Why we must never take another puff

Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

April 11th, 2002, 4:29 am #21

A funny thing happened in my current clinic. Only one person had a really past longer term quit--6 years I think. Usually a high percentage of the group have these past experiences to learn from each other from. Thought this string would be beneficial to bring up for these people--as well as all the rest of the members.

Joel
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

April 21st, 2002, 10:52 pm #22

For Probe:

I thought she may like to add her past experiences to this one.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

April 26th, 2002, 8:33 am #23

For Carolyn
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

May 16th, 2002, 7:41 pm #24

It was pretty interesting that in last night group, one man had once quit for 6 months, one woman for five days , one girl who was 17 had once tried to quit for two days, and one man who has smoked for 40 years had never tried to quit before. Normally in groups they get to witness more lost long-term quits to learn from--that did not happen here. So in the event that the four people read here, I am bringing up some post specific to this issue--that no matter how long a person is off they will lose their quit if they don't understand the bottom line law of addiction that to stay smoke free you must never take another puff!

Joel

Make sure to click here to see the original posts to this thread.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

May 19th, 2002, 6:56 am #25

For Cando
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Joined: January 9th, 2009, 8:43 pm

May 21st, 2002, 9:35 pm #26

These posts are interesting. It is amazing how many different types quits and relapses happen.

I had a 10 year quit going up to about 2 years ago. During these 2 years of smoking I have been very depressed about my inability to quit again. I really screwed up because during my long quit, I always felt that eventually I would start up smoking again. It was my own stupid way of quitting. Telling myself that basically do yourself a favor and quit for a while because you can smoke later in life when your lungs have cleaned up. Really a pretty stupid way to quit and now I realize it is because I didn't take the time to learn about the addiction. I didn't realize how much I hated the control cigs had over me. Right after starting up again I realized that I like being a non-smoker more than a smoker. But it was to late, I was hooked again. I tryed quitting numerous times. My wife even started up again and she had also quit for 10 years. She is now struggling with the addiction and is not even trying at this time. I just know I did not quit the right way the last time and plan to do a better job of it this time. I want to set a good example for my wife and kids. I want to quit forever. I used to think about starting up again when I retire. Crazy thoughts because I know right after the first cig I would be tryng to quit again.

Dan, 8 day quit going now!
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

June 6th, 2002, 8:02 pm #27

I have a rather large clinic going this week and have not had a lot of time to cover the board. On the first night when I asked who in the group had past quits that had lasted a year or longer, probably about 20 people had raised their hands. When I started asking what were the lengths of time, we found four people who had quits lasting longer than 10 years. One was a thirteen year quit and one was a 20 year quit--all lost to taking a puff one day. I am not sure what is up with these two women, they were not at last nights meeting. This generally is not a good sign. It is imperative that every ex-smoker remembers to keep a quit going--for no matter how long a person quits for proving that he or she has the ability to quit and stay quit for appreciable period of times, there is no guarantee that if a person loses his or her quit that he or she will ever have the strength or ability to pull it off again. Stay focused on the fact that the only way to guarantee your ability to stay smoke free for a lifetime is always remembering to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: January 7th, 2009, 8:19 pm

June 6th, 2002, 8:10 pm #28

Hi Joel,
I've been rereading posts reaffirming my committment to not smoking. Having some ups and downs. As I read your post from this morning something occurred to me.

I've never tried to quit before. This is my first attempt. Now that I've gone through this (and it really hasn't been easy for me) I don't know if I'd be able to do it again. It has taken all of my resolve and strength to stay smokefree or should I say nicotene free for 27 days now. If I were to take a puff, I'm not sure I'd be able to do this again.

When I first quit I wondered how people could ever start smoking again once they had successfully quit for a period of time. I HAD NO IDEA WHAT THIS ADDICTION WAS REALLY LIKE.

It is absolutely frightening to know that we are so controlled by this substance. i can sure see now how easy it is to give in and have a smoke. Easier than fighting. Easier than staying quit. Easier than being patient and waiting out the withdrawal and adjustments. But, then that means we are slowly killing ourselves. How stupid to think that slowly killing yourself is easier than choosing to be healthy. SCARY.

