Why we must never take another puff

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 Apr 2002, 04:29 #21

A funny thing happened in my current clinic. Only one person had a really past longer term quit--6 years I think. Usually a high percentage of the group have these past experiences to learn from each other from. Thought this string would be beneficial to bring up for these people--as well as all the rest of the members.

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Apr 2002, 22:52 #22

For Probe:

I thought she may like to add her past experiences to this one.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Apr 2002, 08:33 #23

Image For Carolyn
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

16 May 2002, 19:41 #24

Image It was pretty interesting that in last night group, one man had once quit for 6 months, one woman for five days , one girl who was 17 had once tried to quit for two days, and one man who has smoked for 40 years had never tried to quit before. Normally in groups they get to witness more lost long-term quits to learn from--that did not happen here. So in the event that the four people read here, I am bringing up some post specific to this issue--that no matter how long a person is off they will lose their quit if they don't understand the bottom line law of addiction that to stay smoke free you must never take another puff!

Joel

Make sure to click here to see the original posts to this thread.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 May 2002, 06:56 #25

Image For Cando
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Cando (Green)
Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 20:43

21 May 2002, 21:35 #26

These posts are interesting. It is amazing how many different types quits and relapses happen.

I had a 10 year quit going up to about 2 years ago. During these 2 years of smoking I have been very depressed about my inability to quit again. I really screwed up because during my long quit, I always felt that eventually I would start up smoking again. It was my own stupid way of quitting. Telling myself that basically do yourself a favor and quit for a while because you can smoke later in life when your lungs have cleaned up. Really a pretty stupid way to quit and now I realize it is because I didn't take the time to learn about the addiction. I didn't realize how much I hated the control cigs had over me. Right after starting up again I realized that I like being a non-smoker more than a smoker. But it was to late, I was hooked again. I tryed quitting numerous times. My wife even started up again and she had also quit for 10 years. She is now struggling with the addiction and is not even trying at this time. I just know I did not quit the right way the last time and plan to do a better job of it this time. I want to set a good example for my wife and kids. I want to quit forever. I used to think about starting up again when I retire. Crazy thoughts because I know right after the first cig I would be tryng to quit again.

Dan, 8 day quit going now!
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Jun 2002, 20:02 #27

I have a rather large clinic going this week and have not had a lot of time to cover the board. On the first night when I asked who in the group had past quits that had lasted a year or longer, probably about 20 people had raised their hands. When I started asking what were the lengths of time, we found four people who had quits lasting longer than 10 years. One was a thirteen year quit and one was a 20 year quit--all lost to taking a puff one day. I am not sure what is up with these two women, they were not at last nights meeting. This generally is not a good sign. It is imperative that every ex-smoker remembers to keep a quit going--for no matter how long a person quits for proving that he or she has the ability to quit and stay quit for appreciable period of times, there is no guarantee that if a person loses his or her quit that he or she will ever have the strength or ability to pull it off again. Stay focused on the fact that the only way to guarantee your ability to stay smoke free for a lifetime is always remembering to never take another puff!

Joel
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blondie (green )
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 20:19

06 Jun 2002, 20:10 #28

Hi Joel,
I've been rereading posts reaffirming my committment to not smoking. Having some ups and downs. As I read your post from this morning something occurred to me.

I've never tried to quit before. This is my first attempt. Now that I've gone through this (and it really hasn't been easy for me) I don't know if I'd be able to do it again. It has taken all of my resolve and strength to stay smokefree or should I say nicotene free for 27 days now. If I were to take a puff, I'm not sure I'd be able to do this again.

When I first quit I wondered how people could ever start smoking again once they had successfully quit for a period of time. I HAD NO IDEA WHAT THIS ADDICTION WAS REALLY LIKE.

It is absolutely frightening to know that we are so controlled by this substance. i can sure see now how easy it is to give in and have a smoke. Easier than fighting. Easier than staying quit. Easier than being patient and waiting out the withdrawal and adjustments. But, then that means we are slowly killing ourselves. How stupid to think that slowly killing yourself is easier than choosing to be healthy. SCARY.

I think for the first time i really understand what you mean by:

To stay free simply NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF.

Thanks Joel.
Ruth
27 days now
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MareBear GOLD
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

27 Jun 2002, 23:10 #29

Joel, this is such a great thread! Chock-full of information. If it makes anyone a bit uncomfortable, then it's working! I saw myself in most of the posts. Image
I must say I've never truly quit before. My body has not been 100% nicotine-free since I was a teenager. My previous failures were all due to my ignorance of the law of addiction. I kept cigarettes around "just in case!" DUH!! So, of course, I smoked them, then bought more, "just in case." The last time I quit unsuccessfully was in March of this year, with my doctor's advice to take Wellbutrin (Zyban) and the nicotine inhaler (I just did the Wellbutrin). I kept a pack in the fridge and smoked one every night. One soon became two, then three, etc. etc. and even though I said after that pack I was done, I wasn't. The Wellbutrin had some unpleasant side effects and I stopped taking it, which in my junkie mind was the same as saying, oh well, might as well buy a carton. I found Freedom about a month into the relapse and smoked my last cigarette EVER on May 28, 2002. Yep, tomorrow I'll be GREEN! I can't wait to post that one tomorrow!
MareBearImage
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angieoo9
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 01:30

17 Jul 2002, 22:12 #30

My last and only previous quit was 8 years ago from Jan 1st 1994 - June 1994. 6 months of pure ****. How i held on i will never know! Awful cravings all day every day (or so it seemed) I remember thinking at 4 months quit that my god do the craves never end! On and on and on. Then i did find calmness, eventually. I got overconfident, I thought I had done it, i was a non smoker, hey I can now have a **** just when i go out for a drink, i will be a social smoker!!! 6 months quit down the drain! After one night of smoking, the next day i had 5 ****, three days later back to 30 a day again, how stupid. Hadn't got the balls to try again, until now 8 years later. And this quit is so much calmer, i am educating myself, and understanding that to keep your quit is a basic rule of never take another puff!
From Angie
One month, five days, 16 hours, 12 minutes and 35 seconds. 1070 cigarettes not smoked, saving £133.78. Life saved: 3 days, 17 hours, 10 minutes.
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