"You Were a Lot Healthier Before You quit Smoking!"

Hilary )
Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 20:42

27 May 2002, 05:36 #31

Hi Kristin:
Congratulations on your stats! Yes, yes and yes. I, also didn't have the coughing. I did have the tiredness and I did have the acne. It does all go away -- just make sure you drink alot of water and eat correctly to help rid yourself of the toxins! Attitude is everything -- concentrate on the better coloring, the healing that's taking place and your smoke free life! Image
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 Dec 2002, 01:15 #32

Image
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Dec 2002, 01:36 #33

Image
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

13 Feb 2003, 04:40 #34

This post brings up such an important point to work with your health care providers in the event that something seems wrong after quitting. For some people things may just happen at some point in time after quitting that were going to happen whether they had quit smoking or not. In a few other people, conditions that may have actually existed when they were smoking and were being masked may now present noticeable symptoms for the first time .

Either way, there are likely treatments available for these conditions if they just get properly diagnosed. What it so ironic is how a people can be afraid to go to a doctor for risk that he or she may prescribe a medication for a problem that smoking was "treating" and now the patient is afraid of the side effects of the new medication.

Well in the case of the bronchodialators you had said you found out were in cigarettes, the prescribed medication may be the same as ones found in smoke, but now not being accompanied by the thousands of other chemicals, poisons and cancer causing agents that they were delivered simultaneously with your cigarettes. Everyone should know for a fact that there is no drug that is ever going to be prescribed that carries a one in two chance of being fatal--and cigarettes do carry that risk.

Life goes on after quitting. Most people do in fact get healthier and don't develop such reactions from quitting. But there are people who do have masked problems or problems that were being treated by medications already that may require dose adjustments after quitting. This is because your body eventually returns to normal after quitting.

Normal doesn't mean what it was like the day before you quit, normal means returning to a state that your body was designed to be in before you ever took up smoking--with aging thrown in. No one knows what that normal state is until they get there--and for some people normal is a state where they have some chemical imbalances or conditions that may require medical intervention. It can be very uncomfortable or even dangerous to ignore such conditions and just write them off to not smoking.

So again, for those of you who quit and feel great, know that this is a common reaction and you should be grateful that things have gone the way they have. For those of you who have discovered problems, know too that this is possible but there are likely therapies of one sort or another to make these problems better and you should not put up with sustained suffering any longer than necessary. Both groups should know that they are healthier since they quit for the mere fact that they did quit and will likely stay healthier, smell better, have more control over their life, and likely live happier and longer as long as they always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Feb 2003, 20:27 #35

Image
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

29 Apr 2003, 23:25 #36

Image several of Freedom's members are facing or learning about other heath problems that have surfaced for them since quitting smoking. Did smoking cause them?.....they may have, but in many instances, smoking has masked them and just now they are surfacing.

It is important to remember that no matter what, we are far healthier having quit than we would have been had we continued smoking.

for Freedom's members who are dealing with new or continuing health problems, please know that you are in all of our thoughts and prayers.
Image
Linda
after smoking 41 years.....3 years, 4 months free and a lot happier
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Shinelady Gold3282003
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

30 Apr 2003, 00:03 #37

Yes, not all of us are feeling like running a marathon now that we have quit smoking. I love the fact that this site dwells on the positives of quitting smoking, but everyone needs to be reminded what smoking can and does do to us. I know that I have gained weight and I have other health issues, but my doctor told me that of all that I could do for myself not one thing would I benefit more from than NOT SMOKING!!... He told me if I didn't do not one other thing for myself to do one thing, it is NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!!...
yqs, sue
One month, 18 hours, 9 minutes and 32 seconds. 1270 cigarettes not smoked, saving $183.31. Life saved: 4 days, 9 hours, 50 minutes.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

13 May 2003, 22:22 #38

I just got the following article from AOL news service. I thought this one sentence from the article says a lot:

"There are some people who would just rather live with asthma than without their cigarettes."


Smoking Rates in Adults With Asthma Exceed National Average

Researchers See Emergency Department Visits as Opportunities
For Smoking Cessation Advice

NORTHBROOK, Ill., May 13 /PRNewswire/ -- Cigarette smoking is more prevalent in adults with acute asthma than in adults without asthma, says a study published in the May issue of CHEST, the peer-reviewed journal of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP). The study found that 35 percent of adults seeking emergency medical care for asthma complications currently smoke cigarettes, as compared to a national average of 24 percent. Study results also indicated asthmatic smokers are more likely to share certain characteristics, including being Caucasian, having a lower household income, and lacking both a primary care physician and private insurance.