I think for the first time i really understand what you mean by:

To stay free simply NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF.

Thanks Joel.
Ruth
27 days now
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:59 pm

June 27th, 2002, 11:10 pm #29

Joel, this is such a great thread! Chock-full of information. If it makes anyone a bit uncomfortable, then it's working! I saw myself in most of the posts.
I must say I've never truly quit before. My body has not been 100% nicotine-free since I was a teenager. My previous failures were all due to my ignorance of the law of addiction. I kept cigarettes around "just in case!" DUH!! So, of course, I smoked them, then bought more, "just in case." The last time I quit unsuccessfully was in March of this year, with my doctor's advice to take Wellbutrin (Zyban) and the nicotine inhaler (I just did the Wellbutrin). I kept a pack in the fridge and smoked one every night. One soon became two, then three, etc. etc. and even though I said after that pack I was done, I wasn't. The Wellbutrin had some unpleasant side effects and I stopped taking it, which in my junkie mind was the same as saying, oh well, might as well buy a carton. I found Freedom about a month into the relapse and smoked my last cigarette EVER on May 28, 2002. Yep, tomorrow I'll be GREEN! I can't wait to post that one tomorrow!
MareBear
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Joined: December 19th, 2008, 1:30 am

July 17th, 2002, 10:12 pm #30

My last and only previous quit was 8 years ago from Jan 1st 1994 - June 1994. 6 months of pure ****. How i held on i will never know! Awful cravings all day every day (or so it seemed) I remember thinking at 4 months quit that my god do the craves never end! On and on and on. Then i did find calmness, eventually. I got overconfident, I thought I had done it, i was a non smoker, hey I can now have a **** just when i go out for a drink, i will be a social smoker!!! 6 months quit down the drain! After one night of smoking, the next day i had 5 ****, three days later back to 30 a day again, how stupid. Hadn't got the balls to try again, until now 8 years later. And this quit is so much calmer, i am educating myself, and understanding that to keep your quit is a basic rule of never take another puff!
From Angie
One month, five days, 16 hours, 12 minutes and 35 seconds. 1070 cigarettes not smoked, saving £133.78. Life saved: 3 days, 17 hours, 10 minutes.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:58 pm

July 24th, 2002, 2:58 am #31

Thanks for keeping this post active! I know in my heart that had I been aware of this site BEFORE I blew a SEVEN YEAR QUIT, that it would now be a 15 year quit. Yep, that's right, I quit for seven years, ran like the wind, raced 6 and 10 mile races, was in the best shape of my life and then, NAIVELY believed that I could take just one puff from a friend of mine when we were out together. I literally puffed off her cigarette; didn't even light my own, that night. But you all know how this story ended, one puff led to a near pack a day cigarette habit and nary a quit attempt for seven years. Needless to say, running was inconsistent with my addict lifestyle so notwithstanding the fact that I loved it, I gave it up with not even a sideways glance.

It took me SEVEN long years to generate enough oumph to do this, and I know now that there is never going to be a safe level of tobacco usage for this addict.

Sam (18 days, 14 hours, 57 minutes into the fight for reclaiming my life).
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:58 pm

July 24th, 2002, 4:48 am #32

INTRODUCING interNATIONAL CHAMPION OF FAILED QUITS: OF FAILURES
25 years of smoking.

had one 3year quit
3 three months quit
Numerous 2 or 3 day quits.

2 or 3 years of a three cigarrettes a day So called quit.

Tried everything:
patches, inhalers, chewing gums, chew tobacco, acupucture, hypnosis, machine

cold turkeys, slow one: arrive seven times to a 1 cigarrette a day attempts and then relapse into my 20 cigarrettes a day Dies Irae.

can you beat me?

