Will this get better?

Physical healing of the body and mind
John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Jul 2003, 06:37 #11

If you're just embarking upon recovery, this isn't what it feels like being one of earth's over one billion comfortable ex-smokers. This is what it feels like during that temporary period of adjustment called "quitting." During this chemical and psychological period of adjustment you'll learn that adding each cigarette's 4,000 chemicals following each meal (including 44 known carcinogens) was probably not a very healthy way to eat.

You'll learn that it wasn't necessary to leave the wonderful company of those you were eating with, so that you could find a location to feed your mind's endless need to replenish constantly falling blood serum nicotine levels. You'll learn that all of the feeding patterns and habits that you selected to satisfy your chemical dependency upon nicotine were established primarily due to one simple fact -- nicotine's half-life in the human body is about two hours and it was once again time to fill your body's constantly falling supply of nicotine.

Freedom's loving graduates are not only here as support guides to help our newest generation of arrivals, but to bear witness to you that what you are feeling now truly is temporary! The next few minutes are doable! Lots of water for flushing! Breathe deep, hug hard, live long! John : )
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VoluntaryDebraSilver
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:57

21 May 2004, 10:53 #12

Hello Joel,

For 175 days I have wanted to light up a Camel Light 100. For 175 days I have not done this. The only true answer is #1 Bryan #2 Joel's promise it gets better and #3 I know if I light 1 I light 60 per day.
My faith is it is going to get better, everyone's quit is different.
Thanks,
DFlower
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AidaSaba1
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

30 Jul 2004, 11:47 #13

The only thing that keeps me going is the hope and faith that it will get better. Right now its not as miserable as it was the first two weeks, but it is irritating. Believe it or not, I do miss having those few cigarette with a glass of wine at night after everyone goes to bed. I know that I will not do that, but the knowledge that I will not do it, does not take away the "missing" part.

Had it not been for your promises and confidence that it will get better, I would have relapsed from day 1. I certainly relate much to DFlower above me on this post (message 39).

The fact that it is now better than two weeks ago, and two weeks ago was better than three weeks ago, it follows that it must get better as we go. Perhaps slowly, but the alternative is lung cancer where the healing process is much too slow to recognize the progress, if any.

Aida
Unbelievable 1 month, 2 weeks, 1 day, 23 hours. I breathed clean air in lieu of 1,609 cigaretts and I saved $450.68 (which I happily spend on buying fruits and gum!!), and I added 5 days to my life span.
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Ouija7
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:58

30 Sep 2004, 01:39 #14

YES!
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kattatonic1 gold4
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Dec 2004, 07:17 #15

ImageLike a new bud, give your Quit the chance to bloom.
Last edited by kattatonic1 gold4 on 04 Nov 2009, 00:38, edited 1 time in total.
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

05 Jan 2005, 00:26 #16

newbies...the way you feel now is NOT the way it feels as a comfortable exsmoker. the way you feel at the beginning of a quit is just a very temporary adjustment.

Remember to keep your blood sugar level up by eating smaller and more numerous, healthy meals and make sure that you get enough rest.

Linda
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September5472
Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 00:15

08 Jan 2005, 10:48 #17

Exactly what is the estimated time until I no longer want a cigarette. I understand the physical part is over after 72 hours, but mentally the cravings continue to come on very strong...when can I expect this to end??? How many days, weeks, months....?
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VoluntaryDebraSilver
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:57

08 Jan 2005, 12:23 #18

It does get better but if I said I still don't want to smoke I would be lying. In fact last night I had a horrible smoking dream and of course awoke to feelings of guilt and sadness. BUT...get over it.....I've talked to ex smokers who haven't had a second look back and ex smokers who have thought of it for every day for 10 years. Time will tell where we all fit in but to fit in we can never take another puff.
I've been quit for 1 year, 1 month, 11 days, 20 hours, 23 minutes and 56 seconds (407 days).
I've not smoked 12205 death sticks, and saved $1,923.84.
I've saved 42 day(s), 9 hour(s) of my life.
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CMondragon21170
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

08 Jan 2005, 13:39 #19

Before I quit smoking, I would often seek out ex smokers to ask for advice, how did they do it, what was withdrawal like, etc.

The one significant thing that several (not all) said was "sometimes I really miss smoking." Some of these people had been quit for years already.

It actually made me afraid to quit. I am no stranger to feelings of missing something. I don't like that feeling. It's a sad kind of feeling. I never (prior to my quit) did well w/ feelings of sadness.

However, when I finally did quit, and I reached comfort after a couple months, maybe 3?, I realized that I do not miss smoking.

Do not miss it. And when I have a smoking thought now, it is always due to me being grateful that I quit. That I'm making it. My quit wasn't all smooth sailing, I had some rough spots. But I don't anymore. I can't imagine making it to gold, or double gold and feeling like I miss smoking.

Chevet' - Free and Healing for Four Months, Nineteen Days, 3 Hours and 33 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 9 Days and 19 Hours, by avoiding the use of 2823 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $745.34.
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cherbear
Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 00:15

26 Dec 2005, 01:49 #20

This is a really good one to read. Sometimes, in the middle of a craving, you almost want to lose hope, because you think that it's going to last forever. It really does get a little bit better each day. I don't know how long I'm going to continue thinking about smoking, but I know that it's only temporary. Thanks Joel!
-cher

It's been 6 Days, 15 hours and 59 minutes since my last smoke! I've saved $40.98 and 8 hours and 15 minutes of my life by not smoking 99 cigarettes. Woohoo!!
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