Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

February 9th, 2006, 6:30 am #21

Hang in there during this time of uncertainty just know that it will improve and get continually better and better as long as you maintain your focus and never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joel

August 23rd, 2006, 9:33 pm #22

A new study was released today from University of Southern Florida that reported that smokers who quit start suffering symptoms of withdrawal within 30 minutes of their last cigarette. I see it in various news releases as if this is ground breaking news, like no one has ever realized this before. I suspect there are a lot of smokers and ex-smokers looking at this report and thinking to themselves, "this is news?"

The results of this study kind of fits into the original post in this string.

It is kind of interesting because the researchers based their conclusions on their observations of 50 one pack a day smokers. I think that the researchers would find a little bit of a different result if they mixed one pack a day smokers with people who smoked half a pack a day or people who smoke two packs a day or more. Then they would see that the onset of symptoms are a tad more variable than they are reporting here, some shorter some longer.

The research went on to say that withdrawal symptoms peaked within 72 hours and could go on to some degree for a couple of weeks.

Then there was of course the conclusions drawn of how NRT can assist smokers during this time period. Instead of getting the message out that these symptoms are temporary, usually minor and ALWAYS non-life threatening, the study is being used as a platform to push the merits of NRT.

The bottom line is when a person stops smoking his or her body will likely start wanting nicotine. If he or she doesn't give in to the desire or perceived need, the body will adjust and in a relatively short time period the body's demand for nicotine will cease. Then for the person to avoid ever having to face these kind of physical symptoms again will be as simple as sticking to a personal commitment to never take another puff.

Joel
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gta
gta

September 9th, 2006, 4:40 pm #23

That's a great reminder for me, Tonight I was still having cravings, but they were new situations, like going into the gas station and having hundreds of packs of cigarettes and tobacco marketing stare you in the face, never realized this before now.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

November 7th, 2006, 11:20 pm #24

But smoking does not stop withdrawal. It just delays it off for 20 to 30 minutes. Then it starts again. Then you smoke another one. That holds you for 20 to 30 minutes. Then you need another. Get the picture. This is your life now, constantly smoking to put off withdrawal again another half hour or so. All the time poisoning your body with hundreds of poisons. By stopping you withdraw for a few days, and then get better the rest of your life.

Soon you will recognize that your life will go on without smoking. You will be able to face miserable tasks, celebrate life happy events and even just do nothing without smoking--basically live without cigarettes and without the preoccupation of smoking. The longer you are now off and the more life circumstances that you successfully overcome smoke free,the sooner this concept is believed and the the fear of life without smoking will be conquered. Hang in there during this time of uncertainty just know that it will improve and get continually better and better as long as you maintain your focus and never take another puff!

Joel
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Roger (Gold)
Roger (Gold)

January 27th, 2007, 4:05 pm #25

Will this get better? You can bet your life it does! What you may feel now is not how a comfortable x-smoker feels.
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Joel
Joel

December 5th, 2007, 3:37 am #26

If the symptoms a person is having is truly from quitting, they will get better. There are times though where a person may be getting symptoms from other pre-existing conditions or from new problems that may start up after they quit. Automatically saying that any symptom will get better after quitting is dangerous, in the event that the symptom a person is experiencing is from a non-quitting related issue. If this issue is simply thoughts for cigarettes, yes they will likely improve. Be careful though in writing off any physical symptom or any strong emotional reactions to simple smoking cessation, especially once past the first few days quitting.

The video below discusses smoking thoughts in a bit more detail:
Video Title
Dial-Up
HS/BB
Audio
Length
Added
"Will I ever stop thinking of cigarettes?" 3.97mb 11.9mb 1.57mb 10:47 11/20/06
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Joel
Joel

September 8th, 2008, 10:42 am #27

If the symptoms a person is having is truly from quitting, they will get better. There are times though where a person may be getting symptoms from other pre-existing conditions or from new problems that may start up after they quit. Automatically saying that any symptom will get better after quitting is dangerous, in the event that the symptom a person is experiencing is from a non-quitting related issue. If this issue is simply thoughts for cigarettes, yes they will likely improve. Be careful though in writing off any physical symptom or any strong emotional reactions to simple smoking cessation, especially once past the first few days quitting.

See video linked in 92nd post in this string.
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wendyaannn
wendyaannn

October 4th, 2008, 2:58 pm #28

The most shocking thing about reaching the "comfort" zone is realizing how completely UNCOMFORTABLE you were as an active smoker, almost every moment you weren't smoking,. And even when you could actually just relax and chain-smoke in comfort, you were never safe... too much and your lungs would start to hurt or you'd feel nauseous, or too few and you'd feel anxious and ripped off...or... Well, you know. Just never satisfied.
I feel happy and satisfied almost all the time now, when I even think about it. I am still in awe of how much "not smoking" has changed my life for the better in a million tiny ways that I could never have anticipated. I wish I could give everyone who still smokes just 10 minutes of how this feels... it's that powerful.

Just keep on keeping on, to everyone... it's woth everything!!!

Wendy Ann, 8 1/2 months of unbelievable freedom!! You can do it too and it will be better than you ever thought!
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

October 22nd, 2008, 6:18 am #29

Will this get better?
YES!
No nicotine today, just one day at a time.
Fill your brain with information about nicotine addiction and recovery.
You are worth it.
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FreedomNicotine
FreedomNicotine

January 3rd, 2010, 1:32 pm #30

If the symptoms a person is having is truly from quitting, they will get better. There are times though where a person may be getting symptoms from other pre-existing conditions or from new problems that may start up after they quit. Automatically saying that any symptom will get better after quitting is dangerous, in the event that the symptom a person is experiencing is from a non-quitting related issue. If this issue is simply thoughts for cigarettes, yes they will likely improve. Be careful though in writing off any physical symptom or any strong emotional reactions to simple smoking cessation, especially once past the first few days quitting.

The video below discusses smoking thoughts in a bit more detail:
Video Title
Dial-Up
HS/BB
MP3
Length
Added
"Will I ever stop thinking of cigarettes?" 3.97mb 11.9mb 4.89mb 10:47 11/20/06
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sboykin
sboykin

January 12th, 2011, 1:42 am #31

I'm wondering if there is research on when and/or if they go away.  It seems like the brain will eventually heal itself if we are not feeding nicotine to it.  
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Joe J free
Joe J free

January 12th, 2011, 3:56 am #32

Quick and simple answer - we are permanently wired for / susceptible to relapsing.  That's why it's acknowledged as chemical addiction dependency here at Freedom and WhyQuit.com

The Law of Addiction  states - "Administration of a drug to an addict will cause re-establishment of chemical dependence upon the addictive substance."

I've always found the following article wonderfully on point.  Hope it helps to answer your question.  Restoring volume control.

Joe J free 6 years and a day
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