Juan
I have been Quit for: 1M 1W 5D 18h 25m 2s. I have NOT smoked 875, for a savings of $131.30. Life Saved: 3D 55m. This one will hold for today.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

August 12th, 2002, 6:29 pm #33

Do we have members who have lost quits in the past? Sure we do, here are my of them talking about it. But they know that things are different now--not because their current quits are longer than their past one, for they are clearly not. It is different now because they understand addiction this time around--they clearly know what they are fighting. They are not fighting a million cigarettes, a thousand, a case of cigarettes, a carton, a pack or even just one cigarette. They are fighting a puff and the battle line is drawn clearly in the sand for them. They could blow this quit whenever they want or they can stay successfully smoke free as long as they stay one hundred percent committed to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:59 pm

August 12th, 2002, 11:19 pm #34

Thanks for bringing this up Joel.

About 8 years ago I had quit for over a year and I "puffed it".

I started out on the patch, but after two weeks I quit using it. I worked out all the time. I hiked, biked, swam, did arobics videos, changed my eating habits etc, etc. I was truly a health freak. Over the course of a year I must of lost close to 50# and I wasn't smoking! I celebrated my anniversary of my quit with pride! Then about a week later . . . it happened.

You know, the usual story, out with friends, uneducated "quitter", overconfident, thought I could have "Just one" . . .

Well here I am again. This is my 3rd quit since Jan 1, 2000 but this time I have FREEDOM!! As long as I don't forget that I'm an ADDICT and I'm A PUFF AWAY FROM 30 A DAY, I'll be fine! That one puff terrifies me. I don't ever want to forget to
NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!

YQS
C
NOT A PUFF for 2W 5D 12h 40m 46s and counting. That's 585 cigarettes I didn't buy or smoke for a savings of $102.52.
ps. Could have been 8+ years if not for 1 little puff.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

August 12th, 2002, 11:37 pm #35

That is why this quit is going to be your last quit Cdnpheonix. As long as you recognize the addiction and its treatment you will succeed. When you treat and addiction as an addiction you will stay in control of it--its when you try to treat an addiction as a bad habit that you don't stand a prayer. To stay in control of the nicotine addiction is no m ore complicated than always remembering to never administer to your body nicotine via any source or simply stated for cigarettes to always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

November 10th, 2002, 6:15 am #36

Reply
Recommend Message 27 of 27 in Discussion
From: wcsdancer (Golden!) Sent: 11/9/2002 11:25 AM
Joel, just as I was kicking back enjoying my One Year of Freedom I had a wake up call. I visited one of my customers this week and while I was there she asked her son for a cigarettes. I said "I didn't know you smoked". She said "well I had quit 20 years ago and this old friend came to visit me and we had some giggles sharing a couple smokes. Ya know, I can't seem to stop buying them now...". That was a 20 YEAR QUIT THAT SHE LOST!!!! It's never, ever, ever, ever, OK to take another puff for us addicts. Did I stress NEVER!!!

*Candy* at one year but just a puff away from full blown active addiction (not gonna happen though)
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

December 4th, 2002, 7:13 pm #37

From: Diana2 (Original Message) Sent: 12/3/2002 9:10 PM
Hi all. I feel privileged to be a part of this board. I was very impressed with the amount of materials available, and have been drawing on them even before I quit. As a matter of fact, I was motivated to move up my quit date, so I could join sooner. November 26 was the date, and now I am nicotine free. I was feeling great until the last couple of days, been physically hurting, nerves on edge, crabby as can be. And I know this is normal, I just can't wait for it to go away. I know the physical part of the withdrawal is over, but what is it that I am feeling now, a week into my quit?

My history - I quit 14 years (wanted to have children) and did. And then one of my lovely kids became a teenager, and brought home cigarettes - and I had the junkie thinking, only one, what's the big deal, I quit all these years. So many aids today to help people quit. And here I sit, 6 years later, and several quit attempts later! It is a big deal. I never want to face withdrawal again. And I know that time does not make you exempt from the addiction. The only way to survive, is one day at a time, without ever taking even one puff!

So this is my mantra. I look forward to your support, as well as supporting you in your quits.

