100 to 150 miles to the NW say from Dubuque to Desmoines.Considering there is little elavation change that is immpressive.I have wasted 6 years of research of not going out in the winter untill this last winter as I thought I had better things to do with my time when the daytime temp was 10 degrees or colder.This last winter I went out to my favorite research area in NE Iowa it was 15 degrees, and there was 20 inches of snow on the ground.I found footprints with a 53 inch step length walking down a steep hill.There is one thing you are overlooking in that there is absolutly no leaves on trees or vegitation, wich in turn limits there hiding places.I now no they are active here in the winter.Since I know where they hang out I can now really narrow it down in the winter. I simply cant wait untill the snow flies as I have an area really nailed down tight, and I mean tight.I just do not have an answer for you, but ask yourself this--If the juviniles and females migrate temporarily to SE Iowa then what about monsters in nothern Minnesota or Wisconsin where it is even colder.I do suspect as I said before that juviniles and females tend to head into SE iowa and I know if true the river system they follow.Let me get one more winter under my belt in my extremly active area and I will try to follow up.They are still very active now as of last week, I had tree knocks the minute I walked into my area.Since I have an very active area I will see and report to you there activity as the weather changes.
Last edited by tiny on November 10th, 2010, 11:54 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 10th, 2010, 2:50 pm #6

the winter weather is really not a factor...we get a few cold days and at times a flurry of snow but not significant enough to remain other than a few days...this is why I live here in the south...old bones can't adapt to the cold...

The mountainous regions are completely different therefore the question of migration following the herds or remaining close to bedding areas without venturing out miles for food which opens the question of what would these Monsters eat "if' they didn't follow the varying herds of large animals to lower and more hospitable weather?...I do believe if I lived in the mountains I would do my poking around in the valleys and lower elevations where there was still some type of vegetation along with larger animals for food...

When my daughter lived on the east side of Oregon they periodically had reports of sightings but then again where they lived the weather wasn't severe for month after month...other large animals remained in the area year round...

Hopefully you'll have some answers after this winter and we would appreciate you sharing your research...thanks for the post...
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woodswatcher
woodswatcher

November 10th, 2010, 5:25 pm #7

Living here in Iowa, I have pondered this question many times and have yet to have an answer.I suspect that the juviniles and females migrate via the river systems towards SE Iowa when it gets very cold.SE iowa tends to have its own weather system at times in the winter, it has to do with the way winter storms set up and draw warm moist air northward.It is not uncommon for the Shimek forest of SE iowa(very monster active) to be 50 degrees while a snowstorm rages just 100 to 150 miles to the NW say from Dubuque to Desmoines.Considering there is little elavation change that is immpressive.I have wasted 6 years of research of not going out in the winter untill this last winter as I thought I had better things to do with my time when the daytime temp was 10 degrees or colder.This last winter I went out to my favorite research area in NE Iowa it was 15 degrees, and there was 20 inches of snow on the ground.I found footprints with a 53 inch step length walking down a steep hill.There is one thing you are overlooking in that there is absolutly no leaves on trees or vegitation, wich in turn limits there hiding places.I now no they are active here in the winter.Since I know where they hang out I can now really narrow it down in the winter. I simply cant wait untill the snow flies as I have an area really nailed down tight, and I mean tight.I just do not have an answer for you, but ask yourself this--If the juviniles and females migrate temporarily to SE Iowa then what about monsters in nothern Minnesota or Wisconsin where it is even colder.I do suspect as I said before that juviniles and females tend to head into SE iowa and I know if true the river system they follow.Let me get one more winter under my belt in my extremly active area and I will try to follow up.They are still very active now as of last week, I had tree knocks the minute I walked into my area.Since I have an very active area I will see and report to you there activity as the weather changes.
eastern Oklahoma doesn't get much snow, but whenever we get 6-10 inches at one time we normally try to get out 3-4 days after to the snow. we almost always find tracks. usually far more than most and 3x we have found groups.

all of these tracks most always lead to unfrozen water.

our problem is ICE.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 10th, 2010, 6:27 pm #8

are they freshly made or a day or two old...what I'm driving at...do you think in these snow storms they hold up until their belly touches their backbone and that tongue is hung out needing a drink?...and IYO...do they strictly eat meat or are there other food sources available in the dead of winter?...

Yes I hear you about the ice...it does quite a bit of damage here when we have an ice storm...our power companies, water companies nor are our road maintenance folks geared for ice...pine trees worst nightmare is a bad ice storm...
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woodswatcher
woodswatcher

November 10th, 2010, 6:43 pm #9

i'd say 50% of the time they are older. you can tell from the thawed edges of the frozen snow. several times they have been really fresh.

but, they have all gone to water sources that were unfrozen.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 10th, 2010, 9:51 pm #10

Where as I think here they may hold up a day or two until the snow melts, warms up some or they know where to go without me finding any tracks...I do remember one hunt we had years back in a cold down pour...men walked back from the bottoms and saw Monster tracks inside the tire tracks...
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