Relativity of Simultaneity (Not Quite)

nakayama
nakayama

January 19th, 2015, 2:26 am #31

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relativity_of_simultaneity

Relativity of simultaneity

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Event B is simultaneous with A in the green reference frame, but it occurred before in the blue frame, and will occur later in the red frame.

The author here is writing as if the events actually occur in different order just because some observer or other is moving in relation to the events. The truth is that observers stationary to the events will observe events in different order. The order of events does not depend on motion, at all. It depends on the position of the observer in relation to the two or more events. In fact the observer at A will observe the event at A before the event at B, and the observer at B will observe the event at B before the event at A. So0 much BS here!

See link for the next picture.

Events A, B, and C occur in different order depending on the motion of the observer.

The author is misinforming again: The order of events does not depend on motion, it only depends upon the position of the observer with respect to the events, when the wave fronts from the events simultaneously meet the observer's eyes.


The white line represents a plane of simultaneity being moved from the past to the future.

In real life there is no plane of simultaneity. Each of us live in the present. Events close to us happen in the present. Events which we see being further away happened further into the past. Events happening now on the sun are 8 minutes into our future as far as light is concerned, further into the future as far as the effects of a CME. The 8 minute delay is not caused by motion, it is caused by distance from the Sun

In physics, the relativity of simultaneity is the concept that simultaneitywhether two events occur at the same timeis not absolute, but depends on the observer's reference frame.

Wrong-O; If a moving observer and a stationary observer are at the event at the same time, they will both see the event happen at the same time!


According to the special theory of relativity, it is impossible to say in an absolute sense whether two events occur at the same time if those events are separated in space.

Not true! If one is known to be located half way between two locations and sees that both events happen at the same time, they did absolutely happen at the same time!

Where an event occurs in a single placefor example, a car crashall observers will agree that both cars arrived at the point of impact at the same time. But where the events are separated in space, such as one car crash in London and another in New Delhi, the question of whether the events are simultaneous is relative: in some reference frames the two accidents may happen at the same time, in others (in a different state of motion relative to the events) the crash in London may occur first, and in still others the New Delhi crash may occur first.

Not true either, see above comment.

If we imagine one reference frame assigns precisely the same time to two events that are at different points in space, a reference frame that is moving relative to the first will generally assign different times to the two events. This is illustrated in the ladder paradox, a thought experiment which uses the example of a ladder moving at high speed through a garage.

In reality, the shrunken ladder/ garage is fiction. Einstein arrived at the idea of matter shrinking wrt observers in relative motion to objects by means of a Train Gedanken: For instants: the "measure the moving train gedanken:" As the front of the train passes the signalman at the far end of the platform, he simultaneously marks the platform and signals the rear signalman to mark the platform at the rear of the train. Einstein claims that due to the finite speed of light, the train will be measured shorter than it is, since the train moved while the signal traveled back to the rear signalman.

Now, stop and think: If the rear signalman sends the signal to the front of the train, while the train is moving, the same train will measure longer! Duh!


A mathematical form of the relativity of simultaneity ("local time") was introduced by Hendrik Lorentz in 1892, and physically interpreted (to first order in v/c) as the result of a synchronization using light signals by Henri Poincaré in 1900. However, both Lorentz and Poincaré based their conceptions on the aether as a preferred but undetectable frame of reference, and continued to distinguish between "true time" (in the aether) and "apparent" times for moving observers. It was Albert Einstein in 1905 who abandoned the (classical) aether and emphasized the significance of relativity of simultaneity to our understanding of space and time. He deduced the failure of absolute simultaneity from two stated assumptions:

1. The principle of relativitythe equivalence of inertial frames, such that the laws of physics apply equally in all inertial coordinate systems;

2. The constancy of the speed of light detected in empty space, [is](sic) independent of the relative motion of its source.

This second postulate is bogus! Most people acknowledge that light propagates away from a source in an expanding sphere, centered upon where the source was when the wavefront was emitted. All other observers in relative motion to the source, when the wave front was emitted, will see either aberration or Doppler shift. Do you need to consult Sherlock to see the fantasy?
In the picture of a moving passenger car and light, light will reach the roof and the floor at the same time (if it’s the same time for an observer in the car). Something is not clean.
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nakayama
nakayama

January 20th, 2015, 1:08 am #32

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relativity_of_simultaneity

Relativity of simultaneity

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Event B is simultaneous with A in the green reference frame, but it occurred before in the blue frame, and will occur later in the red frame.

The author here is writing as if the events actually occur in different order just because some observer or other is moving in relation to the events. The truth is that observers stationary to the events will observe events in different order. The order of events does not depend on motion, at all. It depends on the position of the observer in relation to the two or more events. In fact the observer at A will observe the event at A before the event at B, and the observer at B will observe the event at B before the event at A. So0 much BS here!

See link for the next picture.

Events A, B, and C occur in different order depending on the motion of the observer.

The author is misinforming again: The order of events does not depend on motion, it only depends upon the position of the observer with respect to the events, when the wave fronts from the events simultaneously meet the observer's eyes.


The white line represents a plane of simultaneity being moved from the past to the future.

In real life there is no plane of simultaneity. Each of us live in the present. Events close to us happen in the present. Events which we see being further away happened further into the past. Events happening now on the sun are 8 minutes into our future as far as light is concerned, further into the future as far as the effects of a CME. The 8 minute delay is not caused by motion, it is caused by distance from the Sun

In physics, the relativity of simultaneity is the concept that simultaneitywhether two events occur at the same timeis not absolute, but depends on the observer's reference frame.

