Yes you can! Yes you have! Yes you are!

Yes you can! Yes you have! Yes you are!

Managers
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:58

20 May 2002, 20:10 #1

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Last edited by Managers on 07 Mar 2009, 13:01, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 May 2002, 09:03 #2

Welcome to Freedom! We've been waiting on you!
If you have the ability to quit smoking nicotine for just
one hour then you have the basic building block tool
needed to achieve 72 hours of healing and a nicotine
clean body! This is doable! Don't quit forever but just
for today! We'll worry about tomorrow when it gets
here! Baby steps to glory! Let the healing begin!
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Joanne Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

06 Jun 2002, 01:21 #3

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Last edited by Joanne Gold on 07 Mar 2009, 13:36, edited 4 times in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Jun 2002, 22:11 #4

Welcome to Freedom! We sure are glad you found us! This Image forum is unlike any other you'll find anywhere on the net. While cold turkey will again this year produce more successful ex-users than all other quitting methods combined, an understanding of why we used nicotine combined with an appreciation of the law of addiction can dramatically enhance our odds of success while providing the insights needed to stay free.

The odds of any uneducated and unsupported cessation attempt lasting for a year are roughly 5%. The odds of an educated and supported quitter who follows just one rule - no nicotine just one day at a time - are 100%!

Freedom puts education above all else! We may want to build a skyscraper but if we don't know how it can prove rather challenging. Although it can be done, why try to land the plane without putting the wheels down.

None of us are stronger than nicotine but then we don't need to be as nicotine is simply a chemical with an I.Q. of zero! It cannot think, plan, plot or conspire and is not some monster or demon that dwells within. Our greatest weapon was always our intelligence but only if put to work. Knowlege is power! Education is a quittin method!

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,

John
Last edited by John (Gold) on 07 Mar 2009, 13:23, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Jul 2002, 22:36 #5


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Get a good grip on

the next few minutes!
Last edited by John (Gold) on 07 Mar 2009, 13:33, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Aug 2002, 15:54 #6

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It was hard work planning our lives around each mandatory nicotine feeding. Quitting smoking is a temporary period of adjustment during which leads to a deep sense of inner calmness at not having to think or worry about smoking nicotine again. Baby steps, just one hour at a time and then celebrate! Soon you'll have built an entire day! The next hour is entirely doable. It's your birthright to be free and there is never a better time to begin your healing than before that next mandatory feeding. Breathe deep, hug hard, live long! John
Last edited by John (Gold) on 07 Mar 2009, 13:37, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 Aug 2002, 09:29 #7

Just One Hour at a Time!
Many users flop at recovery because they allow their mind to convince them that the mountain is just too high to climb. There in front of them stands a 72 hour climb that can seem a bit lengthy but is entirely doable by every nicotine addict on earth! Although the view from the summit is breathtaking, for nearly five million of us the dream of ever seeing it will die this year. Why? Image

Were we too lazy, weak, afraid of heights or was our desire insufficient? Was the climb too hard? No! Most of us talked ourselves into believing that there were just too many steps to take that quicker solution was to put nicotine back into our bloodstream. Like our reaction to seeing long lines at an amusement theme park, we simply didn't have the patience to wait in line to experience the unknown.

Long term users have very little memory of what residing inside an unaddicted was like. You can tell a 40 year smoker that within just 90 days of stopping that they can expect to experience an almost one-third improvement in their lung function. But if they can't imagine or remember what healthy lungs were like you've wasted your breath. You can tell them that it's far easier being a comfortable ex-user than it is arranging each and every day of their lives around feeding an endless need, but if they don't recall how calm it was inside their mind prior to becoming captive to their endless cycle of rising and falling blood serum nicotine levels, again, we've wasted more breath.
If elephant were the best tasting meat in the world and we told you that you had to eat an entire two ton elephant, you'd say "impossible!" Eating four thousand pounds of elephant is a far greater challenge than the 72 hours it takes for your body to become nicotine free and feel withdrawal peak, but not impossible. How do you eat a 4,000 pound elephant? One bite at a time! How do you make a 72 hour climb to the top of withdrawal's mountain? One step at a time.
We smokers and oral nicotine users are impatient people. We want results now! But it isn't our fault. Our minds have been conditioned by our addiction to expect immediate relief from the anxiety of early withdrawal, which for smokers always arrives within 10 seconds of sucking new nicotine into our lungs. Within 20 to 30 minutes our blood nicotine level would again fall to the point that minor discomfort or urges would arrive and again we'd obtain almost immediate relief as new nicotine laden smoke was sucked into crying lungs.
A pack a day smoker repeats this cycle of obtaining immediate relief about 7,300 times a year. Yes, users are impatient when it comes to bringing an abrupt halt to the symptoms of withdrawal but we've got reason to be. Our chemical addiction red powerful feeding patterns and recovery doesn't happen overnight.
Successful ex-users are those who learn to control their impatience by ignoring the size of the elephant or the height of the mountain, as they continue taking just one bite and one step at a time. There are many tasks in life that require baby steps in order to finish what we've started. We can't build a beautiful wall with just one brick, receive a new baby after one month of pregnancy, obtain a college degree with just one class or cook a delicious holiday dinner in a few short minutes. Imagine getting half the meal cooked and then leaving the kitchen or building half a wall and walking away. Going the distance in life is normal. Swimming half way across the pool and stopping is not.
Quit for one hour. Keep your eye on the path and try not to look ahead. Embrace the hour don't dread it. It doesn't have to be difficult. It could be flat and level or it might be a bit bumpy but either way it's just one hour and reflects one of the most intense hours of chemical purging your body will ever know. The 72 hours needed to reach the top of withdrawal's mountain are each wonderful hours of glorious healing. With the passing of each your body grows cleaner as 25% of all remaining nicotine is removed from your blood (nicotine's human half-life is about two hours).
You know that all crave episodes will peak within three minutes (keep a clock handy). You know that no hour lasts for more than 60 minutes. You know that the next few minutes are entirely doable. You know that no matter what challenge circumstances life throws your way withdrawal and recovery are your temporary stepping stones to ending a cycle of need that destroys a bit more of your body with each passing year. You know that soon the hour will be over and you can celebrate another hour of healing!
72 hours and 72 opportunities to celebrate a new nicotine free beginning! Enjoy each of them! Be proud of yourself for standing tall! Just one step at a time! If we do this right then we'll only need to do it once! It's a nice feeling to never have to quit again.
You deserve to see the view from the top, to feel withdrawal peak in intensity! You're paying your dues. Is's your birthright to be free. Yes, why not trade places with our chemical dependency and put it under arrest. We've earned the right to experience nicotine-free life! Remember, there are hundreds of millions of former ex-users alive on earth today and not were stronger than you! It was never really about strength anyway but understanding, about learning why there's no need to be afraid of coming home. Patience! Give yourself a chance to meet the real unaddicted you! Stay clean for just one hour and then celebrate! Remember, your crave is going to end whether you feed it or not. Why not bring them to a permanent end! The next few minutes are doable!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long, John : )
Last edited by John (Gold) on 07 Mar 2009, 14:12, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

