Better Putterface Impact Pattern

Better Putterface Impact Pattern

Joined: June 25th, 2000, 12:38 pm

February 19th, 2003, 5:58 pm #1

Hello Geoff,

Your site is by far the best I have ever seen, and, being an analytic, I enjoy your reasond explanations of "why". I thought I would send a note and ask for some help. Some background:

I am a 1 handicap and putting is one of my strengths. I use an arm and shoulder stroke with no wrist movement, left hand low. My putter is a "Positive Putter" from a company in the midwest... I've been using it consistently for 7 years... and is target line balanced. It looks a little like a standard hollowed out PING, but the shaft bends as it approaches the center of the head to attach closer to the heel. The sole is rounded so it doesn't have a staright level bottom like most putters.

Now, my problem. I am finding with impact tape that my contact point is a bit high on the face and the pattern is an elipse from just on the heel side of dead center to a bit high on the face toward the toe. The elipse is about 3/4 of an inch. Many of the putts feel "thin".... those high on the face. Very few feel like they are on the toe or heel side of the sweet spot. Those that are "dead on" feel and sound wonderful.... but I can't get there consistently enough.

I find that if I keep my upper arm connected to my chest I get more solid strikes, but even that is inconsistent. Direction is not an issue.... almost all putts are dead on line.

I guess I have 2 thoughts. 1. the "elipse" seems too long..... I'd like to get it to about 1/2 inch..... and 2. the shape should be more horizontal I assume, and in the center, not high on the face (that would make the putts more solid as opposed to feeling like a glancing strike).

I'd appreciate any of your thoughts.

Regards,

Ed


Phone (908)-953-7027
Cell (215)-353-6175
AMS Project Executive for AVAYA
Internet: EDZEBROW@US.IBM.COM
NOTES: Edward Zebrowski/Philadelphia/IBM
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Joined: June 25th, 2000, 12:38 pm

February 19th, 2003, 6:01 pm #2

Hi Ed!

Thanks for taking the time to contact me. Your issue is very interesting to me.

According to Werner & Grieg in their recent study of putting impacts, in their book noted below, the pro impact pattern is about 1/2 inch wide, a thin oval in shape, horizontal, and slightly below the midline of the face. In contrast, an amateur impact pattern is about 1 inch wide, a thin oval in shape, and slightly above the midline.

Frank D. Werner & Richard C. Grieg, How Golf Clubs Really Work and How to Optimize Their Designs (Jackson, WY: Origins, 2000).

As you describe it, I understand that your impact oval crosses from below or on the midline on the heel side to above the midline on the toe side of the sweetspot. This suggests that you have the heel elevated a little bit as the putter comes into impact. That bespeaks to me a slight lagging of the hands thru impact but also a slight lifting of the hands (very slight). In my experience, almost all golfers are unaware of this slight lifting of the hands. I suppose it is mostly a consequence of "accelerating" thru impact and a little handsiness in controlling the impact.

I am not the one to suggest that it doesn't take years to learn a truly "dead hands" stroke! Even so, dead hands and solid impact go together. The way I approach attaining dead hands is to "leave the hands down there" where I "hanged" them to death to begin with, most especially as the putter goes thru the impact area. Whether you think of the hands as heavy or encased in concrete or otherwise really doen't matter. Personally, I blame the elbows. The elbows are not especially wired for sensitive feedback from small crooking of the joint. With all that is drawing your attention in a putt, the elbows changing shape easily evades the radar. Practically any slight tightening of the biceps OR forearm muscles will put a little crook in the elbows. That's the same as lifting the putter thru impact. It only takes a 1/16th of an inch.

The pattern that I go for has two aspects: low putterhead thru the bottom of the stroke, leading to a very slight rising trajectory of the putterface into the back of the ball. The low putterhead is "just leaving the putter as low as it started" at address. The arc of the stroke should never get lower than the sole on the tops of the grass blades in the middle of the stroke, or the bottom of the arc, in the middle of the stance. On either side of this bottom, the putter's sole is rising in a slight arc. So, coming forward in the downstroke, leave the putter sole low so it matches the position at the bottom of the stroke (grazes the tops of the blades), and then the putter will be rising slightly into the back of the ball. This way, you impact the ball slightly BELOW the midline on the face.