Diana
QD 11/26/02, 1 week, 1 day, 22 hours and counting!
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

June 20th, 2003, 6:29 pm #38

For our newer members who were not around when this one was first up, it would be good to go back to the first few screens and get the personal perspectives of the past losses suffered by our members before they new that to stay smoke free they must never take another puff! Joel
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

August 4th, 2003, 8:40 pm #39

Do we have members who have lost quits in the past? Sure we do, here are many of them talking about it. But they know that things are different now--not because their current quits are longer than their past one, for they are clearly not. It is different now because they understand addiction this time around--they clearly know what they are fighting. They are not fighting a million cigarettes, a thousand, a case of cigarettes, a carton, a pack or even just one cigarette. They are fighting a puff and the battle line is drawn clearly in the sand for them. They could blow this quit whenever they want or they can stay successfully smoke free as long as they stay one hundred percent committed to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

September 15th, 2003, 8:20 pm #40

Do we have members who have lost quits in the past? Sure we do, here are many of them talking about it. But they know that things are different now--not because their current quits are longer than their past one, for they are clearly not. It is different now because they understand addiction this time around--they clearly know what they are fighting. They are not fighting a million cigarettes, a thousand, a case of cigarettes, a carton, a pack or even just one cigarette. They are fighting a puff and the battle line is drawn clearly in the sand for them. They could blow this quit whenever they want or they can stay successfully smoke free as long as they stay one hundred percent committed to never take another puff!
Joel

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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

November 4th, 2003, 9:05 am #41

This is a good thread to go back to the beginning (hitting "First" in the lower left hand corner and reading all of the early responses.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:58 pm

November 5th, 2003, 12:19 am #42

I got hooked on dip and cigarettes in 1986, my senior year in high school, at age 18. (d'oh, if I'd only held out one more year, my statistical likelihood of ever starting would have rapidly tailed off to almost none -- that is one bad decision I made that year!). I became a nicotine addict in very short order, and was walking to the store in any weather to get my fix. I tried to quit cold turkey that summer, so I could start college a nonsmoker. Initiated cold turkey about two weeks before school started, and lasted about two more. I tried again in the summer of 1987, and made one more serious attempt in the school year itself). I put about 30 days together the summer of 1988, and again started a short time after my junior year began. Those three failed summer quits and the one serious attempt during school in 1987-88 represent the last four sustained periods of time my body was nicotine free before this quit, because the next serious quit attempt, in 1992, was when I substituted Nicorettes for cigarettes, and kept using them for the next eleven years (along with snuff and occasional "cheat" cigarettes and cigars). I think I used nicotine every day from that day forward, for eleven years. I put quitting in the "too hard to do box".

In short, I became an addict very early on in the process, as addicted then as I am today. I spent seventeen years and thousands of dollars administering nicotine to my body and brain, with three or four very short excruciating failed quits early on, because I didn't understand or accept the Law of Addiction. Finding this site has helped me not take a smoke or chew, or any nicotine at all, for 16 days, 19 hours, and change, and has given me the tools to keep my freedom as long as I remember that the Law of Addiction applies to me too, and I can never take another puff or chew.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:58 pm

December 2nd, 2003, 3:35 am #43

Thank you for bringing this thread back up to the front. What an eye-opener and also a memory-jogger!

I started smoking when I was in College--I had smoked very briefly when I was about 12 but lack of opportunity to continue and the fact that I really did NOT like them then kept me off them until I was about 21--my roommate started smoking and at first I bummed from him, then over the course of a couple of weeks started buying my own. This was in 1983. In 1985 my girlfriend asked me to quit and I did for app 3 months (quit #1). I had an auto accident in July of that year and started smoking again about 3 days after the accident. I smoked constantly from then until October 1986 when I moved back in with my parents (who did not know I smoked). I quit then (quit #2) which lasted about 2 weeks until I bummed one from a co-worker. I became something of a closet smoker around my family at this point.

The next time I really attempted to quit was in October 1992 when my fiancee asked me to quit (quit # 3). This quit lasted about 2 days and when it failed everyone was telling me "you're under too much other stress to add quitting smoking to your list right now" and even had co-workers telling me if I did NOT start smoking again on my own they were going to buy them and MAKE me start back. That quit would likely have failed anyway because my fiancee started smoing more heavily before we got married and then the marriage failed for other reasons before the honeymoon was even over good.

