Light Rays in a Moving Passenger Car

Light Rays in a Moving Passenger Car

nakayama
nakayama

November 10th, 2017, 4:20 am #1

A passenger car is standing. From the same height of the front and the rear inner walls each, a light ray is being sent downward at a 5 degree. At the center of the car, a tiny sensor is set. The sensor responds to two rays and the third light source is lighting. Now, the other passenger car is passing by. From this passenger car, the third light will be visible also. Regardless of its speed.

Above picture will show that almost all the similar pictures (Light Rays in a Moving Passenger Car) in books are wrong. Only the emission theory will be possible to explain these.

In outer space, a mirror is reflecting a star light. It is evident that propagation of reflected light and incident light is different (reflected light follows the emission theory).
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nakayama
nakayama

November 12th, 2017, 1:44 am #2

On following pictures that show light rays in a moving passenger car, the formula of Lorentz contraction will be invalid.
1) From a light source set on the rear inner wall, a light ray (slanted downward at a 5 degrees) is being sent to a mirror on the front wall. Light path draws oblique sides of isosceles triangle.
2) In above picture, the light source is somewhat apart from the rear inner wall. Light path does not draw isosceles triangle.
3) Two light sources each set on the rear wall and the front wall is sending a light ray to the facing wall. Light path each is one way.
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nakayama
nakayama

December 9th, 2017, 5:08 am #3

A passenger car is standing. From the same height of the front and the rear inner walls each, a light ray is being sent downward at a 5 degree. At the center of the car, a tiny sensor is set. The sensor responds to two rays and the third light source is lighting. Now, the other passenger car is passing by. From this passenger car, the third light will be visible also. Regardless of its speed.

Above picture will show that almost all the similar pictures (Light Rays in a Moving Passenger Car) in books are wrong. Only the emission theory will be possible to explain these.

In outer space, a mirror is reflecting a star light. It is evident that propagation of reflected light and incident light is different (reflected light follows the emission theory).
There are two passenger cars. In each passenger car, a light source is set on the right inner wall and is sending a light ray (horizontally) to the left wall. In front of an observer (stands on the ground), one passenger car is moving to the right and the other passenger car is to the left (at the same speed). How does relativity explain ?
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nakayama
nakayama

December 11th, 2017, 6:46 am #4

A passenger car is standing. From the same height of the front and the rear inner walls each, a light ray is being sent downward at a 5 degree. At the center of the car, a tiny sensor is set. The sensor responds to two rays and the third light source is lighting. Now, the other passenger car is passing by. From this passenger car, the third light will be visible also. Regardless of its speed.

Above picture will show that almost all the similar pictures (Light Rays in a Moving Passenger Car) in books are wrong. Only the emission theory will be possible to explain these.

In outer space, a mirror is reflecting a star light. It is evident that propagation of reflected light and incident light is different (reflected light follows the emission theory).
When there are plural light sources in a moving passenger car, pictures shown in books will not stand up.
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nakayama
nakayama

December 12th, 2017, 4:19 am #5

A passenger car is standing. From the same height of the front and the rear inner walls each, a light ray is being sent downward at a 5 degree. At the center of the car, a tiny sensor is set. The sensor responds to two rays and the third light source is lighting. Now, the other passenger car is passing by. From this passenger car, the third light will be visible also. Regardless of its speed.

Above picture will show that almost all the similar pictures (Light Rays in a Moving Passenger Car) in books are wrong. Only the emission theory will be possible to explain these.

In outer space, a mirror is reflecting a star light. It is evident that propagation of reflected light and incident light is different (reflected light follows the emission theory).
In a moving passenger car, a light ray is being sent. On the ground, there is an observer. In a picture on a light clock, the light ray follows passenger car's motion. In a picture on relativity of simultaneity, it doesn't (by spherical waves, more clear, will be).
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nakayama
nakayama

December 12th, 2017, 4:21 am #6

A passenger car is standing. From the same height of the front and the rear inner walls each, a light ray is being sent downward at a 5 degree. At the center of the car, a tiny sensor is set. The sensor responds to two rays and the third light source is lighting. Now, the other passenger car is passing by. From this passenger car, the third light will be visible also. Regardless of its speed.