As a matter of setup, you have to be aware of the middle of the stance and the bottom of the stroke, and have a ball position about 2 inches forward of this bottom. Then, in your routine, set the putterhead down not behind the ball but right in the middle of the stance, so that you can set the height of the pivot of your stroke (in the clavicle area) with the sole not pressed into the dirt but resting on the blade tips. This is the point in the stroke where the putter must again be low and square, before it can rise into the back of the ball.

Try this drill. Push a tee into the green nice and low so the top of the peg is lower than the tips of the grass (about 1/16th inch sticking above the dirt). Make this the bottom of your stroke and the middle of the stance. Practice setting up on top of this peg and then making strokes that almost touch the peg, but in fact skim just above it. Try to do this with the pivot staying at perfectly the same height. Then put a ball on the tee, and treat the putt like an iron shot. Putt a few balls off the tee. Then adjust your setup so the tee is 2 inches ahead of the middle of your stance. Putt balls off the tee while reaching bottom at the new middle or bottom point. You should be experiencing low hands (simply by not lifting via elbow crooking) and an impact low on the face as the putter rolls the ball with a rising blow.

Let me know how this works for you.

--
Cheers!

Geoff Mangum
Putting Theorist and Instructor

The PuttingZone.com
http://puttingzone.com
The Future of Putting Now -
Golf's most advanced and comprehensive putting instruction.
Over 35,000 page visits each month and growing strong...

518 Woodlawn Ave
Greensboro NC USA 27401
336.230.0612 home
336.402.1602 cell

geoff@puttingzone.com

Join the PZ for the free Newsletter, Tips, and Updates: just send me an email with "yes" or "ok" or "subscribe" or "sure" etc. in the subject or body and I'll add you. Or, go here: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PuttingZone/join



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Joined: June 25th, 2000, 12:38 pm

March 4th, 2003, 3:25 am #3

Hi Geoff, thank you for taking the time to provide your insight into my question. I read your response several times and found that I got a much better understanding of what could be happening with my stroke. I experimented with several "feels" and I was having difficulty getting consistent. However, I have finally found out what was happening in my
stroke.

I was not having a problem with keeping the face square through impact and I remain very accurate in terms of direction. What I tend to do is actually extend my arms toward the target in my stroke. Very slightly, but still there is a separation from the connection with the shoulders because I am allowing the arms to "swing" toward the target. This swinging is causing the larger contact dispersion than what I want. Also, I was setting up with the heel of my putter higher than the toe...... I mentioned earlier that the sole of my putter is rounded so I need to feel the face level.

My wrists are not breaking down, but my whole left and right arm are extending to the target..... I guess not the worst mistake you could make.... but still it introduced variability. I have been working on keeping the relationship of my arms constant with my shoulders and the results are very good so far. The impact pattern is now much better. Most of the marks are within 1/4 inch with some outliers toward the toe to 3/8ths or 1/2 inch. I must admit that this is practicing in my den.... unfortunately Mother Nature is not cooperating in the Philadelphia area..... but now I know what I need to do to get more consistent striking of putts on the sweet spot.

I suspect that the same move is what may be causing my tendency to hit full shots with my irons thin...... can't wait for the weather to break so I can experiment with that as well.

I really appreciate your help. If you are interested, I'd be happy to explain what feelings I am using to get the desired results. But I assume you already know. Thanks again Geoff.

p.s. I picked up a copy of "The Mental Art of Putting" when I saw your recommendation on the jacket cover. OK, I'll come clean... I probably would have bought it anyway, but your recommendation helped.

Regards, Ed


Phone (908)-953-7027
Cell (215)-353-6175
AMS Project Executive for AVAYA
Internet: EDZEBROW@US.IBM.COM
NOTES: Edward Zebrowski/Philadelphia/IBM
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: June 25th, 2000, 12:38 pm

March 4th, 2003, 3:25 am #4

Hi Ed!

Thanks for taking the time to contact me. Your issue is very interesting to me.

According to Werner & Grieg in their recent study of putting impacts, in their book noted below, the pro impact pattern is about 1/2 inch wide, a thin oval in shape, horizontal, and slightly below the midline of the face. In contrast, an amateur impact pattern is about 1 inch wide, a thin oval in shape, and slightly above the midline.

