I need some French Translations

I need some French Translations

Joined: August 23rd, 2003, 1:14 am

September 22nd, 2006, 4:46 am #1


"Sauvage matachez en Guerrier"

"Temple des Sauvages, Cabanne de Chef"

"Naturels en Ele'"
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<DIV><FONT size=3>"Desseins de Sauvages de Plusiers nations"</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=3></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=3>"Chasse generale du Chevre uil"</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=3></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=3>I need these for the frazzlin' book that's driving me crazy.&nbsp; I'd be glad to include the translator in the acknowledgments.</FONT></DIV>
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Mr. Lake
http://www.neworleanspast.com
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Joined: August 23rd, 2003, 1:14 am

September 22nd, 2006, 5:03 am #2

Please.&nbsp; I think I know this one but want to be sure.

Mr. Lake
http://www.neworleanspast.com
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Joined: August 13th, 2003, 3:09 am

September 22nd, 2006, 8:40 am #3

"Sauvage matachez en Guerrier"

"Temple des Sauvages, Cabanne de Chef"

"Naturels en Ele'"
<TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=2 border=0>
<TBODY>
<TR>
<TD width=592></TD></TR>
<TR>
<TD vAlign=top width=592><!--area Type="area_a" face="Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif" size="2" color="black" style="0" password_protection="full"-->
<FONT face=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif color=black size=2>
<DIV><FONT size=3>"Desseins de Sauvages de Plusiers nations"</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=3></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=3>"Chasse generale du Chevre uil"</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=3></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=3>I need these for the frazzlin' book that's driving me crazy.&nbsp; I'd be glad to include the translator in the acknowledgments.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV></FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

<FONT size=1></FONT>&nbsp;


Mr. Lake
http://www.neworleanspast.com
"Temple des Sauvages, Cabanne de Chef"
For whatever reason, the native American huts obsrved by early Mississippi Valley explorers were called "temples". The "Indians" were called Les Sauvages. We still have a stretch of Bayou Sauvage in New Orleans East extending from Paris Road out to Chef Menteur Pass. Cabanne de Chef means "Chief's House".

"Matachez en Guerrier" is a reference to "war paint".

"Naturels en Ele'" Don't have a clue....I mean that, I don't know what it means.

"Desseins de Sauvages de Plusiers nations" Plusiers means "several" or "many" the rest of the text means "drawings of" or "abstracts of" Indians....

"Chasse generale du Chevre uil" (Word should be joined: "chevreuil") a community effort to hem in and hunt down deer.

I didn't know any of this stuff off the top of my head. I hadda look a bunch of it up from the extensive CopCop Collection liberry strewn about my bedroom and bat'room.









.
Last edited by Cop_Cop on September 24th, 2006, 12:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: August 13th, 2003, 3:09 am

September 22nd, 2006, 8:43 am #4

Please.&nbsp; I think I know this one but want to be sure.

Mr. Lake
http://www.neworleanspast.com
Course (Map? Chart?) of the Mississippi in Louisiana

.
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Joined: August 13th, 2003, 3:09 am

September 22nd, 2006, 9:34 am #5

"Sauvage matachez en Guerrier"

"Temple des Sauvages, Cabanne de Chef"

"Naturels en Ele'"
<TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=2 border=0>
<TBODY>
<TR>
<TD width=592></TD></TR>
<TR>
<TD vAlign=top width=592><!--area Type="area_a" face="Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif" size="2" color="black" style="0" password_protection="full"-->
<FONT face=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif color=black size=2>
<DIV><FONT size=3>"Desseins de Sauvages de Plusiers nations"</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=3></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=3>"Chasse generale du Chevre uil"</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=3></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=3>I need these for the frazzlin' book that's driving me crazy.&nbsp; I'd be glad to include the translator in the acknowledgments.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV></FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

<FONT size=1></FONT>&nbsp;