10 Aug 2002, 19:59 #8

Can you go for the next few minutes without
introducing nicotine back your bloodstream?
Are the next few minutes entirely doable?
If so, adopt the concept of staying clean for just the next
few
minutes so as to allow you to build an entire hour of healing.

And then ...


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Last edited by John (Gold) on 07 Mar 2009, 14:17, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 Aug 2002, 17:37 #9

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This could be you, but without the rolls Image
Last edited by John (Gold) on 07 Mar 2009, 14:18, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Sep 2002, 20:00 #10

Joel's Reinforcement Library
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"Take it ONE DAY AT A TIME"



This concept is taught by almost all programs which are devoted to dealing with substance abuse or emotional conflict of any kind. The reason that it is so often quoted is that it is universally applicable to almost any traumatic situation.

Dealing with quitting smoking is no exception. Along with NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!, ONE DAY AT A TIME is the key technique which gives the smoker the strength to successfully quit smoking and stay free from the powerful grip of nicotine dependence.

When first quitting, the concept of ONE DAY AT A TIME is clearly superior to the smoker thinking that he will never smoke again for the rest of his life. For when the smoker is first giving up smoking, he does not know whether or not he wants to go the rest of his life without smoking. Most of the time the smoker envisions life as a non-smoker as more stressful, painful, and less fun.

It is not until he quits smoking that he realizes his prior thoughts of what life is like as a non-smoker were wrong. Once he quits he realizes that there is life after smoking. It is a cleaner, calmer, fuller and, most important, healthier life. Now the thought of returning to smoking becomes a repulsive concept. Even though the fears have reversed, the ONE DAY AT A TIME technique should still be maintained.

Now, as an ex-smoker, he still has bad moments every now and then. Sometimes due to stress at home or work, or pleasant social situations, or to some other undefinable trigger situation, the desire for a cigarette surfaces. All he needs to do is say to himself, I won't smoke for the rest of today; tomorrow I will worry about tomorrow. The urge will be over in seconds, and the next day he probably won't even think of a cigarette.

But ONE DAY AT A TIME should not only be practiced when an urge is present. It should be practiced daily. Sometimes an ex-smoker thinks it is no longer important to think in these terms. He goes on with the idea he will not smoke again for the rest of his life. Assuming he is correct, when does he pat himself on the back for achieving his goal. When he is lying on his death bed he can enthusiastically proclaim, "I never smoked again." What a great time for positive reinforcement.

Every day the ex-smoker should wake up thinking that he is not going to smoke that day. And every night before he goes to sleep he should congratulate himself for sticking to his goal. Because pride is important in staying free from cigarettes. Not only is it important, but it is well deserved. For anyone who has quit smoking has broken free from a very powerful addiction. For the first time in years, he has gained control over his life, rather than being controlled by his cigarette. For this, he should be proud.

So tonight, when you go to sleep, pat yourself on the back and say, "Another day without smoking, I feel great." And tomorrow when you wake up, say, "I am going to try for another day. Tomorrow I will deal with tomorrow." To successfully stay free from smoking, TAKE IT ONE DAY AT A TIME and - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!



© Joel Spitzer 1995, 2000
Last edited by John (Gold) on 07 Mar 2009, 13:05, edited 1 time in total.
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