Frank D. Werner & Richard C. Grieg, How Golf Clubs Really Work and How to Optimize Their Designs (Jackson, WY: Origins, 2000).

As you describe it, I understand that your impact oval crosses from below or on the midline on the heel side to above the midline on the toe side of the sweetspot. This suggests that you have the heel elevated a little bit as the putter comes into impact. That bespeaks to me a slight lagging of the hands thru impact but also a slight lifting of the hands (very slight). In my experience, almost all golfers are unaware of this slight lifting of the hands. I suppose it is mostly a consequence of "accelerating" thru impact and a little handsiness in controlling the impact.

I am not the one to suggest that it doesn't take years to learn a truly "dead hands" stroke! Even so, dead hands and solid impact go together. The way I approach attaining dead hands is to "leave the hands down there" where I "hanged" them to death to begin with, most especially as the putter goes thru the impact area. Whether you think of the hands as heavy or encased in concrete or otherwise really doen't matter. Personally, I blame the elbows. The elbows are not especially wired for sensitive feedback from small crooking of the joint. With all that is drawing your attention in a putt, the elbows changing shape easily evades the radar. Practically any slight tightening of the biceps OR forearm muscles will put a little crook in the elbows. That's the same as lifting the putter thru impact. It only takes a 1/16th of an inch.

The pattern that I go for has two aspects: low putterhead thru the bottom of the stroke, leading to a very slight rising trajectory of the putterface into the back of the ball. The low putterhead is "just leaving the putter as low as it started" at address. The arc of the stroke should never get lower than the sole on the tops of the grass blades in the middle of the stroke, or the bottom of the arc, in the middle of the stance. On either side of this bottom, the putter's sole is rising in a slight arc. So, coming forward in the downstroke, leave the putter sole low so it matches the position at the bottom of the stroke (grazes the tops of the blades), and then the putter will be rising slightly into the back of the ball. This way, you impact the ball slightly BELOW the midline on the face.

As a matter of setup, you have to be aware of the middle of the stance and the bottom of the stroke, and have a ball position about 2 inches forward of this bottom. Then, in your routine, set the putterhead down not behind the ball but right in the middle of the stance, so that you can set the height of the pivot of your stroke (in the clavicle area) with the sole not pressed into the dirt but resting on the blade tips. This is the point in the stroke where the putter must again be low and square, before it can rise into the back of the ball.

Try this drill. Push a tee into the green nice and low so the top of the peg is lower than the tips of the grass (about 1/16th inch sticking above the dirt). Make this the bottom of your stroke and the middle of the stance. Practice setting up on top of this peg and then making strokes that almost touch the peg, but in fact skim just above it. Try to do this with the pivot staying at perfectly the same height. Then put a ball on the tee, and treat the putt like an iron shot. Putt a few balls off the tee. Then adjust your setup so the tee is 2 inches ahead of the middle of your stance. Putt balls off the tee while reaching bottom at the new middle or bottom point. You should be experiencing low hands (simply by not lifting via elbow crooking) and an impact low on the face as the putter rolls the ball with a rising blow.

Let me know how this works for you.

--
Cheers!

Geoff Mangum
Putting Theorist and Instructor

The PuttingZone.com
http://puttingzone.com
The Future of Putting Now -
Golf's most advanced and comprehensive putting instruction.
Over 35,000 page visits each month and growing strong...

518 Woodlawn Ave
Greensboro NC USA 27401
336.230.0612 home
336.402.1602 cell

geoff@puttingzone.com

Join the PZ for the free Newsletter, Tips, and Updates: just send me an email with "yes" or "ok" or "subscribe" or "sure" etc. in the subject or body and I'll add you. Or, go here: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PuttingZone/join


Hi Geoff, thank you for taking the time to provide your insight into my question. I read your response several times and found that I got a much better understanding of what could be happening with my stroke. I experimented with several "feels" and I was having difficulty getting consistent. However, I have finally found out what was happening in my
stroke.

I was not having a problem with keeping the face square through impact and I remain very accurate in terms of direction. What I tend to do is actually extend my arms toward the target in my stroke. Very slightly, but still there is a separation from the connection with the shoulders because I am allowing the arms to "swing" toward the target. This swinging is causing the larger contact dispersion than what I want. Also, I was setting up with the heel of my putter higher than the toe...... I mentioned earlier that the sole of my putter is rounded so I need to feel the face level.

