Pumpkin soup repair needed

Pumpkin soup repair needed

Joined: August 8th, 2003, 2:05 pm

March 28th, 2008, 10:03 pm #1

OK, so I bought this pumpkin soup in a container - it's organic and all that crap - thought I'd try it. Hubby pronounced it almost tasteless. I have half a container left and would like to salvage it. Any recommendations as to a spice (or whatever) I could add to it to give it a flavor boost? (Cloves or nutmeg, maybe?)

LG

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"It's too late in the world for flags."
- The Sand Pebbles, 1966
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Joined: August 13th, 2003, 3:09 am

March 28th, 2008, 10:07 pm #2

It may need nothing else, maybe some freshly ground pepper (white peppercorns). If it still don't get it try some savory.

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Joined: January 5th, 2007, 12:04 am

March 28th, 2008, 10:08 pm #3

OK, so I bought this pumpkin soup in a container - it's organic and all that crap - thought I'd try it. Hubby pronounced it almost tasteless. I have half a container left and would like to salvage it. Any recommendations as to a spice (or whatever) I could add to it to give it a flavor boost? (Cloves or nutmeg, maybe?)

LG

_______________________________________
"It's too late in the world for flags."
- The Sand Pebbles, 1966
may take it to a more edible level. Definitely white pepper!

Whenever I utter the word "exercise" I will rinse my mouth with chocolate!
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Joined: August 8th, 2003, 2:05 pm

March 28th, 2008, 10:11 pm #4

I gotta ask - is there really any difference in flavor between black and white pepper?

LG

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"It's too late in the world for flags."
- The Sand Pebbles, 1966
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Joined: February 24th, 2008, 2:50 am

March 28th, 2008, 10:26 pm #5

OK, so I bought this pumpkin soup in a container - it's organic and all that crap - thought I'd try it. Hubby pronounced it almost tasteless. I have half a container left and would like to salvage it. Any recommendations as to a spice (or whatever) I could add to it to give it a flavor boost? (Cloves or nutmeg, maybe?)

LG

_______________________________________
"It's too late in the world for flags."
- The Sand Pebbles, 1966
a little bit of cream.  some orange zest.  SALT.  be careful with the nutmeg, a little goes a very long way.  Sage goes very nicely with pumpkin soup.  Add bits of things at a time, stir and taste.  Why don't you make some parmesan sage croutons to float in it?  Take chunks of bread, toss in a bowl with some oil, parmesan and sage, bake in the oven for about 20 minutes. 

A drizzle of sour cream is nice when it's in the bowl too.
Last edited by bdavid4 on March 28th, 2008, 10:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: August 13th, 2003, 3:09 am

March 28th, 2008, 10:32 pm #6

I gotta ask - is there really any difference in flavor between black and white pepper?

LG

_______________________________________
"It's too late in the world for flags."
- The Sand Pebbles, 1966
But when you tell someone that's what you used they are usually impressed! But, kidding aside, white pepper is really black peppercorns with the "skin" removed and is a bit milder and doesn't show up in your pun'kin' soup as "flecks".

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Joined: January 5th, 2007, 12:04 am

March 28th, 2008, 10:38 pm #7

a little bit of cream.  some orange zest.  SALT.  be careful with the nutmeg, a little goes a very long way.  Sage goes very nicely with pumpkin soup.  Add bits of things at a time, stir and taste.  Why don't you make some parmesan sage croutons to float in it?  Take chunks of bread, toss in a bowl with some oil, parmesan and sage, bake in the oven for about 20 minutes. 

A drizzle of sour cream is nice when it's in the bowl too.
Sound like some great "fixes."

Whenever I utter the word "exercise" I will rinse my mouth with chocolate!
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Joined: August 8th, 2003, 2:05 pm

March 28th, 2008, 11:31 pm #8

a little bit of cream.  some orange zest.  SALT.  be careful with the nutmeg, a little goes a very long way.  Sage goes very nicely with pumpkin soup.  Add bits of things at a time, stir and taste.  Why don't you make some parmesan sage croutons to float in it?  Take chunks of bread, toss in a bowl with some oil, parmesan and sage, bake in the oven for about 20 minutes. 

A drizzle of sour cream is nice when it's in the bowl too.
I had already tried pepper (black), a little salt and sour cream. We're in a rush tonight because we're going to a concert, so won't have time for the croutons - but I'll file away that idea!

LG

_______________________________________
"It's too late in the world for flags."
- The Sand Pebbles, 1966
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Joined: March 28th, 2005, 4:14 pm

March 29th, 2008, 4:12 am #9

a little bit of cream.  some orange zest.  SALT.  be careful with the nutmeg, a little goes a very long way.  Sage goes very nicely with pumpkin soup.  Add bits of things at a time, stir and taste.  Why don't you make some parmesan sage croutons to float in it?  Take chunks of bread, toss in a bowl with some oil, parmesan and sage, bake in the oven for about 20 minutes. 

A drizzle of sour cream is nice when it's in the bowl too.
I really like Barbara's ideas.

I keep poultry seasoning & cake spice, pumpkin pie spice, apple pie spice close by. I make butternut squash soup & use poultry seasoning & cake spice & one of the others. Wow, you'd be amazed at how good it is!

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Joined: August 23rd, 2003, 2:41 pm

March 29th, 2008, 4:25 am #10

OK, so I bought this pumpkin soup in a container - it's organic and all that crap - thought I'd try it. Hubby pronounced it almost tasteless. I have half a container left and would like to salvage it. Any recommendations as to a spice (or whatever) I could add to it to give it a flavor boost? (Cloves or nutmeg, maybe?)

LG

_______________________________________
"It's too late in the world for flags."
- The Sand Pebbles, 1966
But for squash - add nutmeg, ground pepper - and make sure the salt is properly adjusted.

Hmmmm - herbs for squash . . . I am thinking sage might be a subtle addition towards the end of cooking.

 
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