Above picture will show that almost all the similar pictures (Light Rays in a Moving Passenger Car) in books are wrong. Only the emission theory will be possible to explain these.

In outer space, a mirror is reflecting a star light. It is evident that propagation of reflected light and incident light is different (reflected light follows the emission theory).
In a moving passenger car, planetarium is projected. Position of stars will be the same also to an observer stands on the ground. Spherical waves will follow passenger car's motion.
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nakayama
nakayama

December 12th, 2017, 4:26 am #7

A passenger car is standing. From the same height of the front and the rear inner walls each, a light ray is being sent downward at a 5 degree. At the center of the car, a tiny sensor is set. The sensor responds to two rays and the third light source is lighting. Now, the other passenger car is passing by. From this passenger car, the third light will be visible also. Regardless of its speed.

Above picture will show that almost all the similar pictures (Light Rays in a Moving Passenger Car) in books are wrong. Only the emission theory will be possible to explain these.

In outer space, a mirror is reflecting a star light. It is evident that propagation of reflected light and incident light is different (reflected light follows the emission theory).
On the moon's surface, there is a passenger car. To the roof, waves of sun-light (plane waves) are coming horizontally. In the roof, there is a small hole. When the passenger car moves to the right (or to the left), a point of light projected on the floor will move.

Moon's motion will have an effect (on the point of light) also. The angle of light ray (in the passenger car) will not be 90 degrees. Aether will be measurable.
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nakayama
nakayama

December 12th, 2017, 4:28 am #8

A passenger car is standing. From the same height of the front and the rear inner walls each, a light ray is being sent downward at a 5 degree. At the center of the car, a tiny sensor is set. The sensor responds to two rays and the third light source is lighting. Now, the other passenger car is passing by. From this passenger car, the third light will be visible also. Regardless of its speed.

Above picture will show that almost all the similar pictures (Light Rays in a Moving Passenger Car) in books are wrong. Only the emission theory will be possible to explain these.

In outer space, a mirror is reflecting a star light. It is evident that propagation of reflected light and incident light is different (reflected light follows the emission theory).
From the roof of a passenger car, several light rays are emitted down radially (at intervals of ten degrees). How is this moving passenger car explained ?
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nakayama
nakayama

December 12th, 2017, 4:31 am #9

A passenger car is standing. From the same height of the front and the rear inner walls each, a light ray is being sent downward at a 5 degree. At the center of the car, a tiny sensor is set. The sensor responds to two rays and the third light source is lighting. Now, the other passenger car is passing by. From this passenger car, the third light will be visible also. Regardless of its speed.

Above picture will show that almost all the similar pictures (Light Rays in a Moving Passenger Car) in books are wrong. Only the emission theory will be possible to explain these.

In outer space, a mirror is reflecting a star light. It is evident that propagation of reflected light and incident light is different (reflected light follows the emission theory).
From the roof of a passenger car, light ray is emitted diagonally downward (to the right at a 45 degree angle). One passenger car is moving to the right, the other passenger car is moving to the left at the same speed. To an observer who stands on the ground, the length of two light rays is different.
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nakayama
nakayama

December 12th, 2017, 4:36 am #10

A passenger car is standing. From the same height of the front and the rear inner walls each, a light ray is being sent downward at a 5 degree. At the center of the car, a tiny sensor is set. The sensor responds to two rays and the third light source is lighting. Now, the other passenger car is passing by. From this passenger car, the third light will be visible also. Regardless of its speed.

Above picture will show that almost all the similar pictures (Light Rays in a Moving Passenger Car) in books are wrong. Only the emission theory will be possible to explain these.

In outer space, a mirror is reflecting a star light. It is evident that propagation of reflected light and incident light is different (reflected light follows the emission theory).
A passenger car is moving to the right. A light ray (frequency is constant) is sent from the source set on the rear wall and is reflected by the front wall and returns to the rear wall. Path forms angle bracket > (acute angle). There is an observer on the ground. In front of him, imagine a vertical line. The passenger car passes the line. Frequency of two light paths is different and wavelength is the same (number of waves is an invariant). According to that formula: v = f λ, light speed is different.

Above picture seems to show also that pictures on relativity of simultaneity or on Lorentz contraction (a moving passenger car is shown in books) must be reexamined.
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