"You Were a Lot Healthier Before You quit Smoking!"

Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

29 Nov 2001, 14:19 #11

Don't know why you guys thanking me for putting this post on the board...I should be thanking you for the gentle and firm prodding I've gotten from you to address the issues of those of us thinking that we were the only ones here with existing or newly recognized problems since quitting.

I need to thank Melissa and Joel and reiterin, Marty, Nancy, Glynda, and sweet smelling Dionne, who can now run with the wind for this post and the countless others here at Freedom who have overcome huge health problems since they quit. Many of you, with your courage, have helped me and others, as well.

I cannot tell you just how important it is for those of you doing battle with other health issues, new or old, exacerbated or in remission, to keep in contact with your doctors and never be afraid to ask questions. And with those of you with new health issues or those that do not resolve themselves with your quit, please make an appointment to see a doctor. Use this thread to get it out in the open and let us know how you're doing and remember, no matter what....quitting was the best thing you could have done for yourselves and to continue healing, you must always remember to never take another puff.

And Mitch...thank you for teaching me about grabbing on to that trapeze......I have.

"But once in a while, as I'm merrily (or not so merrily) swinging along, I look ahead of me into the distance, and what do I see? I see another trapeze bar swinging toward me. It's empty, and I know, in that place in me that knows, that this new trapeze bar has my name on it. It is my next step, my growth, my aliveness
coming to get me. In my heart-of-hearts I know that for me to grow, I must release my grip on this present, well-known bar to move to the new one."


Linda
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

29 Nov 2001, 22:34 #12

I want to strongly second what Linda said here to work with your doctor if you experience any changes in conditions you are being treated for or symptoms of new problems first noticed after quitting smoking. Actually I am going to attach a few paragraphs here I have previously posted in a thread on medication adjustments. I think that it is fitting that it gets brought up whenever this string arises.

Joel



Possible Need for Medication Adjustments

Often when people quit smoking they may find that medications that were adjusted for them while smoking may be altered in effectiveness once quitting. People on hypertensives, thyroid, depression, blood sugar drugs, and others may need to get re-evaluated for proper dosages once quitting.

The first few days quitting can be very difficult to determine, what is a "normal" withdrawal and what is a medication dosage issue. But once through the first few days, if a person who is on medications for medical disorders finds him or herself having physical symptoms that just seem out of the ordinary, he or she should speak to the doctor who has him or her on the medications. Point out to the doctor that you have recently quit smoking and started to notice the specific symptoms just after quitting and that they haven't improved over time. The doctor should know the medication and potential interaction that not smoking may be adjusting for and which way the dosing may need to altered.

Treating many conditions is a partnership between you and your physician. The doctor needs your input to effectiveness of any treatment, whether it be by physical measurements or by verbally communicating how you feel while under treatment. The treatment for one condition though is your primary responsibility. The condition--nicotine addiction. It is by no means a minor medical issue, it is in fact probably the greatest controlable health threat anyone will ever face. Afterall, what other lifestyle issues carry a 50% premature mortality rate? Not to mention all the other crippling side effects that go along with long-term smoking. The treatment for this condition is your primary responsibility. To effectively treat smoking for the rest of your life simply remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Feb 2002, 20:43 #13

For Gsdstyle
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

05 Feb 2002, 21:26 #14

Linda - of course, I love this post.

You tell my story and I'm sure the story of some of us when we quit. I am sure the vast majority of ex-smokers find their health improves after they quit. I am definitely one of those ones - as you know - for whom this did not happen.

I have spent more time at the Doctors - since I first came to Freedom - than I have in my whole life!! No that it's Freedom's fault - no way - it's just that I've had so many health problems I can't believe it!! And a lot of the time I still feel sick. And off I go the Docors again! I'm sure they think I'm a hypochondriac! Well at least I'm a smoke-free hypochondriac!:-))

I have proved to myself too many times - that smoking will not fix my other health problems. All that does is re-ignite my full-blown addiction to nicotine and make me feel so full of despair and hopelessness, please God I never go there again.

