The Iceman

The Iceman

Joined: August 15th, 2005, 5:07 pm

October 4th, 2006, 10:35 pm #1


In 1951 during the summer I was a helper delivering ice in the Elbow and Uptown with Bonnie Loup. He was a New Orleans Fireman and on his days off he delivered ice. We picked up 300 pound slabs from the ice house at Oleander, just off Carrollton Avenue.

We chopped those slabs into 25 and 50 pound blocks and used newspapers to carry the ice on our shoulders into people's homes.

We started around three in the morning and just walked into people's kitchens to drop 25, or 50 pound blocks of ice in their iceboxes. They left their back doors open for us.

Sometimes if they hadn't gotten ice for a few days the smell coming out of those iceboxes would take your breath away.

When I read about the abandoned fridges after Katrina, because of the spoiled food I could smell them all the way out here in California just from memory.

Bonnie Loup paid me $21 every Saturday and I had to pay my mother $20 for room and board every payday. I had just started smoking and could not buy cigerettes, so I would smoke Bonnie's Lucky Strikes that he left on the seat of the truck, without asking him if I could.He was a chain smoker and kept five packs on the seat always.

After a few days of this Bonnie put five packs of Picayunes on the seat instead of the usual Lucky Strikes. I smoked one and it felt like a hemp knot going down my throat and choked me up pretty good. You might could say Bonnie broke me from sucking eggs that day.

He asked why I didn't buy my own smokes and I told him my mother took most of my pay. He fired me ands said, "Tell your maw if she wants $20 a week for her to come deliver ice!".

After that I started delivering milk for Roemers Dairy!


George Martin
Pacifica, CA
http://home.earthlink.net/~bat20/
Last edited by Slyoldawg on October 4th, 2006, 11:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 18th, 2005, 1:12 am

October 4th, 2006, 11:37 pm #2

Kids today would not believe that tale! People in general have forgotten how to do whatever it takes to accomplish your goals. Thanks for reminding me.
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Joined: August 8th, 2003, 11:59 pm

October 5th, 2006, 4:21 am #3

In 1951 during the summer I was a helper delivering ice in the Elbow and Uptown with Bonnie Loup. He was a New Orleans Fireman and on his days off he delivered ice. We picked up 300 pound slabs from the ice house at Oleander, just off Carrollton Avenue.

We chopped those slabs into 25 and 50 pound blocks and used newspapers to carry the ice on our shoulders into people's homes.

We started around three in the morning and just walked into people's kitchens to drop 25, or 50 pound blocks of ice in their iceboxes. They left their back doors open for us.

Sometimes if they hadn't gotten ice for a few days the smell coming out of those iceboxes would take your breath away.

When I read about the abandoned fridges after Katrina, because of the spoiled food I could smell them all the way out here in California just from memory.

Bonnie Loup paid me $21 every Saturday and I had to pay my mother $20 for room and board every payday. I had just started smoking and could not buy cigerettes, so I would smoke Bonnie's Lucky Strikes that he left on the seat of the truck, without asking him if I could.He was a chain smoker and kept five packs on the seat always.

After a few days of this Bonnie put five packs of Picayunes on the seat instead of the usual Lucky Strikes. I smoked one and it felt like a hemp knot going down my throat and choked me up pretty good. You might could say Bonnie broke me from sucking eggs that day.

He asked why I didn't buy my own smokes and I told him my mother took most of my pay. He fired me ands said, "Tell your maw if she wants $20 a week for her to come deliver ice!".

After that I started delivering milk for Roemers Dairy!


George Martin
Pacifica, CA
http://home.earthlink.net/~bat20/
I never got a job until I was almost 18 and already out of high school. If I worked, Pops expected me to hand over a big chunk of my measly pay. Why mess up my school vacation? I just sat home and did whatever I wanted to do.

(Is it true that the Iceman had his pick?)





*******************************************
"Once in a while I say, 'go for it' and I eat chocolate."
-Claudia Schiffer-
Last edited by ersatzrat on October 5th, 2006, 4:22 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: August 23rd, 2003, 1:14 am

October 5th, 2006, 4:36 am #4

In 1951 during the summer I was a helper delivering ice in the Elbow and Uptown with Bonnie Loup. He was a New Orleans Fireman and on his days off he delivered ice. We picked up 300 pound slabs from the ice house at Oleander, just off Carrollton Avenue.