My next quit came in 1996 (quit #4). My dad had quit and so had my brother so now I was the only smoker in the family. This time I used the patch and followed the instructions to the letter. This was actually my longest quit. I used the patches for the prescribed 10 weeks then stopped and I felt great. I found that all of the things I used to do while smoking or using I could do "clean" and life was great. I married again and my 2nd wife even made the comment that she was so glad I did not smoke! That marriage failed shortly after it began but I did not even THINK about smoking again. What tipped me over the edge and caused me to lose my quit was the fact that my life basically fell apart in 1999, nearly 3 years after my last quit had started. I was in debt up to my eyeballs, my fiancee had dumped me, my job was going down the tubes. I bought a pack of cigarettes! Boy was I ever STUPID for doing that! It took a couple of weeks for things to settle down but eventually a gameplan was established for getting my life back on track but I continued to smoke.

My next quit came (Quit # 5) about 10 months later in 2000 and this time I used Wellbutrin. My wife (that same fiancee who had dumped me before took me back and we got married) wanted me to quit, my employer wanted me to quit and would pay for he drugs to do it, and I thought I wanted to quit. It lasted about 3 weeks and then I did something really stupid--bought a pack of cigarettes because I missed them! I was able to smoke that one pack and then put them down for another 3 weeks until the urge to smoke became overpowering--it was stronger than ever before and nothing I did could break me of it. Because I associated my wife wih this quit and my misery, I left her SO THAT I COULD SMOKE!

We reconciled but I still continued to smoke even though she wanted me to quit but she was nice and did not nag me too much. In January 2002 we went to a Church Revival and the evangelist said if you have an affliction you want removed put your hand on it and pray with me. I put my hand on my cigarette pack and prayed and found I did not want cigarettes any more. (Quit # 6). This lasted about 6 weeks until we decided to move and have our dog "fixed" at the same time. Something happened during or after the surgery and the dog died overnight at the vet's office. We were behind on what we needed to do to get our stuff out of the house to move and my wife just said "I can't handle it now, I just can't make myself do what needs to be done." With that stress I went and bought a pack of cigarettes and became a closet smoker for about 10 days and then it was out in the open.

This quit (quit #7) started on November 7, 2003 s a result of a conversation I had with a co-worker who also smoked and we both decided we were going to quit. She had all sorts of NRT stuff she was going to bring me but she also told me about this website called whyquit.com. She quit cold-turkey 4 days before I did, she gave me the NRT but said to read before I used it.

It is almost a month into this quit and I can truly say it has been the easiest of them all, thanks to the support and education I have received from Freedom! Thanks Joel, John, and all of the people responsible for making these sites and posts possible!

David - Free and Healing for Three weeks three Days, 5 Hours and 34 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 1 Day and 12 Hours 20 minutes, by avoiding the use of 436 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $32.75.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:58 pm

December 2nd, 2003, 4:59 am #44

This is a great thread. I started smoking when I was about 13. I smoked on and off through high school and settled for good in the Spring of 1996. I smoked a pack or two a day for the better part of college and my first year out. About a year and a half ago, summer '02, I quit for 7 weeks. I had a defeatist attitude and hated everything about that 7 weeks. My actual goal was to be able to quit long enough that I could become a "social smoker"! Now I realize that that is totally impossible for me, a drug addict. I guess I always knew that it was not possible but it was a prolonged stage of denial. Well, I went back to smoking by starting with one puff and then a week later back to smoking. Since then I was able to keep it under a pack a day..starting with 5 a day...then 10...then dangeroulsy close to 20 a day again. 2 weeks ago I decided I had had enough and this time I can genuinely say that I can see myself never smoking again because I'll never take another puff.

Jane
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:58 pm

December 2nd, 2003, 5:35 am #45

I posted my story above. I used to be a nicotine fiend, but because I have not ingested any nicotine -- for One Month, Fourteen Days and 58 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 1 Day and 23 Hours, by avoiding the use of 573 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $275.11,

I am free!

Edson
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