Wrong-O; If a moving observer and a stationary observer are at the event at the same time, they will both see the event happen at the same time!


According to the special theory of relativity, it is impossible to say in an absolute sense whether two events occur at the same time if those events are separated in space.

Not true! If one is known to be located half way between two locations and sees that both events happen at the same time, they did absolutely happen at the same time!

Where an event occurs in a single placefor example, a car crashall observers will agree that both cars arrived at the point of impact at the same time. But where the events are separated in space, such as one car crash in London and another in New Delhi, the question of whether the events are simultaneous is relative: in some reference frames the two accidents may happen at the same time, in others (in a different state of motion relative to the events) the crash in London may occur first, and in still others the New Delhi crash may occur first.

Not true either, see above comment.

If we imagine one reference frame assigns precisely the same time to two events that are at different points in space, a reference frame that is moving relative to the first will generally assign different times to the two events. This is illustrated in the ladder paradox, a thought experiment which uses the example of a ladder moving at high speed through a garage.

In reality, the shrunken ladder/ garage is fiction. Einstein arrived at the idea of matter shrinking wrt observers in relative motion to objects by means of a Train Gedanken: For instants: the "measure the moving train gedanken:" As the front of the train passes the signalman at the far end of the platform, he simultaneously marks the platform and signals the rear signalman to mark the platform at the rear of the train. Einstein claims that due to the finite speed of light, the train will be measured shorter than it is, since the train moved while the signal traveled back to the rear signalman.

Now, stop and think: If the rear signalman sends the signal to the front of the train, while the train is moving, the same train will measure longer! Duh!


A mathematical form of the relativity of simultaneity ("local time") was introduced by Hendrik Lorentz in 1892, and physically interpreted (to first order in v/c) as the result of a synchronization using light signals by Henri Poincaré in 1900. However, both Lorentz and Poincaré based their conceptions on the aether as a preferred but undetectable frame of reference, and continued to distinguish between "true time" (in the aether) and "apparent" times for moving observers. It was Albert Einstein in 1905 who abandoned the (classical) aether and emphasized the significance of relativity of simultaneity to our understanding of space and time. He deduced the failure of absolute simultaneity from two stated assumptions:

1. The principle of relativitythe equivalence of inertial frames, such that the laws of physics apply equally in all inertial coordinate systems;

2. The constancy of the speed of light detected in empty space, [is](sic) independent of the relative motion of its source.

This second postulate is bogus! Most people acknowledge that light propagates away from a source in an expanding sphere, centered upon where the source was when the wavefront was emitted. All other observers in relative motion to the source, when the wave front was emitted, will see either aberration or Doppler shift. Do you need to consult Sherlock to see the fantasy?
The following is a question about a familiar illustration shown in books. In it, two light rays are emitted horizontally in a moving passenger car. And an observer stands on the ground sees that the end of one ray doesn’t reach yet the receding wall a little. Now, imagine the third ray emitted diagonally from the roof. Clearly, the product (to the wall) is longer. How is it explained ?
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nakayama
nakayama

January 21st, 2015, 2:20 am #33

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relativity_of_simultaneity

Relativity of simultaneity

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Event B is simultaneous with A in the green reference frame, but it occurred before in the blue frame, and will occur later in the red frame.

The author here is writing as if the events actually occur in different order just because some observer or other is moving in relation to the events. The truth is that observers stationary to the events will observe events in different order. The order of events does not depend on motion, at all. It depends on the position of the observer in relation to the two or more events. In fact the observer at A will observe the event at A before the event at B, and the observer at B will observe the event at B before the event at A. So0 much BS here!

See link for the next picture.

Events A, B, and C occur in different order depending on the motion of the observer.

The author is misinforming again: The order of events does not depend on motion, it only depends upon the position of the observer with respect to the events, when the wave fronts from the events simultaneously meet the observer's eyes.


The white line represents a plane of simultaneity being moved from the past to the future.

In real life there is no plane of simultaneity. Each of us live in the present. Events close to us happen in the present. Events which we see being further away happened further into the past. Events happening now on the sun are 8 minutes into our future as far as light is concerned, further into the future as far as the effects of a CME. The 8 minute delay is not caused by motion, it is caused by distance from the Sun

In physics, the relativity of simultaneity is the concept that simultaneitywhether two events occur at the same timeis not absolute, but depends on the observer's reference frame.

Wrong-O; If a moving observer and a stationary observer are at the event at the same time, they will both see the event happen at the same time!


According to the special theory of relativity, it is impossible to say in an absolute sense whether two events occur at the same time if those events are separated in space.

Not true! If one is known to be located half way between two locations and sees that both events happen at the same time, they did absolutely happen at the same time!

Where an event occurs in a single placefor example, a car crashall observers will agree that both cars arrived at the point of impact at the same time. But where the events are separated in space, such as one car crash in London and another in New Delhi, the question of whether the events are simultaneous is relative: in some reference frames the two accidents may happen at the same time, in others (in a different state of motion relative to the events) the crash in London may occur first, and in still others the New Delhi crash may occur first.

Not true either, see above comment.

If we imagine one reference frame assigns precisely the same time to two events that are at different points in space, a reference frame that is moving relative to the first will generally assign different times to the two events. This is illustrated in the ladder paradox, a thought experiment which uses the example of a ladder moving at high speed through a garage.