The study, conducted by researchers from Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY; Long Medical Center, Baton Rouge, LA; University of California, San Francisco, CA; and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, evaluated the prevalence of cigarette smoking among adults presenting to the emergency department with acute asthma and identified the factors associated with current smoking status. Researchers combined data from four prospective studies of the Multicenter Airway Research Collaboration, in which a total of 1,847 patients with acute asthma were surveyed in 64 emergency departments in 21 US states and four Canadian provinces. Of the patients surveyed, 35 percent were current smokers, 23 percent were former smokers, and 42 percent had no prior smoking history. Previous studies by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have indicated that 24 percent of the general adult population in the United States currently smoke.(1)

"Cigarette smoke by itself is a lung irritant, and one would think that asthmatics would be the group most likely to avoid cigarettes," said lead author Robert A. Silverman, MD, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine. "The fact that so many asthmatics regularly smoke cigarettes may simply reflect how addictive cigarettes are. There are some people who would just rather live with asthma than without their cigarettes."

When asked to identify the cause of current asthma problems, only four percent of smokers indicated smoking as a factor. However, 50 percent of current smokers indicated that smoking was typically a factor in making their asthma symptoms worse. Although smoking rates were high in the entire patient group, several demographic and historical factors were associated with current smoking status. When compared to former or never smokers, current smokers more often were between the ages of 30 and 39, Caucasian, lacked a high school diploma, and lived on a lower household income. In addition, the majority of current smokers lacked private insurance and a primary care provider and relied on the emergency department for treatment of acute asthma problems. According to study researchers, the high prevalence of smoking among patients who visit the emergency department with acute asthma provides emergency department physicians and staff with the opportunity to educate patients on smoking cessation and refer these individuals to outpatient programs.

"For some individuals, a visit to the emergency department for a severe asthma attack can serve as a wake-up call to stop smoking and is a prime opportunity for smoking cessation education," said Dr. Silverman. "Just hearing about the dangers of smoking at the right moment is enough to push some people to quit smoking. Not smoking will mean healthier lungs and easier breathing for asthmatics and, in the long run, will reduce the risk of lung cancer, emphysema, and heart disease."

"Patients who smoke and want to quit are more likely to succeed if they are counseled by a physician," said Udaya B. S. Prakash, MD, FCCP, President of the American College of Chest Physicians. "It is important for all physicians, whether in hospitals or private practice, to identify their patients who smoke and offer them consistent advice on smoking cessation."

CHEST is a peer-reviewed journal published by the ACCP. It is available on-line each month at www.chestjournal.org. ACCP represents more than 15,000 members who provide clinical, respiratory, and cardiothoracic patient care in the United States and throughout the world. ACCP's mission is to promote the prevention and treatment of diseases of the chest through leadership, education, research, and communication.

(1) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1998.

SOURCE American College of Chest Physicians
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

25 Jun 2003, 03:24 #39

This post brings up such an important point to work with your health care providers in the event that something seems wrong after quitting. For some people things may just happen at some point in time after quitting that were going to happen whether they had quit smoking or not. In a few other people, conditions that may have actually existed when they were smoking and were being masked may now present noticeable symptoms for the first time .

Either way, there are likely treatments available for these conditions if they just get properly diagnosed. What it so ironic is how a people can be afraid to go to a doctor for risk that he or she may prescribe a medication for a problem that smoking was "treating" and now the patient is afraid of the side effects of the new medication.

Well in the case of the bronchodialators you had said you found out were in cigarettes, the prescribed medication may be the same as ones found in smoke, but now not being accompanied by the thousands of other chemicals, poisons and cancer causing agents that they were delivered simultaneously with your cigarettes. Everyone should know for a fact that there is no drug that is ever going to be prescribed that carries a one in two chance of being fatal--and cigarettes do carry that risk.

Life goes on after quitting. Most people do in fact get healthier and don't develop such reactions from quitting. But there are people who do have masked problems or problems that were being treated by medications already that may require dose adjustments after quitting. This is because your body eventually returns to normal after quitting.

Normal doesn't mean what it was like the day before you quit, normal means returning to a state that your body was designed to be in before you ever took up smoking--with aging thrown in. No one knows what that normal state is until they get there--and for some people normal is a state where they have some chemical imbalances or conditions that may require medical intervention. It can be very uncomfortable or even dangerous to ignore such conditions and just write them off to not smoking.

So again, for those of you who quit and feel great, know that this is a common reaction and you should be grateful that things have gone the way they have. For those of you who have discovered problems, know too that this is possible but there are likely therapies of one sort or another to make these problems better and you should not put up with sustained suffering any longer than necessary. Both groups should know that they are healthier since they quit for the mere fact that they did quit and will likely stay healthier, smell better, have more control over their life, and likely live happier and longer as long as they always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
Reply

Rickgoldx5
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

25 Jun 2003, 05:03 #40

Linda
This will work better My Visit to the Lung Doctor
Rick
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