Will this get better?

Physical healing of the body and mind

Will this get better?

Joel
Joel

April 19th, 2002, 9:04 pm #1

In the first few days of a quit the question is often asked, "will this get better." If the concept that the physical and psychological reactions occuring are short-term and temporary is not understood, the person often gives up on the effort and ends the quit. They try to stop, get some big time physical discomfort, think this is what life is like as an ex-smoker, and go back to smoking. It is a cycle repeated over and over throughout the world throughout the history of tobacco use.

I always advise people that if the way they felt the first day or two or three was the way they were going to feel the rest of their life by quitting, they should just smoke and die prematurely. To quit smoking only to live 20 extra years in chronic pain wouldn't be worth it. But when quitting smoking, the way symptoms and reactions that mayt be experienced don't feel like this forever. What they are experiencing when the quit is not what it is like to be an ex-smoker, it is what it is like to be a smoker in drug withdrawal. This is a very temporary state. Once they get through the third day the physical withdrawal will ease up.

For those in your first few hours or days of your quit, understand the reactions this far are temporary, it is quitting running a normal course, and it will end and you will feel better. When you get flu symptoms from the flu you accept this method of accepting the temporary state of the feelings because you have had the flu before and know they improve and basically, you don't have a choice. With withdrawal, you don't believe it will end and you know you have a choice to stop it. You can smoke.

But smoking does not stop withdrawal. It just delays it off for 20 to 30 minutes. Then it starts again. Then you smoke another one. That holds you for 20 to 30 minutes. Then you need another. Get the picture. This is your life now, constantly smoking to put off withdrawal again another half hour or so. All the time poisoning your body with hundreds of poisons. By stopping you withdraw for a few days, and then get better the rest of your life.

Soon you will recognize that your life will go on without smoking. You will be able to face miserable tasks, celebrate life happy events and even just do nothing without smoking--basically live without cigarettes and without the preoccupation of smoking. The longer you are now off and the more life circumstances that you successfully overcome smoke free,the sooner this concept is believed and the the fear of life without smoking will be conquered. Hang in there during this time of uncertainty just know that it will improve and get continually better and better as long as you maintain your focus and never take another puff!

Joel

Related video:

"Will this get better?"




Many people find themselves asking the question as to whether a specific symptom or reaction they are experiencing when first quitting smoking will get better simply if they stick to their quit. If the reaction they are experiencing is simply a withdrawal effect to quitting, the answer is usually going to be yes, but sometimes the symptom is not simply a quitting smoking effect. Video discusses importance of getting symptoms professionally evaluated if they are indicative or conditions that may truly require medical intervention. 

Related videos:

Quitting smoking and mental health

Going back to normal after quitting smoking

Using cigarettes to self medicate pre-existing conditions

Is anyone else experiencing the symptom

Is this a symptom of quitting smoking

Life goes on without smoking
Last edited by Joel on October 29th, 2016, 12:02 am, edited 3 times in total.
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Alice
Alice

May 23rd, 2002, 8:26 am #2

YES !
YQS
Alice
Silver
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wcsdancer (Gold)
wcsdancer (Gold)

May 23rd, 2002, 1:09 pm #3

This is so good it's worth repeating:
"What they are experiencing when they quit is not what it is like to be an ex-smoker, it is what it is like to be a smoker in drug withdrawal. This is a very temporary state. Once they get through the third day the physical withdrawal will ease up".
Another great one Joel! *Candy* at 6 months quit and vouching for the truth of the above quote.
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OBob Gold
OBob Gold

May 23rd, 2002, 2:36 pm #4

As always, we strive for the truth here at Freedom. And, this is the truth.