In reality, the shrunken ladder/ garage is fiction. Einstein arrived at the idea of matter shrinking wrt observers in relative motion to objects by means of a Train Gedanken: For instants: the "measure the moving train gedanken:" As the front of the train passes the signalman at the far end of the platform, he simultaneously marks the platform and signals the rear signalman to mark the platform at the rear of the train. Einstein claims that due to the finite speed of light, the train will be measured shorter than it is, since the train moved while the signal traveled back to the rear signalman.

Now, stop and think: If the rear signalman sends the signal to the front of the train, while the train is moving, the same train will measure longer! Duh!


A mathematical form of the relativity of simultaneity ("local time") was introduced by Hendrik Lorentz in 1892, and physically interpreted (to first order in v/c) as the result of a synchronization using light signals by Henri Poincaré in 1900. However, both Lorentz and Poincaré based their conceptions on the aether as a preferred but undetectable frame of reference, and continued to distinguish between "true time" (in the aether) and "apparent" times for moving observers. It was Albert Einstein in 1905 who abandoned the (classical) aether and emphasized the significance of relativity of simultaneity to our understanding of space and time. He deduced the failure of absolute simultaneity from two stated assumptions:

1. The principle of relativitythe equivalence of inertial frames, such that the laws of physics apply equally in all inertial coordinate systems;

2. The constancy of the speed of light detected in empty space, [is](sic) independent of the relative motion of its source.

This second postulate is bogus! Most people acknowledge that light propagates away from a source in an expanding sphere, centered upon where the source was when the wavefront was emitted. All other observers in relative motion to the source, when the wave front was emitted, will see either aberration or Doppler shift. Do you need to consult Sherlock to see the fantasy?
Allow me to rewrite yesterday’s post as follows.

The following is a question about a familiar illustration shown in books. In it, two light rays are emitted horizontally in a moving passenger car. Now, two rays are slanted at 5 degrees upward. The points on the walls where two rays hit will be different to two observers (in the car and stands on the ground).
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nakayama
nakayama

January 23rd, 2015, 7:32 am #34

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relativity_of_simultaneity

Relativity of simultaneity

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Event B is simultaneous with A in the green reference frame, but it occurred before in the blue frame, and will occur later in the red frame.

The author here is writing as if the events actually occur in different order just because some observer or other is moving in relation to the events. The truth is that observers stationary to the events will observe events in different order. The order of events does not depend on motion, at all. It depends on the position of the observer in relation to the two or more events. In fact the observer at A will observe the event at A before the event at B, and the observer at B will observe the event at B before the event at A. So0 much BS here!

See link for the next picture.

Events A, B, and C occur in different order depending on the motion of the observer.

The author is misinforming again: The order of events does not depend on motion, it only depends upon the position of the observer with respect to the events, when the wave fronts from the events simultaneously meet the observer's eyes.


The white line represents a plane of simultaneity being moved from the past to the future.

In real life there is no plane of simultaneity. Each of us live in the present. Events close to us happen in the present. Events which we see being further away happened further into the past. Events happening now on the sun are 8 minutes into our future as far as light is concerned, further into the future as far as the effects of a CME. The 8 minute delay is not caused by motion, it is caused by distance from the Sun

In physics, the relativity of simultaneity is the concept that simultaneitywhether two events occur at the same timeis not absolute, but depends on the observer's reference frame.

Wrong-O; If a moving observer and a stationary observer are at the event at the same time, they will both see the event happen at the same time!


According to the special theory of relativity, it is impossible to say in an absolute sense whether two events occur at the same time if those events are separated in space.

Not true! If one is known to be located half way between two locations and sees that both events happen at the same time, they did absolutely happen at the same time!

Where an event occurs in a single placefor example, a car crashall observers will agree that both cars arrived at the point of impact at the same time. But where the events are separated in space, such as one car crash in London and another in New Delhi, the question of whether the events are simultaneous is relative: in some reference frames the two accidents may happen at the same time, in others (in a different state of motion relative to the events) the crash in London may occur first, and in still others the New Delhi crash may occur first.

Not true either, see above comment.

If we imagine one reference frame assigns precisely the same time to two events that are at different points in space, a reference frame that is moving relative to the first will generally assign different times to the two events. This is illustrated in the ladder paradox, a thought experiment which uses the example of a ladder moving at high speed through a garage.

In reality, the shrunken ladder/ garage is fiction. Einstein arrived at the idea of matter shrinking wrt observers in relative motion to objects by means of a Train Gedanken: For instants: the "measure the moving train gedanken:" As the front of the train passes the signalman at the far end of the platform, he simultaneously marks the platform and signals the rear signalman to mark the platform at the rear of the train. Einstein claims that due to the finite speed of light, the train will be measured shorter than it is, since the train moved while the signal traveled back to the rear signalman.

Now, stop and think: If the rear signalman sends the signal to the front of the train, while the train is moving, the same train will measure longer! Duh!


A mathematical form of the relativity of simultaneity ("local time") was introduced by Hendrik Lorentz in 1892, and physically interpreted (to first order in v/c) as the result of a synchronization using light signals by Henri Poincaré in 1900. However, both Lorentz and Poincaré based their conceptions on the aether as a preferred but undetectable frame of reference, and continued to distinguish between "true time" (in the aether) and "apparent" times for moving observers. It was Albert Einstein in 1905 who abandoned the (classical) aether and emphasized the significance of relativity of simultaneity to our understanding of space and time. He deduced the failure of absolute simultaneity from two stated assumptions:

1. The principle of relativitythe equivalence of inertial frames, such that the laws of physics apply equally in all inertial coordinate systems;

2. The constancy of the speed of light detected in empty space, [is](sic) independent of the relative motion of its source.