We chopped those slabs into 25 and 50 pound blocks and used newspapers to carry the ice on our shoulders into people's homes.

We started around three in the morning and just walked into people's kitchens to drop 25, or 50 pound blocks of ice in their iceboxes. They left their back doors open for us.

Sometimes if they hadn't gotten ice for a few days the smell coming out of those iceboxes would take your breath away.

When I read about the abandoned fridges after Katrina, because of the spoiled food I could smell them all the way out here in California just from memory.

Bonnie Loup paid me $21 every Saturday and I had to pay my mother $20 for room and board every payday. I had just started smoking and could not buy cigerettes, so I would smoke Bonnie's Lucky Strikes that he left on the seat of the truck, without asking him if I could.He was a chain smoker and kept five packs on the seat always.

After a few days of this Bonnie put five packs of Picayunes on the seat instead of the usual Lucky Strikes. I smoked one and it felt like a hemp knot going down my throat and choked me up pretty good. You might could say Bonnie broke me from sucking eggs that day.

He asked why I didn't buy my own smokes and I told him my mother took most of my pay. He fired me ands said, "Tell your maw if she wants $20 a week for her to come deliver ice!".

After that I started delivering milk for Roemers Dairy!


George Martin
Pacifica, CA
http://home.earthlink.net/~bat20/
If you had ever been to any of the Hayne Blvd. camps, you know that they sat out in the lake and had "walks" of various lengths (depending upon how far out the camp sat from the shore).  Some camps had long "runs"/"walks".  I remember Linus delivering ice out there from early childhood until I was an adult and he appeared not to age during all those years and never slowing down while carrying a fifty pound block on one shoulder and another in his hand on a giant tong.

I'm gonna guess that Linus worked out there until the mid to late 1970's.  Although all of the camps had refrigerators by then, we needed Linus to deliver ice for the ice chests and for the old grocery store type Coke coolers that were either no longer working (but served well if loaded with ice) or were so old that they were never "self contained".  We needed a lot of ice to keep the beer and soft drinks cold.


Mr. Lake
http://www.neworleanspast.com
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Joined: March 17th, 2006, 6:30 pm

October 5th, 2006, 10:40 am #5

In 1951 during the summer I was a helper delivering ice in the Elbow and Uptown with Bonnie Loup. He was a New Orleans Fireman and on his days off he delivered ice. We picked up 300 pound slabs from the ice house at Oleander, just off Carrollton Avenue.

We chopped those slabs into 25 and 50 pound blocks and used newspapers to carry the ice on our shoulders into people's homes.

We started around three in the morning and just walked into people's kitchens to drop 25, or 50 pound blocks of ice in their iceboxes. They left their back doors open for us.

Sometimes if they hadn't gotten ice for a few days the smell coming out of those iceboxes would take your breath away.

When I read about the abandoned fridges after Katrina, because of the spoiled food I could smell them all the way out here in California just from memory.

Bonnie Loup paid me $21 every Saturday and I had to pay my mother $20 for room and board every payday. I had just started smoking and could not buy cigerettes, so I would smoke Bonnie's Lucky Strikes that he left on the seat of the truck, without asking him if I could.He was a chain smoker and kept five packs on the seat always.

After a few days of this Bonnie put five packs of Picayunes on the seat instead of the usual Lucky Strikes. I smoked one and it felt like a hemp knot going down my throat and choked me up pretty good. You might could say Bonnie broke me from sucking eggs that day.

He asked why I didn't buy my own smokes and I told him my mother took most of my pay. He fired me ands said, "Tell your maw if she wants $20 a week for her to come deliver ice!".

After that I started delivering milk for Roemers Dairy!


George Martin
Pacifica, CA
http://home.earthlink.net/~bat20/
to our farm in Ky as we had no electric service but only on Sat! My gramma kept her butter and milk cool in a spring. The water was fresh and cold all the time. And watermelons went in there too! It is still there in front of the house!
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Joined: April 1st, 2006, 5:15 pm

October 5th, 2006, 1:42 pm #6

In 1951 during the summer I was a helper delivering ice in the Elbow and Uptown with Bonnie Loup. He was a New Orleans Fireman and on his days off he delivered ice. We picked up 300 pound slabs from the ice house at Oleander, just off Carrollton Avenue.

We chopped those slabs into 25 and 50 pound blocks and used newspapers to carry the ice on our shoulders into people's homes.

We started around three in the morning and just walked into people's kitchens to drop 25, or 50 pound blocks of ice in their iceboxes. They left their back doors open for us.