So I keep wading through these other health problems... one day at a time.. and it is strange though, even though I feel physically unwell a lot of the time (there's no way I'd be running like the wind!:-)) I feel for myself - that just for today - I treasure my freedom every bit as much as the next person - it is my gift to myself - and only I know how precious that is to me - you folks have taught me that by your example. Thank you.

your quit sis
mirigirl
another nicotine addict
1 month 5 days finally free
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Feb 2002, 00:35 #15

Here Alice, in case you missed this one today.
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Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 23:27

19 Feb 2002, 02:02 #16

Hi,

I have only been into my quit for 1 week and 1 day....it has been tough at times, but luckily I am still determined to keep it up! I was hoping that I would feel GREAT after just 1 week....I mean it only seems fair that I have sacrificed the one bad vice that I had...feeling great should be my reward! I really just feel tired and spaced out! I have read that my lungs will slowly begin to repair themselves, but I wondered if that process happens quicker if exercise is involved (Not TOO strenuous!) It just seems logical that when a muscle is exercised (in this case, the lungs) it becomes stronger. Is this the case for exercise?
Thanks!
Bert
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

19 Feb 2002, 02:38 #17

Hi Bert, and welcome to Freedom

Your quit is so very new. Only just over a week and your body is still in the process of healing physically and psychologically. Like most of our members, you should be feeling much better as the days pass.

This thread is a little different than the "normal" healing that transpires. Many people in this thread are suffering from other problems that smoking had covered up but, but not necessarily caused. That's why it's so important for any of us as ex smokers to have a physical or see a doctor for any symptom or symptoms that either get worse as our quit progresses or uncovers itself over a longer period of time.

It is also important for you to know that you didn't give up your "one bad vice". You are giving up NOTHING but trouble. Smoking and nicotine are the deadliest of addictions and you are addicted to a substance that will eventually affect the health and life expectancy of one out of every two people who continue to smoke. Smoking kills 125,000 people a day. It kills almost 430,000 people in the US yearly, and it kills 4,000,000 people in the world every year. That is more than all causes of death combined including murders, suicides, war casualties, accidents, cancer, heart disease and aids.

What you are doing, is freeing yourself from a horrible addiction and you will continue healing and feeling better if you remember to never take another puff. Read as much as you can of Joel's library and learn about nicotine addiction. It will help so much in your quit.

You can do this. As we say here.....baby steps in the beginning. Before you know it, you'll be running.

hugs,

Linda...2 years free
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Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 23:27

19 Feb 2002, 03:28 #18

Thanks Linda.....I am planning on having a physical within the next couple of months.
I know I have to be patient, because obviously my lungs have only been without carcinogens for a little over a week....but I want to FEEL like I could run 10 miles if I wanted to! Baby steps...like you said. I guess I am feeling pretty darn good if I am even considering strenuous exercise, right?

Thanks again....and congrats on being 2 years smoke free!

Bert
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Feb 2002, 20:51 #19

For Eve
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Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 21:02

01 Mar 2002, 01:28 #20

I had to chuckle at mirigil's reply ...

I call myself a hypochondriac as well, but a non-smoking one :o)

I seem to be visiting doctor(s) alot as well, at least once on a weekly basis for the past 3 weeks.
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Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 23:27

19 Mar 2002, 16:37 #21

Well, I'm glad i read this thread, I feel a little better now. I don't have anything surfacing, but I'm not feeling more healthy like I thought I would. I've had to revisit some of the other reasons I quit smoking, because the first reason was that I wanted to feel better. My "inner-junkie" has been whispering "well if you're not going to feel better, you might as well smoke" It's addiction rearing it's ugly head. Happens whan I'm not even wanting a cigarette. I have some other really important reasons for quitting too, so I'm focusing on those for now, with the hope that eventually I will feel better physically. It's only been 3 weeks for crying out loud! Have some Patience! I think that cigarettes really reinforced that satisfaction-on-demand mentality in me and maybe in all of us. So here I am with high resolve, to never take anothr puff.

betsybee
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

19 Mar 2002, 17:36 #22

My doctor said this to me last week, but he WAS joking.

I had a chest infection, following a bout of flu in January. So I've seen him twice in two months, compared with once in the previous 8 years!!!! He was sympathising with the fact that I've quit smoking, started going to the gym three times a week, introduced a n improved eating regimen (regular breakfast, lots of fruit and water included in my diet, etc).

He said "It doesn't seem fair that you're doing all the right things, and you get these two things in quick succession". I replied "I hope you say the same thing to me when I'm 95 years old".