This second postulate is bogus! Most people acknowledge that light propagates away from a source in an expanding sphere, centered upon where the source was when the wavefront was emitted. All other observers in relative motion to the source, when the wave front was emitted, will see either aberration or Doppler shift. Do you need to consult Sherlock to see the fantasy?
Allow me to rewrite my post (Dec 31) as follows.

Between two long mirrors, two laser beams form paths like continuous letter X (sent to the left). At each crossing point, interference fringes are visible. This interference fringes will be the same to all, including the one who is moving in a relative motion (to the mirror). "Relativity of simultaneity" seems to be unacceptable.
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nakayama
nakayama

January 28th, 2015, 12:34 am #35

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relativity_of_simultaneity

Relativity of simultaneity

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Event B is simultaneous with A in the green reference frame, but it occurred before in the blue frame, and will occur later in the red frame.

The author here is writing as if the events actually occur in different order just because some observer or other is moving in relation to the events. The truth is that observers stationary to the events will observe events in different order. The order of events does not depend on motion, at all. It depends on the position of the observer in relation to the two or more events. In fact the observer at A will observe the event at A before the event at B, and the observer at B will observe the event at B before the event at A. So0 much BS here!

See link for the next picture.

Events A, B, and C occur in different order depending on the motion of the observer.

The author is misinforming again: The order of events does not depend on motion, it only depends upon the position of the observer with respect to the events, when the wave fronts from the events simultaneously meet the observer's eyes.


The white line represents a plane of simultaneity being moved from the past to the future.

In real life there is no plane of simultaneity. Each of us live in the present. Events close to us happen in the present. Events which we see being further away happened further into the past. Events happening now on the sun are 8 minutes into our future as far as light is concerned, further into the future as far as the effects of a CME. The 8 minute delay is not caused by motion, it is caused by distance from the Sun

In physics, the relativity of simultaneity is the concept that simultaneitywhether two events occur at the same timeis not absolute, but depends on the observer's reference frame.

Wrong-O; If a moving observer and a stationary observer are at the event at the same time, they will both see the event happen at the same time!


According to the special theory of relativity, it is impossible to say in an absolute sense whether two events occur at the same time if those events are separated in space.

Not true! If one is known to be located half way between two locations and sees that both events happen at the same time, they did absolutely happen at the same time!

Where an event occurs in a single placefor example, a car crashall observers will agree that both cars arrived at the point of impact at the same time. But where the events are separated in space, such as one car crash in London and another in New Delhi, the question of whether the events are simultaneous is relative: in some reference frames the two accidents may happen at the same time, in others (in a different state of motion relative to the events) the crash in London may occur first, and in still others the New Delhi crash may occur first.

Not true either, see above comment.

If we imagine one reference frame assigns precisely the same time to two events that are at different points in space, a reference frame that is moving relative to the first will generally assign different times to the two events. This is illustrated in the ladder paradox, a thought experiment which uses the example of a ladder moving at high speed through a garage.

In reality, the shrunken ladder/ garage is fiction. Einstein arrived at the idea of matter shrinking wrt observers in relative motion to objects by means of a Train Gedanken: For instants: the "measure the moving train gedanken:" As the front of the train passes the signalman at the far end of the platform, he simultaneously marks the platform and signals the rear signalman to mark the platform at the rear of the train. Einstein claims that due to the finite speed of light, the train will be measured shorter than it is, since the train moved while the signal traveled back to the rear signalman.

Now, stop and think: If the rear signalman sends the signal to the front of the train, while the train is moving, the same train will measure longer! Duh!


A mathematical form of the relativity of simultaneity ("local time") was introduced by Hendrik Lorentz in 1892, and physically interpreted (to first order in v/c) as the result of a synchronization using light signals by Henri Poincaré in 1900. However, both Lorentz and Poincaré based their conceptions on the aether as a preferred but undetectable frame of reference, and continued to distinguish between "true time" (in the aether) and "apparent" times for moving observers. It was Albert Einstein in 1905 who abandoned the (classical) aether and emphasized the significance of relativity of simultaneity to our understanding of space and time. He deduced the failure of absolute simultaneity from two stated assumptions:

1. The principle of relativitythe equivalence of inertial frames, such that the laws of physics apply equally in all inertial coordinate systems;

2. The constancy of the speed of light detected in empty space, [is](sic) independent of the relative motion of its source.

This second postulate is bogus! Most people acknowledge that light propagates away from a source in an expanding sphere, centered upon where the source was when the wavefront was emitted. All other observers in relative motion to the source, when the wave front was emitted, will see either aberration or Doppler shift. Do you need to consult Sherlock to see the fantasy?
In front of an observer stands on the ground, a passenger car is moving. An illustration of books shows that two light rays are emitted from a light source (set at the center of the car). But now, replace light rays with a light sphere (or a circular wave seen from the observer). In an illustration about simultaneity, light sphere doesn’t follow passenger car’s motion. On the other hand, in an illustration about light clock, it (hemisphere) seems to follow passenger car’s motion. Am I wrong ?
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nakayama
nakayama

January 31st, 2015, 4:05 am #36

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relativity_of_simultaneity

Relativity of simultaneity

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Event B is simultaneous with A in the green reference frame, but it occurred before in the blue frame, and will occur later in the red frame.