My wrists are not breaking down, but my whole left and right arm are extending to the target..... I guess not the worst mistake you could make.... but still it introduced variability. I have been working on keeping the relationship of my arms constant with my shoulders and the results are very good so far. The impact pattern is now much better. Most of the marks are within 1/4 inch with some outliers toward the toe to 3/8ths or 1/2 inch. I must admit that this is practicing in my den.... unfortunately Mother Nature is not cooperating in the Philadelphia area..... but now I know what I need to do to get more consistent striking of putts on the sweet spot.

I suspect that the same move is what may be causing my tendency to hit full shots with my irons thin...... can't wait for the weather to break so I can experiment with that as well.

I really appreciate your help. If you are interested, I'd be happy to explain what feelings I am using to get the desired results. But I assume you already know. Thanks again Geoff.

p.s. I picked up a copy of "The Mental Art of Putting" when I saw your recommendation on the jacket cover. OK, I'll come clean... I probably would have bought it anyway, but your recommendation helped.

Regards, Ed


Phone (908)-953-7027
Cell (215)-353-6175
AMS Project Executive for AVAYA
Internet: EDZEBROW@US.IBM.COM
NOTES: Edward Zebrowski/Philadelphia/IBM
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: June 25th, 2000, 12:38 pm

March 4th, 2003, 3:25 am #5

Hi Ed!

Thanks for taking the time to contact me. Your issue is very interesting to me.

According to Werner & Grieg in their recent study of putting impacts, in their book noted below, the pro impact pattern is about 1/2 inch wide, a thin oval in shape, horizontal, and slightly below the midline of the face. In contrast, an amateur impact pattern is about 1 inch wide, a thin oval in shape, and slightly above the midline.

Frank D. Werner & Richard C. Grieg, How Golf Clubs Really Work and How to Optimize Their Designs (Jackson, WY: Origins, 2000).

As you describe it, I understand that your impact oval crosses from below or on the midline on the heel side to above the midline on the toe side of the sweetspot. This suggests that you have the heel elevated a little bit as the putter comes into impact. That bespeaks to me a slight lagging of the hands thru impact but also a slight lifting of the hands (very slight). In my experience, almost all golfers are unaware of this slight lifting of the hands. I suppose it is mostly a consequence of "accelerating" thru impact and a little handsiness in controlling the impact.

I am not the one to suggest that it doesn't take years to learn a truly "dead hands" stroke! Even so, dead hands and solid impact go together. The way I approach attaining dead hands is to "leave the hands down there" where I "hanged" them to death to begin with, most especially as the putter goes thru the impact area. Whether you think of the hands as heavy or encased in concrete or otherwise really doen't matter. Personally, I blame the elbows. The elbows are not especially wired for sensitive feedback from small crooking of the joint. With all that is drawing your attention in a putt, the elbows changing shape easily evades the radar. Practically any slight tightening of the biceps OR forearm muscles will put a little crook in the elbows. That's the same as lifting the putter thru impact. It only takes a 1/16th of an inch.

The pattern that I go for has two aspects: low putterhead thru the bottom of the stroke, leading to a very slight rising trajectory of the putterface into the back of the ball. The low putterhead is "just leaving the putter as low as it started" at address. The arc of the stroke should never get lower than the sole on the tops of the grass blades in the middle of the stroke, or the bottom of the arc, in the middle of the stance. On either side of this bottom, the putter's sole is rising in a slight arc. So, coming forward in the downstroke, leave the putter sole low so it matches the position at the bottom of the stroke (grazes the tops of the blades), and then the putter will be rising slightly into the back of the ball. This way, you impact the ball slightly BELOW the midline on the face.

As a matter of setup, you have to be aware of the middle of the stance and the bottom of the stroke, and have a ball position about 2 inches forward of this bottom. Then, in your routine, set the putterhead down not behind the ball but right in the middle of the stance, so that you can set the height of the pivot of your stroke (in the clavicle area) with the sole not pressed into the dirt but resting on the blade tips. This is the point in the stroke where the putter must again be low and square, before it can rise into the back of the ball.