Sometimes if they hadn't gotten ice for a few days the smell coming out of those iceboxes would take your breath away.

When I read about the abandoned fridges after Katrina, because of the spoiled food I could smell them all the way out here in California just from memory.

Bonnie Loup paid me $21 every Saturday and I had to pay my mother $20 for room and board every payday. I had just started smoking and could not buy cigerettes, so I would smoke Bonnie's Lucky Strikes that he left on the seat of the truck, without asking him if I could.He was a chain smoker and kept five packs on the seat always.

After a few days of this Bonnie put five packs of Picayunes on the seat instead of the usual Lucky Strikes. I smoked one and it felt like a hemp knot going down my throat and choked me up pretty good. You might could say Bonnie broke me from sucking eggs that day.

He asked why I didn't buy my own smokes and I told him my mother took most of my pay. He fired me ands said, "Tell your maw if she wants $20 a week for her to come deliver ice!".

After that I started delivering milk for Roemers Dairy!


George Martin
Pacifica, CA
http://home.earthlink.net/~bat20/
on a regular route is now a footnote in history. Kids have no idea.

The ice delivery story was cherce.

I remembuh da milkman from Walker Roemer's bringing milk in gallon glass jugs wit da little paypuh pull tab on top, along wit' eggs, buttah, cream, halfanhalf, and stuff like dat, just leave a note fuh any changes to yuh regular awduh.

Also da bug man yoosta come inna house evry munt to spray, bucuz nodoby evuh locked dey doors, an' he had puhmission.

Dah drah cleanuhs yoosta have a regulah route, too.

Now da only tahm people come delivah is if you call fuh pizza!
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Mr. Lake
Mr. Lake

October 5th, 2006, 1:44 pm #7

Canseco's (on Metry Rd.) delivers.
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Joined: November 27th, 2005, 2:57 am

October 5th, 2006, 3:55 pm #8

an iceman named Charlie Mortillero who quit delivering ice to open an auto wrecking yard. He had three I think. One on Chef Hwy. which he closed and sold the land to Exxon, another on Old Gentilly Road for late model parts, and another on Old Gentilly with older cars. He told me once "When I delivered ice everyone called me 'ol Charlie, but now I made a fortune in these wrecked cars they call me Mr. Charlie." Really nice guy.
On home delivery I believe we still have weekly home delivery of ice cream. Can't recall the name of the company, but they have big yellow trucks, very heavy looking like they should be hauling batteries or something a lot heavier than ice cream.
Also didn't a local soft drink company still have home delivery? Big Shot maybe?
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Joined: August 15th, 2005, 5:07 pm

October 6th, 2006, 3:07 am #9

I never got a job until I was almost 18 and already out of high school. If I worked, Pops expected me to hand over a big chunk of my measly pay. Why mess up my school vacation? I just sat home and did whatever I wanted to do.

(Is it true that the Iceman had his pick?)





*******************************************
"Once in a while I say, 'go for it' and I eat chocolate."
-Claudia Schiffer-
I was only 15 at the time and had some offers come my way from customers. I told Bonnie about them and he always went and set those "women" straight, at least at the time, that is what I thought he did. <g>

George Martin
Pacifica, CA
http://home.earthlink.net/~bat20/
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Joined: August 15th, 2005, 5:07 pm

October 6th, 2006, 3:13 am #10

an iceman named Charlie Mortillero who quit delivering ice to open an auto wrecking yard. He had three I think. One on Chef Hwy. which he closed and sold the land to Exxon, another on Old Gentilly Road for late model parts, and another on Old Gentilly with older cars. He told me once "When I delivered ice everyone called me 'ol Charlie, but now I made a fortune in these wrecked cars they call me Mr. Charlie." Really nice guy.
On home delivery I believe we still have weekly home delivery of ice cream. Can't recall the name of the company, but they have big yellow trucks, very heavy looking like they should be hauling batteries or something a lot heavier than ice cream.
Also didn't a local soft drink company still have home delivery? Big Shot maybe?
We had a case of Wright Rootbeer delivered to our house on Fig Street in the early forties.

My brother, "Pudder" would load them into the icebox. One day he must have shook one too much, because it "exploded" as he put it down on the shelf in the icebox.

One of our many, many trips to Charity Hospital for stitches..


George Martin
Pacifica, CA
http://home.earthlink.net/~bat20/
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