The author here is writing as if the events actually occur in different order just because some observer or other is moving in relation to the events. The truth is that observers stationary to the events will observe events in different order. The order of events does not depend on motion, at all. It depends on the position of the observer in relation to the two or more events. In fact the observer at A will observe the event at A before the event at B, and the observer at B will observe the event at B before the event at A. So0 much BS here!

See link for the next picture.

Events A, B, and C occur in different order depending on the motion of the observer.

The author is misinforming again: The order of events does not depend on motion, it only depends upon the position of the observer with respect to the events, when the wave fronts from the events simultaneously meet the observer's eyes.


The white line represents a plane of simultaneity being moved from the past to the future.

In real life there is no plane of simultaneity. Each of us live in the present. Events close to us happen in the present. Events which we see being further away happened further into the past. Events happening now on the sun are 8 minutes into our future as far as light is concerned, further into the future as far as the effects of a CME. The 8 minute delay is not caused by motion, it is caused by distance from the Sun

In physics, the relativity of simultaneity is the concept that simultaneitywhether two events occur at the same timeis not absolute, but depends on the observer's reference frame.

Wrong-O; If a moving observer and a stationary observer are at the event at the same time, they will both see the event happen at the same time!


According to the special theory of relativity, it is impossible to say in an absolute sense whether two events occur at the same time if those events are separated in space.

Not true! If one is known to be located half way between two locations and sees that both events happen at the same time, they did absolutely happen at the same time!

Where an event occurs in a single placefor example, a car crashall observers will agree that both cars arrived at the point of impact at the same time. But where the events are separated in space, such as one car crash in London and another in New Delhi, the question of whether the events are simultaneous is relative: in some reference frames the two accidents may happen at the same time, in others (in a different state of motion relative to the events) the crash in London may occur first, and in still others the New Delhi crash may occur first.

Not true either, see above comment.

If we imagine one reference frame assigns precisely the same time to two events that are at different points in space, a reference frame that is moving relative to the first will generally assign different times to the two events. This is illustrated in the ladder paradox, a thought experiment which uses the example of a ladder moving at high speed through a garage.

In reality, the shrunken ladder/ garage is fiction. Einstein arrived at the idea of matter shrinking wrt observers in relative motion to objects by means of a Train Gedanken: For instants: the "measure the moving train gedanken:" As the front of the train passes the signalman at the far end of the platform, he simultaneously marks the platform and signals the rear signalman to mark the platform at the rear of the train. Einstein claims that due to the finite speed of light, the train will be measured shorter than it is, since the train moved while the signal traveled back to the rear signalman.

Now, stop and think: If the rear signalman sends the signal to the front of the train, while the train is moving, the same train will measure longer! Duh!


A mathematical form of the relativity of simultaneity ("local time") was introduced by Hendrik Lorentz in 1892, and physically interpreted (to first order in v/c) as the result of a synchronization using light signals by Henri Poincaré in 1900. However, both Lorentz and Poincaré based their conceptions on the aether as a preferred but undetectable frame of reference, and continued to distinguish between "true time" (in the aether) and "apparent" times for moving observers. It was Albert Einstein in 1905 who abandoned the (classical) aether and emphasized the significance of relativity of simultaneity to our understanding of space and time. He deduced the failure of absolute simultaneity from two stated assumptions:

1. The principle of relativitythe equivalence of inertial frames, such that the laws of physics apply equally in all inertial coordinate systems;

2. The constancy of the speed of light detected in empty space, [is](sic) independent of the relative motion of its source.

This second postulate is bogus! Most people acknowledge that light propagates away from a source in an expanding sphere, centered upon where the source was when the wavefront was emitted. All other observers in relative motion to the source, when the wave front was emitted, will see either aberration or Doppler shift. Do you need to consult Sherlock to see the fantasy?
This is a thought experiment about simultaneity. I myself am not certain. So, regard this as a problem posing, please.

Imagine optional two points A, B (at a standstill) in an inertial frame. It’s possible to settle a light source C at a position in the same distance from the two points A, B. By the above, simultaneity of two points A, B will be guaranteed. Thus, simultaneity of whole frame will be guaranteed also.

But, how about between different inertial frame ? From the above, if simultaneity is broken between different inertial frame, simultaneity will probably be broken always between optional different inertial frames (frames each will have their own simultaneity). Now, in the above picture, suppose that two points A, B are receding (symmetrically with respect to C) at the same speed. Simultaneity will be guaranteed.
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nakayama
nakayama

January 31st, 2015, 11:39 pm #37

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relativity_of_simultaneity

Relativity of simultaneity

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Event B is simultaneous with A in the green reference frame, but it occurred before in the blue frame, and will occur later in the red frame.

The author here is writing as if the events actually occur in different order just because some observer or other is moving in relation to the events. The truth is that observers stationary to the events will observe events in different order. The order of events does not depend on motion, at all. It depends on the position of the observer in relation to the two or more events. In fact the observer at A will observe the event at A before the event at B, and the observer at B will observe the event at B before the event at A. So0 much BS here!

See link for the next picture.

Events A, B, and C occur in different order depending on the motion of the observer.

The author is misinforming again: The order of events does not depend on motion, it only depends upon the position of the observer with respect to the events, when the wave fronts from the events simultaneously meet the observer's eyes.


The white line represents a plane of simultaneity being moved from the past to the future.