Bob (feeling tremendous at 4 1/2 months.... as I have for a while now)
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murphying (Gold)
murphying (Gold)

May 23rd, 2002, 3:10 pm #5

[font=YIKES!]Me too! (she said)....I find it hard to imagine (impossible indeed!) a situation now where smoking would be more important than my quit. I'm enjoying every moment of my 4m 3w 1d[/font]

[font=YIKES!]Ingrid a slave to nicotine no longer![/font]
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

August 10th, 2002, 8:27 pm #6

This isn't what it feels like being one of earth's over one billion comfortable ex-smokers. This is what it feels like during that temporary period of adjustment called "quitting." During this chemical and psychological period of adjustment you'll learn that adding each cigarette's 4,000 chemicals following each meal (including 44 known carcinogens) was probably not a very healthy way to eat.

You'll learn that it wasn't necessary to leave the wonderful company of those you were eating with, so that you could find a location to feed your mind's endless need to replenish constantly falling blood serum nicotine levels. You'll learn that all of the feeding patterns and habits that you selected to satisfy your chemical dependency upon nicotine were established primarily due to one simple fact -- nicotine's half-life in the human body is about two hours and it was once again time to fill your body's constantly falling supply of nicotine.

Freedom's loving graduates are not only here as support guides to help our newest generation of arrivals, but to bear witness to you that what you are feeling now truly is temporary! The next few minutes are doable! Lots of water for flushing! Breathe deep, hug hard, live long! John : )
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Joanne Gold
Joanne Gold

August 24th, 2002, 4:32 am #7

New Quitter: "How long will it take to feel comfortable?"
Quitter In Complete Comfort: "The experience of
living out daily activities without smoking are
the stepping stones to freedom."
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rustyblue
rustyblue

September 18th, 2002, 9:25 pm #8

I can attest to this myself. I am only in my ninth day, and while smoking still frequently crosses my mind, the intense physical desire is not there.

It is more like "light a cigarette now - oh, wait a minute, I don't do that anymore". My big job now is changing patterns - finding new signals for things that used to mean a cigarette: like finishing a task at work.

If you are in your first few days, don't despair! Stick with it - just tell yourself how free you are.

Rusty Blue
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Joanne Gold
Joanne Gold

May 14th, 2003, 2:40 pm #9


"But smoking does not stop withdrawal. It just delays it off for 20 to 30 minutes. Then it starts again. Then you smoke another one. That holds you for 20 to 30 minutes. Then you need another. Get the picture. This is your life now, constantly smoking to put off withdrawal again another half hour or so. All the time poisoning your body with hundreds of poisons. By stopping you withdrawal for a few days, and then get better the rest of your life."
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Joel
Joel

June 7th, 2003, 9:18 pm #10

For DVV

I cannot say that you feel better since you quit smoking because that would not seem to be the case for you yet. But I can say that you are healthier now than you would be if you had not quit smoking. Your carbon monoxide levels are now that of a person who has never smoked a day in his life. Your arteries are not being vasoconstricted over and over again every single day like they were when you were smoking. And your lungs are not being chronically assauleted hundreds of times a day with thousands of chemicals that were killing off and destroying certain tissue as well as deposting fresh and potent cancer inducing chemicals with every single drag.

We have a string up today talking about improvements that while you may not fee are real nonetheless. (see Blood clotting, heart attack risk and quitting) Your heart, circulatory system and lungs are all getting healthier and better able to function now that you don't smoke. Don't lose sight of this. Even though you may not feel better now you are getting better now and will continue to improve your health a many fronts as long as you alwayw stick to your commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

July 28th, 2003, 6:37 am #11

If you're just embarking upon recovery, this isn't what it feels like being one of earth's over one billion comfortable ex-smokers. This is what it feels like during that temporary period of adjustment called "quitting." During this chemical and psychological period of adjustment you'll learn that adding each cigarette's 4,000 chemicals following each meal (including 44 known carcinogens) was probably not a very healthy way to eat.

You'll learn that it wasn't necessary to leave the wonderful company of those you were eating with, so that you could find a location to feed your mind's endless need to replenish constantly falling blood serum nicotine levels. You'll learn that all of the feeding patterns and habits that you selected to satisfy your chemical dependency upon nicotine were established primarily due to one simple fact -- nicotine's half-life in the human body is about two hours and it was once again time to fill your body's constantly falling supply of nicotine.

