Will this get better?

Physical healing of the body and mind

Will this get better?

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 Apr 2002, 21:04 #1

In the first few days of a quit the question is often asked, "will this get better." If the concept that the physical and psychological reactions occuring are short-term and temporary is not understood, the person often gives up on the effort and ends the quit. They try to stop, get some big time physical discomfort, think this is what life is like as an ex-smoker, and go back to smoking. It is a cycle repeated over and over throughout the world throughout the history of tobacco use.

I always advise people that if the way they felt the first day or two or three was the way they were going to feel the rest of their life by quitting, they should just smoke and die prematurely. To quit smoking only to live 20 extra years in chronic pain wouldn't be worth it. But when quitting smoking, the way symptoms and reactions that mayt be experienced don't feel like this forever. What they are experiencing when the quit is not what it is like to be an ex-smoker, it is what it is like to be a smoker in drug withdrawal. This is a very temporary state. Once they get through the third day the physical withdrawal will ease up.

For those in your first few hours or days of your quit, understand the reactions this far are temporary, it is quitting running a normal course, and it will end and you will feel better. When you get flu symptoms from the flu you accept this method of accepting the temporary state of the feelings because you have had the flu before and know they improve and basically, you don't have a choice. With withdrawal, you don't believe it will end and you know you have a choice to stop it. You can smoke.

But smoking does not stop withdrawal. It just delays it off for 20 to 30 minutes. Then it starts again. Then you smoke another one. That holds you for 20 to 30 minutes. Then you need another. Get the picture. This is your life now, constantly smoking to put off withdrawal again another half hour or so. All the time poisoning your body with hundreds of poisons. By stopping you withdraw for a few days, and then get better the rest of your life.

Soon you will recognize that your life will go on without smoking. You will be able to face miserable tasks, celebrate life happy events and even just do nothing without smoking--basically live without cigarettes and without the preoccupation of smoking. The longer you are now off and the more life circumstances that you successfully overcome smoke free,the sooner this concept is believed and the the fear of life without smoking will be conquered. Hang in there during this time of uncertainty just know that it will improve and get continually better and better as long as you maintain your focus and never take another puff!

Joel

Related video:

"Will this get better?"




Many people find themselves asking the question as to whether a specific symptom or reaction they are experiencing when first quitting smoking will get better simply if they stick to their quit. If the reaction they are experiencing is simply a withdrawal effect to quitting, the answer is usually going to be yes, but sometimes the symptom is not simply a quitting smoking effect. Video discusses importance of getting symptoms professionally evaluated if they are indicative or conditions that may truly require medical intervention. 

Related videos:

Quitting smoking and mental health

Going back to normal after quitting smoking

Using cigarettes to self medicate pre-existing conditions

Is anyone else experiencing the symptom

Is this a symptom of quitting smoking

Life goes on without smoking
Last edited by Joel on 29 Oct 2016, 00:02, edited 3 times in total.
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Alice
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

23 May 2002, 08:26 #2

YES !
YQS
Alice
Silver
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wcsdancer (Gold)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:29

23 May 2002, 13:09 #3

This is so good it's worth repeating:
"What they are experiencing when they quit is not what it is like to be an ex-smoker, it is what it is like to be a smoker in drug withdrawal. This is a very temporary state. Once they get through the third day the physical withdrawal will ease up".
Another great one Joel! Image *Candy* at 6 months quit and vouching for the truth of the above quote.
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OBob Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

23 May 2002, 14:36 #4

As always, we strive for the truth here at Freedom. And, this is the truth.

ImageBob (feeling tremendous at 4 1/2 months.... as I have for a while now)
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murphying (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

23 May 2002, 15:10 #5

[font=YIKES!]Me too! (she said)....I find it hard to imagine (impossible indeed!) a situation now where smoking would be more important than my quit. I'm enjoying every moment of my 4m 3w 1d[/font]

[font=YIKES!]Ingrid Image a slave to nicotine no longer![/font]
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

10 Aug 2002, 20:27 #6

This isn't what it feels like being one of earth's over one billion comfortable ex-smokers. This is what it feels like during that temporary period of adjustment called "quitting." During this chemical and psychological period of adjustment you'll learn that adding each cigarette's 4,000 chemicals following each meal (including 44 known carcinogens) was probably not a very healthy way to eat.

You'll learn that it wasn't necessary to leave the wonderful company of those you were eating with, so that you could find a location to feed your mind's endless need to replenish constantly falling blood serum nicotine levels. You'll learn that all of the feeding patterns and habits that you selected to satisfy your chemical dependency upon nicotine were established primarily due to one simple fact -- nicotine's half-life in the human body is about two hours and it was once again time to fill your body's constantly falling supply of nicotine.

Freedom's loving graduates are not only here as support guides to help our newest generation of arrivals, but to bear witness to you that what you are feeling now truly is temporary! The next few minutes are doable! Lots of water for flushing! Breathe deep, hug hard, live long! John : )
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Joanne Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

24 Aug 2002, 04:32 #7

New Quitter: "How long will it take to feel comfortable?"
Quitter In Complete Comfort: "The experience of
living out daily activities without smoking are
the stepping stones to freedom."
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rustyblue
Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 00:15

18 Sep 2002, 21:25 #8

I can attest to this myself. I am only in my ninth day, and while smoking still frequently crosses my mind, the intense physical desire is not there.

It is more like "light a cigarette now - oh, wait a minute, I don't do that anymore". My big job now is changing patterns - finding new signals for things that used to mean a cigarette: like finishing a task at work.

If you are in your first few days, don't despair! Stick with it - just tell yourself how free you are.

Rusty Blue
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Joanne Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

14 May 2003, 14:40 #9


"But smoking does not stop withdrawal. It just delays it off for 20 to 30 minutes. Then it starts again. Then you smoke another one. That holds you for 20 to 30 minutes. Then you need another. Get the picture. This is your life now, constantly smoking to put off withdrawal again another half hour or so. All the time poisoning your body with hundreds of poisons. By stopping you withdrawal for a few days, and then get better the rest of your life."
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Jun 2003, 21:18 #10

ImageFor DVV

I cannot say that you feel better since you quit smoking because that would not seem to be the case for you yet. But I can say that you are healthier now than you would be if you had not quit smoking. Your carbon monoxide levels are now that of a person who has never smoked a day in his life. Your arteries are not being vasoconstricted over and over again every single day like they were when you were smoking. And your lungs are not being chronically assauleted hundreds of times a day with thousands of chemicals that were killing off and destroying certain tissue as well as deposting fresh and potent cancer inducing chemicals with every single drag.

We have a string up today talking about improvements that while you may not fee are real nonetheless. (see Blood clotting, heart attack risk and quitting) Your heart, circulatory system and lungs are all getting healthier and better able to function now that you don't smoke. Don't lose sight of this. Even though you may not feel better now you are getting better now and will continue to improve your health a many fronts as long as you alwayw stick to your commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
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