Lead in the Soil

Lead in the Soil

Joined: June 19th, 2007, 3:32 pm

April 12th, 2007, 5:46 am #1

This information was in the Southern Food and Beverage Museum newsletter and I thought you might find it interesting (it was new news to me):

Dr. Howard Mielke, now at the Tulane Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research in New Orleans, is one of the most experienced researchers on soil lead in the country. He has thoroughly mapped lead levels in the soil in New Orleans over many years and discovered dangerously high levels of lead in the soil, especially toward the center of the city He has shown that levels of lead in the soil correlate very closely with the amount of leaded gasoline burned in an area during the years when leaded gasoline was used. This supports the conclusion that the lead has been deposited in the soil from gasoline emissions, not just lead based paint. This problem is not limited to New Orleans, although it has been well studied there, but can be found in all urban areas.

The problem can be remediated economically by bringing in clean soil and spreading it 6 inches deep over the contaminated soil. If you are growing vegetables, it is important to grow them in clean soil as deep as the roots of the plants. For more information about soil lead, having you soil tested or remediated please contact. recover.neworleans@yahoo.com

Mr. Lake

New Orleans Past
Mr. Lake's New Orleans Forums
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Joined: January 8th, 2005, 2:57 pm

April 12th, 2007, 10:53 am #2

Think of what it must be like in places like Los Angeles.  I'm glad I bought a few yards of clean dirt to bolster my garden.
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Joined: December 10th, 2004, 8:50 pm

April 12th, 2007, 9:04 pm #3

This information was in the Southern Food and Beverage Museum newsletter and I thought you might find it interesting (it was new news to me):

Dr. Howard Mielke, now at the Tulane Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research in New Orleans, is one of the most experienced researchers on soil lead in the country. He has thoroughly mapped lead levels in the soil in New Orleans over many years and discovered dangerously high levels of lead in the soil, especially toward the center of the city He has shown that levels of lead in the soil correlate very closely with the amount of leaded gasoline burned in an area during the years when leaded gasoline was used. This supports the conclusion that the lead has been deposited in the soil from gasoline emissions, not just lead based paint. This problem is not limited to New Orleans, although it has been well studied there, but can be found in all urban areas.

The problem can be remediated economically by bringing in clean soil and spreading it 6 inches deep over the contaminated soil. If you are growing vegetables, it is important to grow them in clean soil as deep as the roots of the plants. For more information about soil lead, having you soil tested or remediated please contact. recover.neworleans@yahoo.com

Mr. Lake

New Orleans Past
Mr. Lake's New Orleans Forums
If your soil has unacceptable concentrations of certain metal contaminants, you can use bioremediation techniques to clean up the problem over a few years. Sunflowers, aside from having spectacular blooms, concentrate large amounts of lead in their roots, so if you pull them up after the season, you're taking a lot of lead out of the soil with them (assuming that you don't compost and re-contaminate). Morning glories also have this property, but they tend to store the lead in the stems, making disposal all the easier. It's even safe to grow many vegetables in contaminated soils, provided that the part you eat is not the part where the metals accumulate. Tomatoes, for example, are safe since most of the lead stays in the roots. Leafy greens and radishes, on the other hand, concentrate the lead in the edible parts, so planting them would be ill-advised.
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Joined: November 27th, 2005, 2:57 am

April 13th, 2007, 11:46 pm #4

to think of what all is in the soil after the flood of '05. With all the thousands of flooded vehicles, engine oil, transmission fluid, gear grease, power steering fluid, brake fluid, coolant, diesel fuel, gasoline, etc.
Don't think I would plant a food garden without scraping off at least the top 6 inches and replacing the soil.
A lot of NOLa is built on landfills and who knows what was dumped years ago and floated up in the flood.
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Joined: April 1st, 2006, 5:15 pm

April 14th, 2007, 9:33 pm #5

This information was in the Southern Food and Beverage Museum newsletter and I thought you might find it interesting (it was new news to me):

Dr. Howard Mielke, now at the Tulane Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research in New Orleans, is one of the most experienced researchers on soil lead in the country. He has thoroughly mapped lead levels in the soil in New Orleans over many years and discovered dangerously high levels of lead in the soil, especially toward the center of the city He has shown that levels of lead in the soil correlate very closely with the amount of leaded gasoline burned in an area during the years when leaded gasoline was used. This supports the conclusion that the lead has been deposited in the soil from gasoline emissions, not just lead based paint. This problem is not limited to New Orleans, although it has been well studied there, but can be found in all urban areas.

The problem can be remediated economically by bringing in clean soil and spreading it 6 inches deep over the contaminated soil. If you are growing vegetables, it is important to grow them in clean soil as deep as the roots of the plants. For more information about soil lead, having you soil tested or remediated please contact. recover.neworleans@yahoo.com

Mr. Lake

New Orleans Past
Mr. Lake's New Orleans Forums
around the Comstock area of northern Nevada where we moved from. The ground water has lots of metals in it, some areas with lots of arsenic. Our well water was treated by a heavy metal filter, softener, and for the kitchen, reverse osmosis before use. The hose bibs and irrigation system, however, were between the well and the water treatment systems.

Down the road from Stagecoach (no kidding) where we lived, Fallon, home of the Navy's "Top Gun" school, suffers from a higher than normal rate of various cancers, and despite several studies, there seem to be no definitive scientific answers.

One thing is for sure. When the Comstock lode and surrounding areas around Virginia City and what is now Dayton were being mined, and the Sutro Tunnel was draining all the water into the Carson River Valley, a lot of the mercury used to refine the gold went straight into the environment. People around there are still paying the price, it seems.
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