Freedom's loving graduates are not only here as support guides to help our newest generation of arrivals, but to bear witness to you that what you are feeling now truly is temporary! The next few minutes are doable! Lots of water for flushing! Breathe deep, hug hard, live long! John : )
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VoluntaryDebraSilver
VoluntaryDebraSilver

May 21st, 2004, 10:53 am #12

Hello Joel,

For 175 days I have wanted to light up a Camel Light 100. For 175 days I have not done this. The only true answer is #1 Bryan #2 Joel's promise it gets better and #3 I know if I light 1 I light 60 per day.
My faith is it is going to get better, everyone's quit is different.
Thanks,
DFlower
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AidaSaba1
AidaSaba1

July 30th, 2004, 11:47 am #13

The only thing that keeps me going is the hope and faith that it will get better. Right now its not as miserable as it was the first two weeks, but it is irritating. Believe it or not, I do miss having those few cigarette with a glass of wine at night after everyone goes to bed. I know that I will not do that, but the knowledge that I will not do it, does not take away the "missing" part.

Had it not been for your promises and confidence that it will get better, I would have relapsed from day 1. I certainly relate much to DFlower above me on this post (message 39).

The fact that it is now better than two weeks ago, and two weeks ago was better than three weeks ago, it follows that it must get better as we go. Perhaps slowly, but the alternative is lung cancer where the healing process is much too slow to recognize the progress, if any.

Aida
Unbelievable 1 month, 2 weeks, 1 day, 23 hours. I breathed clean air in lieu of 1,609 cigaretts and I saved $450.68 (which I happily spend on buying fruits and gum!!), and I added 5 days to my life span.
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Ouija7
Ouija7

September 30th, 2004, 1:39 am #14

YES!
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kattatonic1 gold4
kattatonic1 gold4

December 6th, 2004, 7:17 am #15

Like a new bud, give your Quit the chance to bloom.
Last edited by kattatonic1 gold4 on November 4th, 2009, 12:38 am, edited 1 time in total.
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

January 5th, 2005, 12:26 am #16

newbies...the way you feel now is NOT the way it feels as a comfortable exsmoker. the way you feel at the beginning of a quit is just a very temporary adjustment.

Remember to keep your blood sugar level up by eating smaller and more numerous, healthy meals and make sure that you get enough rest.

Linda
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September5472
September5472

January 8th, 2005, 10:48 am #17

Exactly what is the estimated time until I no longer want a cigarette. I understand the physical part is over after 72 hours, but mentally the cravings continue to come on very strong...when can I expect this to end??? How many days, weeks, months....?
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VoluntaryDebraSilver
VoluntaryDebraSilver

January 8th, 2005, 12:23 pm #18

It does get better but if I said I still don't want to smoke I would be lying. In fact last night I had a horrible smoking dream and of course awoke to feelings of guilt and sadness. BUT...get over it.....I've talked to ex smokers who haven't had a second look back and ex smokers who have thought of it for every day for 10 years. Time will tell where we all fit in but to fit in we can never take another puff.
I've been quit for 1 year, 1 month, 11 days, 20 hours, 23 minutes and 56 seconds (407 days).
I've not smoked 12205 death sticks, and saved $1,923.84.
I've saved 42 day(s), 9 hour(s) of my life.
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CMondragon21170
CMondragon21170

January 8th, 2005, 1:39 pm #19

Before I quit smoking, I would often seek out ex smokers to ask for advice, how did they do it, what was withdrawal like, etc.

The one significant thing that several (not all) said was "sometimes I really miss smoking." Some of these people had been quit for years already.

It actually made me afraid to quit. I am no stranger to feelings of missing something. I don't like that feeling. It's a sad kind of feeling. I never (prior to my quit) did well w/ feelings of sadness.