Try this drill. Push a tee into the green nice and low so the top of the peg is lower than the tips of the grass (about 1/16th inch sticking above the dirt). Make this the bottom of your stroke and the middle of the stance. Practice setting up on top of this peg and then making strokes that almost touch the peg, but in fact skim just above it. Try to do this with the pivot staying at perfectly the same height. Then put a ball on the tee, and treat the putt like an iron shot. Putt a few balls off the tee. Then adjust your setup so the tee is 2 inches ahead of the middle of your stance. Putt balls off the tee while reaching bottom at the new middle or bottom point. You should be experiencing low hands (simply by not lifting via elbow crooking) and an impact low on the face as the putter rolls the ball with a rising blow.

Let me know how this works for you.

--
Cheers!

Geoff Mangum
Putting Theorist and Instructor

The PuttingZone.com
http://puttingzone.com
The Future of Putting Now -
Golf's most advanced and comprehensive putting instruction.
Over 35,000 page visits each month and growing strong...

518 Woodlawn Ave
Greensboro NC USA 27401
336.230.0612 home
336.402.1602 cell

geoff@puttingzone.com

Join the PZ for the free Newsletter, Tips, and Updates: just send me an email with "yes" or "ok" or "subscribe" or "sure" etc. in the subject or body and I'll add you. Or, go here: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PuttingZone/join


Hi Geoff, thank you for taking the time to provide your insight into my question. I read your response several times and found that I got a much better understanding of what could be happening with my stroke. I experimented with several "feels" and I was having difficulty getting consistent. However, I have finally found out what was happening in my
stroke.

I was not having a problem with keeping the face square through impact and I remain very accurate in terms of direction. What I tend to do is actually extend my arms toward the target in my stroke. Very slightly, but still there is a separation from the connection with the shoulders because I am allowing the arms to "swing" toward the target. This swinging is causing the larger contact dispersion than what I want. Also, I was setting up with the heel of my putter higher than the toe...... I mentioned earlier that the sole of my putter is rounded so I need to feel the face level.

My wrists are not breaking down, but my whole left and right arm are extending to the target..... I guess not the worst mistake you could make.... but still it introduced variability. I have been working on keeping the relationship of my arms constant with my shoulders and the results are very good so far. The impact pattern is now much better. Most of the marks are within 1/4 inch with some outliers toward the toe to 3/8ths or 1/2 inch. I must admit that this is practicing in my den.... unfortunately Mother Nature is not cooperating in the Philadelphia area..... but now I know what I need to do to get more consistent striking of putts on the sweet spot.

I suspect that the same move is what may be causing my tendency to hit full shots with my irons thin...... can't wait for the weather to break so I can experiment with that as well.

I really appreciate your help. If you are interested, I'd be happy to explain what feelings I am using to get the desired results. But I assume you already know. Thanks again Geoff.

p.s. I picked up a copy of "The Mental Art of Putting" when I saw your recommendation on the jacket cover. OK, I'll come clean... I probably would have bought it anyway, but your recommendation helped.

Regards, Ed


Phone (908)-953-7027
Cell (215)-353-6175
AMS Project Executive for AVAYA
Internet: EDZEBROW@US.IBM.COM
NOTES: Edward Zebrowski/Philadelphia/IBM
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: June 25th, 2000, 12:38 pm

March 4th, 2003, 3:26 am #6

Hi Ed!

Thanks for taking the time to contact me. Your issue is very interesting to me.

According to Werner & Grieg in their recent study of putting impacts, in their book noted below, the pro impact pattern is about 1/2 inch wide, a thin oval in shape, horizontal, and slightly below the midline of the face. In contrast, an amateur impact pattern is about 1 inch wide, a thin oval in shape, and slightly above the midline.

Frank D. Werner & Richard C. Grieg, How Golf Clubs Really Work and How to Optimize Their Designs (Jackson, WY: Origins, 2000).

As you describe it, I understand that your impact oval crosses from below or on the midline on the heel side to above the midline on the toe side of the sweetspot. This suggests that you have the heel elevated a little bit as the putter comes into impact. That bespeaks to me a slight lagging of the hands thru impact but also a slight lifting of the hands (very slight). In my experience, almost all golfers are unaware of this slight lifting of the hands. I suppose it is mostly a consequence of "accelerating" thru impact and a little handsiness in controlling the impact.