As they say, even non-smokers get sick sometimes. But statistically, non-smokers will get sick less often, will respond to treatment faster when they do get sick, and they will suffer from far fewer life-threatening diseases than smokers.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

19 Mar 2002, 20:01 #23

Hi Everybody.
I just had a scary 3 day asthma attack. Went to doctors!! AGAIN. 2nd time on heavy meds since beginning of January. But that's OK. At least I STOPPED KILLING myself.
I like this thread too and I've been reading posts since November about people feeling worse since they quit smoking. I quit smoking in October, finally!
Well, my quit is defininitely a combination. I feel much better all around energy wise, except my asthma has gotten worse in ways! I've really been educated here at Freedom thanks to people like Grumpy Linda who has lots of scientific knowledge about what tobacco companies put in cigarettes , BRONCHODILATORS!!
Just this past Saturday I was in our town's local walk-in-clinic, waiting for 2 hours to see the doctor who immediately hooked me up to an oxygen breathing machine to help clear my lungs for 10 minutes. (I could hardly walk - allergies, my lungs were twitchy) I'll finish up this post to say, I have allergic asthma SOOOOOOOOO if I were smoking TOO, I'd be ALOT WORSE.
The doctor, a wonderful woman, her first question with her hands on her hips and wiggling her finger in my face was,
"Do you SMOKE?"
I was so happy to say, "NO, I QUIT" for the first time in 30 years I didn't lie to a doctor!!!.
Happy to be nicotine free and getting better NOT worse!!!
YQS
Alice
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 Apr 2002, 20:47 #24

For Eener
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:14

08 Apr 2002, 22:58 #25

Linda, would you believe someone actually said I looked better when I was smoking because of my weight gain. (I have gained 20 pounds but at least I have lungs). I actually felt bad for about 1 second and then thought: Hey, at least fat girls can walk and breath at the same time. LOL! Still clean and thankful for FREEDOM

Thanks for the post.

Liz
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Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:33

09 Apr 2002, 19:46 #26

My hubby has also said this to me...(and I'm sure my dr thinks I'm nuts).

Since I quit smoking, I've had a sinus infection, some nasty stomach bug thing, and most recently, chest pain, dizziness and high blood pressure. Saw my dr on Friday and she was very pleased when I told her I had quit. Seems the chest pain and high blood pressure were a direct result from a energy booster/fat burner I was taking; since she told me to quit those, the episodes have definitely slowed WAYYY down. However, I'm still having dizzy spells that we will be checking into.

When I mentioned to her that all this started after quitting smoking, she said that existing problems will usually surface after quitting. But under no circumstances should I start smoking again; I told her that was not a problem! I even told her about Freedom and whyquit.com so she could pass the info on to other patients if she wanted to.

Have a great day, everybody!!

3 Months 1 Week 5 Days 7 Hours 45 Minutes 37 Seconds. Cigarettes not smoked: 2353. Money saved: $588.36.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

09 Apr 2002, 20:00 #27

I like the sound of your doctor, Anna . She sounds like a clued up lady !!! That point about the energy booster you were taking raises an important point, which is that people quitting who are already on some form of regular medication should consult their doctors when they quit, in case the medication needs adjusting. There is a thread called "Medication Adjustments when Quitting" which I can't find, but maybe someone else will bring up. In your case, your doctor took you right off the drug, and I guess that's because your energy doesn't need boosting now you've quit

The dizzy spells are probably not in any way quit related,. They're common in the first few days, often caused by the extra oxygen flow to the brain, but after 3 months they're almost certainly something else. Glad your doctor is investigating that for you
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 Apr 2002, 12:42 #28

I am reposting my reply to Linda here in lieu of the post from Marie Ree and her breathing question.

Hello Linda:

This post brings up such an important point to work with your health care providers in the event that something seems wrong after quitting. For some people things may just happen at some point in time after quitting that were going to happen whether they had quit smoking or not. In a few other people, conditions that may have actually existed when they were smoking and were being masked may now present noticeable symptoms for the first time .

Either way, there are likely treatments available for these conditions if they just get properly diagnosed. What it so ironic is how a people can be afraid to go to a doctor for risk that he or she may prescribe a medication for a problem that smoking was "treating" and now the patient is afraid of the side effects of the new medication.