Mr. Lake
http://www.neworleanspast.com
I have been totally fascinated with the exploration of Louisiana since Brother Jules drilled it into my head at St. Aloysius. Jean Baptiste LeMoyne (Sieur de Bienville) had already distinguished himself as a midshipman in the royal navy by the time he had reached his 18th birthday and accompanied his older brother, Pierre (d'Iberville), on their expedition to establish the colony of Louisiana. 18 freakin' years old! How these guys orchestrated their efforts is amazing. They learned local dialects, gained the trust of the native Americans and obtained from them shortcut routes to the area to be settled. They were shown one route from Ocean Springs, Mississippi, along the Gulf Coast and up through Lakes Borgne and Pontchartrain to where the Spillway is today. From there they portaged and canoed along Bayou Labranche to where New Sarpy is presently located to a place on the Mississippi River called L'Anse aux Butardes where they met Les Voyageurs, craftsmen, hunters, trappers and soldiers from Canada who were instrumental in getting our City started. They were also shown a route through Lake Pontchartrain to Lake Maurepas and Bayou Manchac that led to Baton Rouge, the dividing line between the territory of the Bayougoula and Houmas Indians and marked by a pole stained with the blood of fish and animals and called Istrouma (Red Stick). I could go on and on and on............I shoulda been there!

.
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Joined: August 8th, 2003, 2:05 pm

September 22nd, 2006, 2:47 pm #6

"Temple des Sauvages, Cabanne de Chef"
For whatever reason, the native American huts obsrved by early Mississippi Valley explorers were called "temples". The "Indians" were called Les Sauvages. We still have a stretch of Bayou Sauvage in New Orleans East extending from Paris Road out to Chef Menteur Pass. Cabanne de Chef means "Chief's House".

"Matachez en Guerrier" is a reference to "war paint".

"Naturels en Ele'" Don't have a clue....I mean that, I don't know what it means.

"Desseins de Sauvages de Plusiers nations" Plusiers means "several" or "many" the rest of the text means "drawings of" or "abstracts of" Indians....

"Chasse generale du Chevre uil" (Word should be joined: "chevreuil") a community effort to hem in and hunt down deer.

I didn't know any of this stuff off the top of my head. I hadda look a bunch of it up from the extensive CopCop Collection liberry strewn about my bedroom and bat'room.









.
CopCop is da man! Maybe we should call you Mr. N.O. Encyclopedia!

LG

_______________________________________
"It's too late in the world for flags."
- The Sand Pebbles, 1966
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Joined: March 17th, 2006, 6:30 pm

September 23rd, 2006, 12:51 pm #7

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Joined: August 8th, 2003, 2:05 pm

September 24th, 2006, 5:50 am #8

I have been totally fascinated with the exploration of Louisiana since Brother Jules drilled it into my head at St. Aloysius. Jean Baptiste LeMoyne (Sieur de Bienville) had already distinguished himself as a midshipman in the royal navy by the time he had reached his 18th birthday and accompanied his older brother, Pierre (d'Iberville), on their expedition to establish the colony of Louisiana. 18 freakin' years old! How these guys orchestrated their efforts is amazing. They learned local dialects, gained the trust of the native Americans and obtained from them shortcut routes to the area to be settled. They were shown one route from Ocean Springs, Mississippi, along the Gulf Coast and up through Lakes Borgne and Pontchartrain to where the Spillway is today. From there they portaged and canoed along Bayou Labranche to where New Sarpy is presently located to a place on the Mississippi River called L'Anse aux Butardes where they met Les Voyageurs, craftsmen, hunters, trappers and soldiers from Canada who were instrumental in getting our City started. They were also shown a route through Lake Pontchartrain to Lake Maurepas and Bayou Manchac that led to Baton Rouge, the dividing line between the territory of the Bayougoula and Houmas Indians and marked by a pole stained with the blood of fish and animals and called Istrouma (Red Stick). I could go on and on and on............I shoulda been there!

.
I asked my brother if he remembered Brother Jules. Here's his answer:

"I had Brother Jules in either my sophomore or junior year for History. Unfortunately, I don't remember much except he was a likeable sort. It wasn't his fault, I was probably day dreaming most of the time. What I remember most was what the class gave him for Christmas. Brother Jules was bald up the middle with hair on both sides. Everyone in the class bought a five cent comb and broke the middle tines out leaving the sides. These were put in a large cardboard box and gift wrapped. He was a good sport about it."
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Joined: August 13th, 2003, 3:09 am

September 24th, 2006, 5:59 am #9

Here's some information about Bro. Jules

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Joined: August 8th, 2003, 2:05 pm

September 24th, 2006, 6:02 am #10

I'll pass this along to my brother.
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