"You Were a Lot Healthier Before You quit Smoking!"

dvv
Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 23:26

25 Jun 2003, 07:30 #41

Linda--I have to tell you how much your post on the visit to the lung doctor and those today about health issues which surface after quitting have meant to me. I am having such trouble breathing [started before I quit]; my primary care doc said it's post nasal drip...had a chest xray and it was clear. Because of your posts, I'm going to seek out a pulmonologist...keep your fingers crossed. I've been quit for 27 days, 18 hours, 1 minute (28 days).
I've not smoked 1110 death sticks, and saved $194.48.
I've saved 3 days, 20 hours, 30 minutes of my life.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

03 Sep 2003, 06:11 #42

From: Joel Sent: 6/24/2003 2:24 PM
This post brings up such an important point to work with your health care providers in the event that something seems wrong after quitting. For some people things may just happen at some point in time after quitting that were going to happen whether they had quit smoking or not. In a few other people, conditions that may have actually existed when they were smoking and were being masked may now present noticeable symptoms for the first time .

Either way, there are likely treatments available for these conditions if they just get properly diagnosed. What it so ironic is how a people can be afraid to go to a doctor for risk that he or she may prescribe a medication for a problem that smoking was "treating" and now the patient is afraid of the side effects of the new medication.

Well in the case of the bronchodialators you had said you found out were in cigarettes, the prescribed medication may be the same as ones found in smoke, but now not being accompanied by the thousands of other chemicals, poisons and cancer causing agents that they were delivered simultaneously with your cigarettes. Everyone should know for a fact that there is no drug that is ever going to be prescribed that carries a one in two chance of being fatal--and cigarettes do carry that risk.

Life goes on after quitting. Most people do in fact get healthier and don't develop such reactions from quitting. But there are people who do have masked problems or problems that were being treated by medications already that may require dose adjustments after quitting. This is because your body eventually returns to normal after quitting.

Normal doesn't mean what it was like the day before you quit, normal means returning to a state that your body was designed to be in before you ever took up smoking--with aging thrown in. No one knows what that normal state is until they get there--and for some people normal is a state where they have some chemical imbalances or conditions that may require medical intervention. It can be very uncomfortable or even dangerous to ignore such conditions and just write them off to not smoking.

So again, for those of you who quit and feel great, know that this is a common reaction and you should be grateful that things have gone the way they have. For those of you who have discovered problems, know too that this is possible but there are likely therapies of one sort or another to make these problems better and you should not put up with sustained suffering any longer than necessary. Both groups should know that they are healthier since they quit for the mere fact that they did quit and will likely stay healthier, smell better, have more control over their life, and likely live happier and longer as long as they always remember to never take another puff!

Joel

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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 Oct 2003, 19:40 #43

Image
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Dec 2003, 01:40 #44

The Cast of Masking Actors is Vast

We're told that a burning cigarette releases over 3,500 chemical particles and more than 500 different gases. Yes, the cigarette additive chocolate (only one of more than 500 discovered in U.S. tobacco products) sounds pretty harmless but what are the long term health risks of lighting it on fire and breathing its fumes? Frankly, I doubt that science yet knows. Aside from the above 4,000 chemicals, nicotine alone is capable of some Image wild masking.

Nicotine is the tobacco plant's natural protection from being eaten by insects. Drop for drop it's more lethal than strychnine and three times deadlier than arsenic. Yet, amazingly, by chance, this poison and natural insecticide's chemical structure is so similar to the neurotransmitter acetylcholine that once inside the brain it fits a host of chemical locks permitting it direct and indirect control over the flow of more than 200 neurochemicals.

If you should have an underlying hidden health concern, isn't it better to recognize and deal with it now! Only one rule, no nicotine today! John
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

10 Jan 2004, 00:52 #45

Image
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

19 Apr 2004, 02:18 #46

Imagefor Jon
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 Jul 2004, 06:03 #47

Image
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 Jul 2004, 06:03 #48

From: Joel Sent: 6/24/2003 2:24 PM
This post brings up such an important point to work with your health care providers in the event that something seems wrong after quitting. For some people things may just happen at some point in time after quitting that were going to happen whether they had quit smoking or not. In a few other people, conditions that may have actually existed when they were smoking and were being masked may now present noticeable symptoms for the first time .

Either way, there are likely treatments available for these conditions if they just get properly diagnosed. What it so ironic is how a people can be afraid to go to a doctor for risk that he or she may prescribe a medication for a problem that smoking was "treating" and now the patient is afraid of the side effects of the new medication.

Well in the case of the bronchodialators you had said you found out were in cigarettes, the prescribed medication may be the same as ones found in smoke, but now not being accompanied by the thousands of other chemicals, poisons and cancer causing agents that they were delivered simultaneously with your cigarettes. Everyone should know for a fact that there is no drug that is ever going to be prescribed that carries a one in two chance of being fatal--and cigarettes do carry that risk.

Life goes on after quitting. Most people do in fact get healthier and don't develop such reactions from quitting. But there are people who do have masked problems or problems that were being treated by medications already that may require dose adjustments after quitting. This is because your body eventually returns to normal after quitting.

Normal doesn't mean what it was like the day before you quit, normal means returning to a state that your body was designed to be in before you ever took up smoking--with aging thrown in. No one knows what that normal state is until they get there--and for some people normal is a state where they have some chemical imbalances or conditions that may require medical intervention. It can be very uncomfortable or even dangerous to ignore such conditions and just write them off to not smoking.

So again, for those of you who quit and feel great, know that this is a common reaction and you should be grateful that things have gone the way they have. For those of you who have discovered problems, know too that this is possible but there are likely therapies of one sort or another to make these problems better and you should not put up with sustained suffering any longer than necessary. Both groups should know that they are healthier since they quit for the mere fact that they did quit and will likely stay healthier, smell better, have more control over their life, and likely live happier and longer as long as they always remember to never take another puff!

Joel

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cherylmcc
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 20:07

11 Jul 2004, 06:06 #49

Thanks, Joel, I hadn't found this thread yet.

Cheryl
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