In real life there is no plane of simultaneity. Each of us live in the present. Events close to us happen in the present. Events which we see being further away happened further into the past. Events happening now on the sun are 8 minutes into our future as far as light is concerned, further into the future as far as the effects of a CME. The 8 minute delay is not caused by motion, it is caused by distance from the Sun

In physics, the relativity of simultaneity is the concept that simultaneitywhether two events occur at the same timeis not absolute, but depends on the observer's reference frame.

Wrong-O; If a moving observer and a stationary observer are at the event at the same time, they will both see the event happen at the same time!


According to the special theory of relativity, it is impossible to say in an absolute sense whether two events occur at the same time if those events are separated in space.

Not true! If one is known to be located half way between two locations and sees that both events happen at the same time, they did absolutely happen at the same time!

Where an event occurs in a single placefor example, a car crashall observers will agree that both cars arrived at the point of impact at the same time. But where the events are separated in space, such as one car crash in London and another in New Delhi, the question of whether the events are simultaneous is relative: in some reference frames the two accidents may happen at the same time, in others (in a different state of motion relative to the events) the crash in London may occur first, and in still others the New Delhi crash may occur first.

Not true either, see above comment.

If we imagine one reference frame assigns precisely the same time to two events that are at different points in space, a reference frame that is moving relative to the first will generally assign different times to the two events. This is illustrated in the ladder paradox, a thought experiment which uses the example of a ladder moving at high speed through a garage.

In reality, the shrunken ladder/ garage is fiction. Einstein arrived at the idea of matter shrinking wrt observers in relative motion to objects by means of a Train Gedanken: For instants: the "measure the moving train gedanken:" As the front of the train passes the signalman at the far end of the platform, he simultaneously marks the platform and signals the rear signalman to mark the platform at the rear of the train. Einstein claims that due to the finite speed of light, the train will be measured shorter than it is, since the train moved while the signal traveled back to the rear signalman.

Now, stop and think: If the rear signalman sends the signal to the front of the train, while the train is moving, the same train will measure longer! Duh!


A mathematical form of the relativity of simultaneity ("local time") was introduced by Hendrik Lorentz in 1892, and physically interpreted (to first order in v/c) as the result of a synchronization using light signals by Henri Poincaré in 1900. However, both Lorentz and Poincaré based their conceptions on the aether as a preferred but undetectable frame of reference, and continued to distinguish between "true time" (in the aether) and "apparent" times for moving observers. It was Albert Einstein in 1905 who abandoned the (classical) aether and emphasized the significance of relativity of simultaneity to our understanding of space and time. He deduced the failure of absolute simultaneity from two stated assumptions:

1. The principle of relativitythe equivalence of inertial frames, such that the laws of physics apply equally in all inertial coordinate systems;

2. The constancy of the speed of light detected in empty space, [is](sic) independent of the relative motion of its source.

This second postulate is bogus! Most people acknowledge that light propagates away from a source in an expanding sphere, centered upon where the source was when the wavefront was emitted. All other observers in relative motion to the source, when the wave front was emitted, will see either aberration or Doppler shift. Do you need to consult Sherlock to see the fantasy?
Allow me to rewrite yesterday’s post, please.

Imagine optional two points A, B (at a standstill) in an inertial frame. It’s possible to settle a light source C at the position in the same distance from two points A, B. By the above, simultaneity of two points A, B will be guaranteed. So, simultaneity between every point of this frame will be guaranteed also.

But, how about between different inertial frame ? In the above, suppose that two points A, B are receding (symmetrically with respect to C) at the same speed. By the above, simultaneity of A, B will be guaranteed. So, simultaneity between two optional inertial frames and also between optional inertial frames will be guaranteed.
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nakayama
nakayama

February 4th, 2015, 1:05 am #38

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relativity_of_simultaneity

Relativity of simultaneity

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Event B is simultaneous with A in the green reference frame, but it occurred before in the blue frame, and will occur later in the red frame.

The author here is writing as if the events actually occur in different order just because some observer or other is moving in relation to the events. The truth is that observers stationary to the events will observe events in different order. The order of events does not depend on motion, at all. It depends on the position of the observer in relation to the two or more events. In fact the observer at A will observe the event at A before the event at B, and the observer at B will observe the event at B before the event at A. So0 much BS here!

See link for the next picture.

Events A, B, and C occur in different order depending on the motion of the observer.

The author is misinforming again: The order of events does not depend on motion, it only depends upon the position of the observer with respect to the events, when the wave fronts from the events simultaneously meet the observer's eyes.


The white line represents a plane of simultaneity being moved from the past to the future.

In real life there is no plane of simultaneity. Each of us live in the present. Events close to us happen in the present. Events which we see being further away happened further into the past. Events happening now on the sun are 8 minutes into our future as far as light is concerned, further into the future as far as the effects of a CME. The 8 minute delay is not caused by motion, it is caused by distance from the Sun

In physics, the relativity of simultaneity is the concept that simultaneitywhether two events occur at the same timeis not absolute, but depends on the observer's reference frame.

Wrong-O; If a moving observer and a stationary observer are at the event at the same time, they will both see the event happen at the same time!


According to the special theory of relativity, it is impossible to say in an absolute sense whether two events occur at the same time if those events are separated in space.

Not true! If one is known to be located half way between two locations and sees that both events happen at the same time, they did absolutely happen at the same time!