Well in the case of the bronchodialators you had said you found out were in cigarettes, the prescribed medication may be the same as ones found in smoke, but now not being accompanied by the thousands of other chemicals, poisons and cancer causing agents that they were delivered simultaneously with your cigarettes. Everyone should know for a fact that there is no drug that is ever going to be prescribed that carries a one in two chance of being fatal--and cigarettes do carry that risk.

Life goes on after quitting. Most people do in fact get healthier and don't develop such reactions from quitting. But there are people who do have masked problems or problems that were being treated by medications already that may require dose adjustments after quitting. This is because your body eventually returns to normal after quitting.

Normal doesn't mean what it was like the day before you quit, normal means returning to a state that your body was designed to be in before you ever took up smoking--with aging thrown in. No one knows what that normal state is until they get there--and for some people normal is a state where they have some chemical imbalances or conditions that may require medical intervention. It can be very uncomfortable or even dangerous to ignore such conditions and just write them off to not smoking.

So again, for those of you who quit and feel great, know that this is a common reaction and you should be grateful that things have gone the way they have. For those of you who have discovered problems, know too that this is possible but there are likely therapies of one sort or another to make these problems better and you should not put up with sustained suffering any longer than necessary. Both groups should know that they are healthier since they quit for the mere fact that they did quit and will likely stay healthier, smell better, have more control over their life, and likely live happier and longer as long as they always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 May 2002, 11:43 #29

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Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 20:41

26 May 2002, 14:46 #30

This is a question for Joel or anyone who might have gone through something similiar. Since quitting I have not been coughing or bringing up phlem like I am hearing about so much however I am sleeping for as much as 3 hours more a night and am tired much earlier in the evening than I used to be. Also my skin has broken out worse than it ever did as a teen ager although my color is much better. My question-could these things be the result of my body slowly ridding itself of toxins from cigs even after a month? I do realize you can not give med advice-just curious if anyone knows anything about this. Thanks.
Kristin
1 month 2 days
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Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 20:42

27 May 2002, 05:36 #31

Hi Kristin:
Congratulations on your stats! Yes, yes and yes. I, also didn't have the coughing. I did have the tiredness and I did have the acne. It does all go away -- just make sure you drink alot of water and eat correctly to help rid yourself of the toxins! Attitude is everything -- concentrate on the better coloring, the healing that's taking place and your smoke free life!
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 Dec 2002, 01:15 #32

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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Dec 2002, 01:36 #33

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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

13 Feb 2003, 04:40 #34

This post brings up such an important point to work with your health care providers in the event that something seems wrong after quitting. For some people things may just happen at some point in time after quitting that were going to happen whether they had quit smoking or not. In a few other people, conditions that may have actually existed when they were smoking and were being masked may now present noticeable symptoms for the first time .

Either way, there are likely treatments available for these conditions if they just get properly diagnosed. What it so ironic is how a people can be afraid to go to a doctor for risk that he or she may prescribe a medication for a problem that smoking was "treating" and now the patient is afraid of the side effects of the new medication.

Well in the case of the bronchodialators you had said you found out were in cigarettes, the prescribed medication may be the same as ones found in smoke, but now not being accompanied by the thousands of other chemicals, poisons and cancer causing agents that they were delivered simultaneously with your cigarettes. Everyone should know for a fact that there is no drug that is ever going to be prescribed that carries a one in two chance of being fatal--and cigarettes do carry that risk.

Life goes on after quitting. Most people do in fact get healthier and don't develop such reactions from quitting. But there are people who do have masked problems or problems that were being treated by medications already that may require dose adjustments after quitting. This is because your body eventually returns to normal after quitting.

Normal doesn't mean what it was like the day before you quit, normal means returning to a state that your body was designed to be in before you ever took up smoking--with aging thrown in. No one knows what that normal state is until they get there--and for some people normal is a state where they have some chemical imbalances or conditions that may require medical intervention. It can be very uncomfortable or even dangerous to ignore such conditions and just write them off to not smoking.

So again, for those of you who quit and feel great, know that this is a common reaction and you should be grateful that things have gone the way they have. For those of you who have discovered problems, know too that this is possible but there are likely therapies of one sort or another to make these problems better and you should not put up with sustained suffering any longer than necessary. Both groups should know that they are healthier since they quit for the mere fact that they did quit and will likely stay healthier, smell better, have more control over their life, and likely live happier and longer as long as they always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Feb 2003, 20:27 #35

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