"You Were a Lot Healthier Before You quit Smoking!"

GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

29 Nov 2001, 14:19 #11

Don't know why you guys thanking me for putting this post on the board...I should be thanking you for the gentle and firm prodding I've gotten from you to address the issues of those of us thinking that we were the only ones here with existing or newly recognized problems since quitting.

I need to thank Melissa and Joel and reiterin, Marty, Nancy, Glynda, and sweet smelling Dionne, who can now run with the wind for this post and the countless others here at Freedom who have overcome huge health problems since they quit. Many of you, with your courage, have helped me and others, as well.

I cannot tell you just how important it is for those of you doing battle with other health issues, new or old, exacerbated or in remission, to keep in contact with your doctors and never be afraid to ask questions. And with those of you with new health issues or those that do not resolve themselves with your quit, please make an appointment to see a doctor. Use this thread to get it out in the open and let us know how you're doing and remember, no matter what....quitting was the best thing you could have done for yourselves and to continue healing, you must always remember to never take another puff.

And Mitch...thank you for teaching me about grabbing on to that trapeze......I have.

"But once in a while, as I'm merrily (or not so merrily) swinging along, I look ahead of me into the distance, and what do I see? I see another trapeze bar swinging toward me. It's empty, and I know, in that place in me that knows, that this new trapeze bar has my name on it. It is my next step, my growth, my aliveness
coming to get me. In my heart-of-hearts I know that for me to grow, I must release my grip on this present, well-known bar to move to the new one."

Image
Linda
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

29 Nov 2001, 22:34 #12

I want to strongly second what Linda said here to work with your doctor if you experience any changes in conditions you are being treated for or symptoms of new problems first noticed after quitting smoking. Actually I am going to attach a few paragraphs here I have previously posted in a thread on medication adjustments. I think that it is fitting that it gets brought up whenever this string arises.

Joel



Possible Need for Medication Adjustments

Often when people quit smoking they may find that medications that were adjusted for them while smoking may be altered in effectiveness once quitting. People on hypertensives, thyroid, depression, blood sugar drugs, and others may need to get re-evaluated for proper dosages once quitting.

The first few days quitting can be very difficult to determine, what is a "normal" withdrawal and what is a medication dosage issue. But once through the first few days, if a person who is on medications for medical disorders finds him or herself having physical symptoms that just seem out of the ordinary, he or she should speak to the doctor who has him or her on the medications. Point out to the doctor that you have recently quit smoking and started to notice the specific symptoms just after quitting and that they haven't improved over time. The doctor should know the medication and potential interaction that not smoking may be adjusting for and which way the dosing may need to altered.

Treating many conditions is a partnership between you and your physician. The doctor needs your input to effectiveness of any treatment, whether it be by physical measurements or by verbally communicating how you feel while under treatment. The treatment for one condition though is your primary responsibility. The condition--nicotine addiction. It is by no means a minor medical issue, it is in fact probably the greatest controlable health threat anyone will ever face. Afterall, what other lifestyle issues carry a 50% premature mortality rate? Not to mention all the other crippling side effects that go along with long-term smoking. The treatment for this condition is your primary responsibility. To effectively treat smoking for the rest of your life simply remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Feb 2002, 20:43 #13

Image For Gsdstyle
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mirigirl (silver)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

05 Feb 2002, 21:26 #14

Linda - of course, I love this post.

You tell my story and I'm sure the story of some of us when we quit. I am sure the vast majority of ex-smokers find their health improves after they quit. I am definitely one of those ones - as you know - for whom this did not happen.

I have spent more time at the Doctors - since I first came to Freedom - than I have in my whole life!! No that it's Freedom's fault - no way - it's just that I've had so many health problems I can't believe it!! And a lot of the time I still feel sick. And off I go the Docors again! I'm sure they think I'm a hypochondriac! Well at least I'm a smoke-free hypochondriac!:-))

I have proved to myself too many times - that smoking will not fix my other health problems. All that does is re-ignite my full-blown addiction to nicotine and make me feel so full of despair and hopelessness, please God I never go there again.

So I keep wading through these other health problems... one day at a time.. and it is strange though, even though I feel physically unwell a lot of the time (there's no way I'd be running like the wind!:-)) I feel for myself - that just for today - I treasure my freedom every bit as much as the next person - it is my gift to myself - and only I know how precious that is to me - you folks have taught me that by your example. Thank you.

your quit sis
mirigirl
another nicotine addict
1 month 5 days finally free
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Feb 2002, 00:35 #15

Here Alice, in case you missed this one today.
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Bert
Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 23:27

19 Feb 2002, 02:02 #16

Hi,

I have only been into my quit for 1 week and 1 day....it has been tough at times, but luckily I am still determined to keep it up! I was hoping that I would feel GREAT after just 1 week....I mean it only seems fair that I have sacrificed the one bad vice that I had...feeling great should be my reward! I really just feel tired and spaced out! I have read that my lungs will slowly begin to repair themselves, but I wondered if that process happens quicker if exercise is involved (Not TOO strenuous!) It just seems logical that when a muscle is exercised (in this case, the lungs) it becomes stronger. Is this the case for exercise?
Thanks!
Bert
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

19 Feb 2002, 02:38 #17

Hi Bert, and welcome to FreedomImage

Your quit is so very new. Only just over a week and your body is still in the process of healing physically and psychologically. Like most of our members, you should be feeling much better as the days pass.

This thread is a little different than the "normal" healing that transpires. Many people in this thread are suffering from other problems that smoking had covered up but, but not necessarily caused. That's why it's so important for any of us as ex smokers to have a physical or see a doctor for any symptom or symptoms that either get worse as our quit progresses or uncovers itself over a longer period of time.

It is also important for you to know that you didn't give up your "one bad vice". You are giving up NOTHING but trouble. Smoking and nicotine are the deadliest of addictions and you are addicted to a substance that will eventually affect the health and life expectancy of one out of every two people who continue to smoke. Smoking kills 125,000 people a day. It kills almost 430,000 people in the US yearly, and it kills 4,000,000 people in the world every year. That is more than all causes of death combined including murders, suicides, war casualties, accidents, cancer, heart disease and aids.

What you are doing, is freeing yourself from a horrible addiction and you will continue healing and feeling better if you remember to never take another puff. Read as much as you can of Joel's library and learn about nicotine addiction. It will help so much in your quit.

You can do this. As we say here.....baby steps in the beginning. Before you know it, you'll be running.

hugs,
Image
Linda...2 years free
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Bert
Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 23:27

19 Feb 2002, 03:28 #18

Thanks Linda.....I am planning on having a physical within the next couple of months.
I know I have to be patient, because obviously my lungs have only been without carcinogens for a little over a week....but I want to FEEL like I could run 10 miles if I wanted to! Baby steps...like you said. I guess I am feeling pretty darn good if I am even considering strenuous exercise, right?

Thanks again....and congrats on being 2 years smoke free!

Bert
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Feb 2002, 20:51 #19

Image For Eve
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Pauline (GOLD )
Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 21:02

01 Mar 2002, 01:28 #20

I had to chuckle at mirigil's reply ...

I call myself a hypochondriac as well, but a non-smoking one :o)

I seem to be visiting doctor(s) alot as well, at least once on a weekly basis for the past 3 weeks.
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