I am not the one to suggest that it doesn't take years to learn a truly "dead hands" stroke! Even so, dead hands and solid impact go together. The way I approach attaining dead hands is to "leave the hands down there" where I "hanged" them to death to begin with, most especially as the putter goes thru the impact area. Whether you think of the hands as heavy or encased in concrete or otherwise really doen't matter. Personally, I blame the elbows. The elbows are not especially wired for sensitive feedback from small crooking of the joint. With all that is drawing your attention in a putt, the elbows changing shape easily evades the radar. Practically any slight tightening of the biceps OR forearm muscles will put a little crook in the elbows. That's the same as lifting the putter thru impact. It only takes a 1/16th of an inch.

The pattern that I go for has two aspects: low putterhead thru the bottom of the stroke, leading to a very slight rising trajectory of the putterface into the back of the ball. The low putterhead is "just leaving the putter as low as it started" at address. The arc of the stroke should never get lower than the sole on the tops of the grass blades in the middle of the stroke, or the bottom of the arc, in the middle of the stance. On either side of this bottom, the putter's sole is rising in a slight arc. So, coming forward in the downstroke, leave the putter sole low so it matches the position at the bottom of the stroke (grazes the tops of the blades), and then the putter will be rising slightly into the back of the ball. This way, you impact the ball slightly BELOW the midline on the face.

As a matter of setup, you have to be aware of the middle of the stance and the bottom of the stroke, and have a ball position about 2 inches forward of this bottom. Then, in your routine, set the putterhead down not behind the ball but right in the middle of the stance, so that you can set the height of the pivot of your stroke (in the clavicle area) with the sole not pressed into the dirt but resting on the blade tips. This is the point in the stroke where the putter must again be low and square, before it can rise into the back of the ball.

Try this drill. Push a tee into the green nice and low so the top of the peg is lower than the tips of the grass (about 1/16th inch sticking above the dirt). Make this the bottom of your stroke and the middle of the stance. Practice setting up on top of this peg and then making strokes that almost touch the peg, but in fact skim just above it. Try to do this with the pivot staying at perfectly the same height. Then put a ball on the tee, and treat the putt like an iron shot. Putt a few balls off the tee. Then adjust your setup so the tee is 2 inches ahead of the middle of your stance. Putt balls off the tee while reaching bottom at the new middle or bottom point. You should be experiencing low hands (simply by not lifting via elbow crooking) and an impact low on the face as the putter rolls the ball with a rising blow.

Let me know how this works for you.

--
Cheers!

Geoff Mangum
Putting Theorist and Instructor

The PuttingZone.com
http://puttingzone.com
The Future of Putting Now -
Golf's most advanced and comprehensive putting instruction.
Over 35,000 page visits each month and growing strong...

518 Woodlawn Ave
Greensboro NC USA 27401
336.230.0612 home
336.402.1602 cell

geoff@puttingzone.com

Join the PZ for the free Newsletter, Tips, and Updates: just send me an email with "yes" or "ok" or "subscribe" or "sure" etc. in the subject or body and I'll add you. Or, go here: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PuttingZone/join


Hi Geoff, thank you for taking the time to provide your insight into my question. I read your response several times and found that I got a much better understanding of what could be happening with my stroke. I experimented with several "feels" and I was having difficulty getting consistent. However, I have finally found out what was happening in my
stroke.

I was not having a problem with keeping the face square through impact and I remain very accurate in terms of direction. What I tend to do is actually extend my arms toward the target in my stroke. Very slightly, but still there is a separation from the connection with the shoulders because I am allowing the arms to "swing" toward the target. This swinging is causing the larger contact dispersion than what I want. Also, I was setting up with the heel of my putter higher than the toe...... I mentioned earlier that the sole of my putter is rounded so I need to feel the face level.

My wrists are not breaking down, but my whole left and right arm are extending to the target..... I guess not the worst mistake you could make.... but still it introduced variability. I have been working on keeping the relationship of my arms constant with my shoulders and the results are very good so far. The impact pattern is now much better. Most of the marks are within 1/4 inch with some outliers toward the toe to 3/8ths or 1/2 inch. I must admit that this is practicing in my den.... unfortunately Mother Nature is not cooperating in the Philadelphia area..... but now I know what I need to do to get more consistent striking of putts on the sweet spot.