Where an event occurs in a single placefor example, a car crashall observers will agree that both cars arrived at the point of impact at the same time. But where the events are separated in space, such as one car crash in London and another in New Delhi, the question of whether the events are simultaneous is relative: in some reference frames the two accidents may happen at the same time, in others (in a different state of motion relative to the events) the crash in London may occur first, and in still others the New Delhi crash may occur first.

Not true either, see above comment.

If we imagine one reference frame assigns precisely the same time to two events that are at different points in space, a reference frame that is moving relative to the first will generally assign different times to the two events. This is illustrated in the ladder paradox, a thought experiment which uses the example of a ladder moving at high speed through a garage.

In reality, the shrunken ladder/ garage is fiction. Einstein arrived at the idea of matter shrinking wrt observers in relative motion to objects by means of a Train Gedanken: For instants: the "measure the moving train gedanken:" As the front of the train passes the signalman at the far end of the platform, he simultaneously marks the platform and signals the rear signalman to mark the platform at the rear of the train. Einstein claims that due to the finite speed of light, the train will be measured shorter than it is, since the train moved while the signal traveled back to the rear signalman.

Now, stop and think: If the rear signalman sends the signal to the front of the train, while the train is moving, the same train will measure longer! Duh!


A mathematical form of the relativity of simultaneity ("local time") was introduced by Hendrik Lorentz in 1892, and physically interpreted (to first order in v/c) as the result of a synchronization using light signals by Henri Poincaré in 1900. However, both Lorentz and Poincaré based their conceptions on the aether as a preferred but undetectable frame of reference, and continued to distinguish between "true time" (in the aether) and "apparent" times for moving observers. It was Albert Einstein in 1905 who abandoned the (classical) aether and emphasized the significance of relativity of simultaneity to our understanding of space and time. He deduced the failure of absolute simultaneity from two stated assumptions:

1. The principle of relativitythe equivalence of inertial frames, such that the laws of physics apply equally in all inertial coordinate systems;

2. The constancy of the speed of light detected in empty space, [is](sic) independent of the relative motion of its source.

This second postulate is bogus! Most people acknowledge that light propagates away from a source in an expanding sphere, centered upon where the source was when the wavefront was emitted. All other observers in relative motion to the source, when the wave front was emitted, will see either aberration or Doppler shift. Do you need to consult Sherlock to see the fantasy?
Allow me to rewrite again the latter half of my above post. Only Newton’s absolute time will be flowing.

But, how about between different inertial frame ? In the above, suppose that an equilateral triangle (C is the apex) is enlarging at a constant speed. By the above, simultaneity of A, B will be guaranteed. So, simultaneity between optional two inertial frames will be guaranteed also.
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nakayama
nakayama

February 24th, 2015, 12:16 am #39

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relativity_of_simultaneity

Relativity of simultaneity

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Event B is simultaneous with A in the green reference frame, but it occurred before in the blue frame, and will occur later in the red frame.

The author here is writing as if the events actually occur in different order just because some observer or other is moving in relation to the events. The truth is that observers stationary to the events will observe events in different order. The order of events does not depend on motion, at all. It depends on the position of the observer in relation to the two or more events. In fact the observer at A will observe the event at A before the event at B, and the observer at B will observe the event at B before the event at A. So0 much BS here!

See link for the next picture.

Events A, B, and C occur in different order depending on the motion of the observer.

The author is misinforming again: The order of events does not depend on motion, it only depends upon the position of the observer with respect to the events, when the wave fronts from the events simultaneously meet the observer's eyes.


The white line represents a plane of simultaneity being moved from the past to the future.

In real life there is no plane of simultaneity. Each of us live in the present. Events close to us happen in the present. Events which we see being further away happened further into the past. Events happening now on the sun are 8 minutes into our future as far as light is concerned, further into the future as far as the effects of a CME. The 8 minute delay is not caused by motion, it is caused by distance from the Sun

In physics, the relativity of simultaneity is the concept that simultaneitywhether two events occur at the same timeis not absolute, but depends on the observer's reference frame.

Wrong-O; If a moving observer and a stationary observer are at the event at the same time, they will both see the event happen at the same time!


According to the special theory of relativity, it is impossible to say in an absolute sense whether two events occur at the same time if those events are separated in space.

Not true! If one is known to be located half way between two locations and sees that both events happen at the same time, they did absolutely happen at the same time!

Where an event occurs in a single placefor example, a car crashall observers will agree that both cars arrived at the point of impact at the same time. But where the events are separated in space, such as one car crash in London and another in New Delhi, the question of whether the events are simultaneous is relative: in some reference frames the two accidents may happen at the same time, in others (in a different state of motion relative to the events) the crash in London may occur first, and in still others the New Delhi crash may occur first.

Not true either, see above comment.

If we imagine one reference frame assigns precisely the same time to two events that are at different points in space, a reference frame that is moving relative to the first will generally assign different times to the two events. This is illustrated in the ladder paradox, a thought experiment which uses the example of a ladder moving at high speed through a garage.

In reality, the shrunken ladder/ garage is fiction. Einstein arrived at the idea of matter shrinking wrt observers in relative motion to objects by means of a Train Gedanken: For instants: the "measure the moving train gedanken:" As the front of the train passes the signalman at the far end of the platform, he simultaneously marks the platform and signals the rear signalman to mark the platform at the rear of the train. Einstein claims that due to the finite speed of light, the train will be measured shorter than it is, since the train moved while the signal traveled back to the rear signalman.

Now, stop and think: If the rear signalman sends the signal to the front of the train, while the train is moving, the same train will measure longer! Duh!