However, when I finally did quit, and I reached comfort after a couple months, maybe 3?, I realized that I do not miss smoking.

Do not miss it. And when I have a smoking thought now, it is always due to me being grateful that I quit. That I'm making it. My quit wasn't all smooth sailing, I had some rough spots. But I don't anymore. I can't imagine making it to gold, or double gold and feeling like I miss smoking.

Chevet' - Free and Healing for Four Months, Nineteen Days, 3 Hours and 33 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 9 Days and 19 Hours, by avoiding the use of 2823 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $745.34.
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cherbear
cherbear

December 26th, 2005, 1:49 am #20

This is a really good one to read. Sometimes, in the middle of a craving, you almost want to lose hope, because you think that it's going to last forever. It really does get a little bit better each day. I don't know how long I'm going to continue thinking about smoking, but I know that it's only temporary. Thanks Joel!
-cher

It's been 6 Days, 15 hours and 59 minutes since my last smoke! I've saved $40.98 and 8 hours and 15 minutes of my life by not smoking 99 cigarettes. Woohoo!!
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

February 9th, 2006, 6:30 am #21

Hang in there during this time of uncertainty just know that it will improve and get continually better and better as long as you maintain your focus and never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joel

August 23rd, 2006, 9:33 pm #22

A new study was released today from University of Southern Florida that reported that smokers who quit start suffering symptoms of withdrawal within 30 minutes of their last cigarette. I see it in various news releases as if this is ground breaking news, like no one has ever realized this before. I suspect there are a lot of smokers and ex-smokers looking at this report and thinking to themselves, "this is news?"

The results of this study kind of fits into the original post in this string.

It is kind of interesting because the researchers based their conclusions on their observations of 50 one pack a day smokers. I think that the researchers would find a little bit of a different result if they mixed one pack a day smokers with people who smoked half a pack a day or people who smoke two packs a day or more. Then they would see that the onset of symptoms are a tad more variable than they are reporting here, some shorter some longer.

The research went on to say that withdrawal symptoms peaked within 72 hours and could go on to some degree for a couple of weeks.

Then there was of course the conclusions drawn of how NRT can assist smokers during this time period. Instead of getting the message out that these symptoms are temporary, usually minor and ALWAYS non-life threatening, the study is being used as a platform to push the merits of NRT.

The bottom line is when a person stops smoking his or her body will likely start wanting nicotine. If he or she doesn't give in to the desire or perceived need, the body will adjust and in a relatively short time period the body's demand for nicotine will cease. Then for the person to avoid ever having to face these kind of physical symptoms again will be as simple as sticking to a personal commitment to never take another puff.

Joel
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gta
gta

September 9th, 2006, 4:40 pm #23

That's a great reminder for me, Tonight I was still having cravings, but they were new situations, like going into the gas station and having hundreds of packs of cigarettes and tobacco marketing stare you in the face, never realized this before now.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

November 7th, 2006, 11:20 pm #24

But smoking does not stop withdrawal. It just delays it off for 20 to 30 minutes. Then it starts again. Then you smoke another one. That holds you for 20 to 30 minutes. Then you need another. Get the picture. This is your life now, constantly smoking to put off withdrawal again another half hour or so. All the time poisoning your body with hundreds of poisons. By stopping you withdraw for a few days, and then get better the rest of your life.

Soon you will recognize that your life will go on without smoking. You will be able to face miserable tasks, celebrate life happy events and even just do nothing without smoking--basically live without cigarettes and without the preoccupation of smoking. The longer you are now off and the more life circumstances that you successfully overcome smoke free,the sooner this concept is believed and the the fear of life without smoking will be conquered. Hang in there during this time of uncertainty just know that it will improve and get continually better and better as long as you maintain your focus and never take another puff!

Joel
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Roger (Gold)
Roger (Gold)

January 27th, 2007, 4:05 pm #25

Will this get better? You can bet your life it does! What you may feel now is not how a comfortable x-smoker feels.
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