I suspect that the same move is what may be causing my tendency to hit full shots with my irons thin...... can't wait for the weather to break so I can experiment with that as well.

I really appreciate your help. If you are interested, I'd be happy to explain what feelings I am using to get the desired results. But I assume you already know. Thanks again Geoff.

p.s. I picked up a copy of "The Mental Art of Putting" when I saw your recommendation on the jacket cover. OK, I'll come clean... I probably would have bought it anyway, but your recommendation helped.

Regards, Ed


Phone (908)-953-7027
Cell (215)-353-6175
AMS Project Executive for AVAYA
Internet: EDZEBROW@US.IBM.COM
NOTES: Edward Zebrowski/Philadelphia/IBM
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: June 25th, 2000, 12:38 pm

March 4th, 2003, 3:28 am #7

Dear Ed,

Darn right I want to hear about the feelings you are relying on!

--
Cheers!

Geoff Mangum
Putting Theorist and Instructor

The PuttingZone.com
http://puttingzone.com
The Future of Putting Now -
Golf's most advanced and comprehensive putting instruction.
Over 35,000 page visits each month and growing strong...

518 Woodlawn Ave
Greensboro NC USA 27401
336.230.0612 home
336.402.1602 cell

geoff@puttingzone.com

Join the PZ for the free Newsletter, Tips, and Updates: just send me an email with "yes" or "ok" or "subscribe" or "sure" etc. in the subject or body and I'll add you. Or, go here: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PuttingZone/join
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Like
Share

Joined: June 25th, 2000, 12:38 pm

March 4th, 2003, 3:31 am #8

Geoff, I wanted to make sure that my "feel" still worked day after
day........ and it does.

First, I go thru the setup to insure that the putter, when allowed to seek
it's own position behind the ball by gravity is correctly positioned with
the sweet spot directly behind the center of the ball (approximately 2
inches behind the ball). Left arm straight and I feel it stretched to it's limit..... no bend in the
elbow...... The right elbow is "in line" with the left elbow (it's bent because of the
left hand low grip and allowing the left arm to hang straight down from the
shoulder socket).

Here's the first feel key.......... I feel both hands on the grip, and
focus on the upper part of the palms (toward the wrist) and their pressure
on the grip throughout the stroke. For me, the right hand is especially
important because when I feel that part of the palm with constant pressure
throughout the stroke.... the right shoulder follows the stroke instead of
stopping and allowing the upper arms to swing through.

The second key is the transition from backstroke to thrustroke. The key is
to allow the club to feel as though it has come to a complete stop and
letting gravity initiate the through swing. This can be difficult because
it gives me more "time" to think about the stroke and let my "analytical
brain" get in the way...... a mantra seems to help. I was rushing the
throughswing a bit and I believe this was causing the muscles to contract,
slightly, and affecting the forward path.

Interestingly, I was watching the Tiger Woods, David Toms match on Sunday
and it's David Tom's tempo that is a good example of what I want to
achieve. His transition is very smooth and consistant. Tiger's, by the
way, is more like my "normal" transition. I am very accurate on direction
but the contact point on the face is inconsistant. That's what I'm trying
to improve.

I know it is going to take up to a month to "groove" the new motion, but I
am able to repeat it more and more every day. I can see more and more
putts getting closer to the sweet spot with every session, so I know it is
working.

There is one other thing that I do that helps me. After I set up, I rotate
my shoulder so the club face opens and closes..... the hands and arms keep
their relationship to the shoulders.... this insures that the shoulders are
aligned properly as I "zero in on the target". I find that the minute
adjustments necessary to get the proper aim, work better this way, rather
than the tendency to manipulate the hands for the "fine tuning". Somehow
I built this into my routine, and I believe it is a key reason that I can
almost always hit putts on line and find it easy to keep the hands still.

Maybe more than you wanted to know, but that's what I'm doing. Thanks
again for your help.


Regards, Ed


Phone (908)-953-7027
Cell (215)-353-6175
AMS Project Executive for AVAYA
Internet: EDZEBROW@US.IBM.COM
NOTES: Edward Zebrowski/Philadelphia/IBM
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