A mathematical form of the relativity of simultaneity ("local time") was introduced by Hendrik Lorentz in 1892, and physically interpreted (to first order in v/c) as the result of a synchronization using light signals by Henri Poincaré in 1900. However, both Lorentz and Poincaré based their conceptions on the aether as a preferred but undetectable frame of reference, and continued to distinguish between "true time" (in the aether) and "apparent" times for moving observers. It was Albert Einstein in 1905 who abandoned the (classical) aether and emphasized the significance of relativity of simultaneity to our understanding of space and time. He deduced the failure of absolute simultaneity from two stated assumptions:

1. The principle of relativitythe equivalence of inertial frames, such that the laws of physics apply equally in all inertial coordinate systems;

2. The constancy of the speed of light detected in empty space, [is](sic) independent of the relative motion of its source.

This second postulate is bogus! Most people acknowledge that light propagates away from a source in an expanding sphere, centered upon where the source was when the wavefront was emitted. All other observers in relative motion to the source, when the wave front was emitted, will see either aberration or Doppler shift. Do you need to consult Sherlock to see the fantasy?
To above my post (Feb 3), allow me to add "(the three points each is in an inertial frame)". after "is enlarging at a constant speed".
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nakayama
nakayama

February 28th, 2015, 12:35 am #40

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relativity_of_simultaneity

Relativity of simultaneity

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Event B is simultaneous with A in the green reference frame, but it occurred before in the blue frame, and will occur later in the red frame.

The author here is writing as if the events actually occur in different order just because some observer or other is moving in relation to the events. The truth is that observers stationary to the events will observe events in different order. The order of events does not depend on motion, at all. It depends on the position of the observer in relation to the two or more events. In fact the observer at A will observe the event at A before the event at B, and the observer at B will observe the event at B before the event at A. So0 much BS here!

See link for the next picture.

Events A, B, and C occur in different order depending on the motion of the observer.

The author is misinforming again: The order of events does not depend on motion, it only depends upon the position of the observer with respect to the events, when the wave fronts from the events simultaneously meet the observer's eyes.


The white line represents a plane of simultaneity being moved from the past to the future.

In real life there is no plane of simultaneity. Each of us live in the present. Events close to us happen in the present. Events which we see being further away happened further into the past. Events happening now on the sun are 8 minutes into our future as far as light is concerned, further into the future as far as the effects of a CME. The 8 minute delay is not caused by motion, it is caused by distance from the Sun

In physics, the relativity of simultaneity is the concept that simultaneitywhether two events occur at the same timeis not absolute, but depends on the observer's reference frame.

Wrong-O; If a moving observer and a stationary observer are at the event at the same time, they will both see the event happen at the same time!


According to the special theory of relativity, it is impossible to say in an absolute sense whether two events occur at the same time if those events are separated in space.

Not true! If one is known to be located half way between two locations and sees that both events happen at the same time, they did absolutely happen at the same time!

Where an event occurs in a single placefor example, a car crashall observers will agree that both cars arrived at the point of impact at the same time. But where the events are separated in space, such as one car crash in London and another in New Delhi, the question of whether the events are simultaneous is relative: in some reference frames the two accidents may happen at the same time, in others (in a different state of motion relative to the events) the crash in London may occur first, and in still others the New Delhi crash may occur first.

Not true either, see above comment.

If we imagine one reference frame assigns precisely the same time to two events that are at different points in space, a reference frame that is moving relative to the first will generally assign different times to the two events. This is illustrated in the ladder paradox, a thought experiment which uses the example of a ladder moving at high speed through a garage.

In reality, the shrunken ladder/ garage is fiction. Einstein arrived at the idea of matter shrinking wrt observers in relative motion to objects by means of a Train Gedanken: For instants: the "measure the moving train gedanken:" As the front of the train passes the signalman at the far end of the platform, he simultaneously marks the platform and signals the rear signalman to mark the platform at the rear of the train. Einstein claims that due to the finite speed of light, the train will be measured shorter than it is, since the train moved while the signal traveled back to the rear signalman.

Now, stop and think: If the rear signalman sends the signal to the front of the train, while the train is moving, the same train will measure longer! Duh!


A mathematical form of the relativity of simultaneity ("local time") was introduced by Hendrik Lorentz in 1892, and physically interpreted (to first order in v/c) as the result of a synchronization using light signals by Henri Poincaré in 1900. However, both Lorentz and Poincaré based their conceptions on the aether as a preferred but undetectable frame of reference, and continued to distinguish between "true time" (in the aether) and "apparent" times for moving observers. It was Albert Einstein in 1905 who abandoned the (classical) aether and emphasized the significance of relativity of simultaneity to our understanding of space and time. He deduced the failure of absolute simultaneity from two stated assumptions:

1. The principle of relativitythe equivalence of inertial frames, such that the laws of physics apply equally in all inertial coordinate systems;

2. The constancy of the speed of light detected in empty space, [is](sic) independent of the relative motion of its source.

This second postulate is bogus! Most people acknowledge that light propagates away from a source in an expanding sphere, centered upon where the source was when the wavefront was emitted. All other observers in relative motion to the source, when the wave front was emitted, will see either aberration or Doppler shift. Do you need to consult Sherlock to see the fantasy?
In a moving passenger car, planetarium is projected. Position of stars will be the same also to an observer stands on the ground. Light sphere will follow passenger car’s motion. Simultaneity will be absolute.
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