Who Should You Believe?

Joel
Joel

October 5th, 2003, 8:10 pm #1

Who should you believe on what is the most successful technique for quitting smoking-the government and most smoking cessation experts in the world and the professional health organizations of the world and the pharmacological industry and almost any one whose career seems to be based in smoking cessation or me? I guess using this standard it would be best not to believe me. But before jumping ship there is one other important group of people that you may find that will back me up and who are already quite credible to you. It's the people in your family and your friends in your real world who have successfully quit smoking and are off all nicotine products for at least one year or longer.

Find out how the people you know who are long-term ex-smokers actually stopped smoking. By long-term I mean people who are currently off all nicotine for at least a year or longer. You will see most of them never heard of me. You will see that many of them had previous quits that did not take, using all sorts of professional help and advice in those quits. You will find that the vast majority of these people (and I do mean the vast majority) did not follow what is considered the standard recommended advice or the how to quit guidelines by the world professionals on the quit that actually took and is still on going. They in fact most likely quit by stopping smoking one day for one reason or another and then have been able to stay off by still knowing at least to this point in time to never take a puff.

Talk to every long-term ex-smoker you know. Do your own surveys. While you are at it, talk to the current smokers you know too. See how many of them have used the products and followed the advice of the professionals. Try to find one of them who once had quit but are now smokers again who didn't take a puff. Finding one person like this is going to take you the rest of your life. Find out how many of the current smokers you know once had quit and actually had months, years or decades of not smoking behind them, only to lose those quits by following the advice of professionals who said things like, "Don't let a slip make you go back to smoking."

Pretty soon you will see it is not a matter of pitting me against the rest of the world professionals. It becomes a matter of pitting every long-term smoker you know who has successfully quit against the world professionals. Do the surveys and then I will just become another voice in the crowd of real people who have proven to you how to quit smoking and how to stay smoke free.

Below is a paragraph of a letter I sent to John in June of 2000:

"It's like seeing a published story come out that a specific pill prevents colds in 100% of the cases in human trials. Then another study verifies it. In fact, every expert in the world comes out and says colds no longer exist--the pill has eradicated them. But most people I knew who took this miracle pill still got colds. Worse than that, I took the pill myself and all my friends on the pill kept giving the cold to me. Pretty soon I would dismiss those studies and no matter how many times I see it I would not believe it. Sooner or later you have to believe your eyes, ears, basically, your own instincts more than expert opinion."

I guess I should point out one other fact that I could use in the defense of my views. I have seen people use the argument of who should they believe, me of the Surgeon General of the United States. I somehow get the idea that people think that the Surgeon General is a person who has gone through years and decades of working with nicotine addicts. That somehow being an expert in smoking cessation is a prerequisite of being the Surgeon General.

I have been running Stop Smoking Clinics since 1976. Back in 1976 I told my second group that they were nicotine addicts. If the people in my clinics were skeptical and wrote the Surgeon General at the time if it were true that nicotine is a drug addiction he would have said no it was not. It was clearly spelled out in the 1964 Surgeon General's Report that cigarette smoking was not an addiction. In the report of the Surgeon General back in 1979 the Surgeon General was starting to say that maybe it was an addiction, but still had put the emphasis on the habit of smoking being the primary problem. In 1988 the Surgeon General finally put out a report stating once and for all that nicotine was an addictive substance.

In all of the programs I did from 1976 through 1987 I was constantly criticized and attacked for saying that cigarette smokers were drug addicts. I was wrong all that time because the Surgeon General said I was wrong. But today I am no longer wrong on this fact.

So I think I am going to just take a wait and see attitude on what the Surgeon General ten years from now or twenty years from now will say is the most effective way to quit smoking. Maybe he or she will have come around to my way of thinking by then, maybe not. But I know one thing for sure. That all of the people who decided to go along with my way of thinking, and follow my advice on how to quit, and then stay committed in the interim to the advice that I have given them to remain smoke free, that they will all still be ex-smokers. Considering my advice that still seems to be controversial today is simply that to quit smoking and stay smoke free is no more complicated than just knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

October 5th, 2003, 8:23 pm #2

The three most common stories you will hear of how long-term quitters actually quit smoking:
  1. The woke up one day and realized they were sick and tired of smoking and never touched one since.
  2. They got sick. Not smoking sick, just sick--often just a cold or a flu. They felt miserable, didn't feel like eating or smoking. In a few days the infection subsided and they stated to get better. They realized that they had a few days under their belts without smoking and decided to keep the quit going and never went back.
  3. They left their doctor's office with an ultimatum--quit smoking or your going to drop dead--your choice!
You will be amazed at just how many people who are long-term ex-smokers fit into one of these three categories. The technique to quit for all three of these groups are the same, it is just that their initial motivations for quitting varied. It is the same technique being used by every member here, which is simply to have quit smoking and then sticking to the commitment they have made when joining up to never take another puff!

Joel
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

November 20th, 2003, 6:47 pm #3

Quote
Share

Michelle72482
Michelle72482

November 21st, 2003, 2:27 pm #4

Joel, I think what you do is an awesome and caring thing. To never have smoked yourself, but yet help those who do, quit is a remarkable and selfless thing.....Thank you.
Quote
Share

ChristinenSam
ChristinenSam

November 21st, 2003, 3:04 pm #5

Joel, thanks for bringing up this post. And I agree with Michelle - you are wonderful for all the work you do for nicotine cessation.

The thing that really made me know that what you say is right, is that you totally and completely seem to be able to elaborate on how I felt, what I thought, etc even though you don't smoke and were not ever addicted to nicotine. How could you know? You are right .

Christine
Quote
Share

Joanne Gold
Joanne Gold

November 23rd, 2003, 5:28 pm #6

Quote
Share

Joanne Gold
Joanne Gold

November 25th, 2003, 6:01 pm #7

New Message on Freedom From Tobacco - Quit Smoking Now
Who Should You Believe?
[url=mailto:FreedomFromTobaccoQuitSmokingNow@groups.msn.com?subject=Re%3A%20Who%20Should%20You%20Believe%3F]Reply[/url]
[url=mailto:joanne@whyquit.com?subject=Re%3A%20Who%20Should%20You%20Believe%3F]Reply to Sender[/url] Recommend Message 6 in Discussion
From: Joanne - Gold

View other groups in this category.
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

November 26th, 2003, 9:54 pm #8

Do your own survey.
Trust your ears and eyes.

Psychological conditioning isn't just a by-product of an addictive chemical's half-life, it's also used in marketing to get us to believe and buy.

The tobacco industry wants you to believe that smoking nicotine is an adult choice issue while ignoring the fact that true chemical addiction means that the only choice the addict has is chemical withdrawal or that next mandatory smoke.

The pharmaceutical industry is spending a massive amount of money to condition smokers to believe that buying more nicotine is the answer to all our problems.

Athough I've tried hard to get nicotine addicts to actually read the latest NRT studies and reflect upon the disasterous relapse rates for themselves (numeric relapse rates in excess of 93% at six months that those pushing nicotine will continue to refuse to discuss), as Joel points out there is a much easier way to discover the truth.

The world's most brilliant marketing minds may be able to package relapse as victory but the proofs in the pudding. Trust in those you know or love to be a bit more honest with you than those trying to profit off of your addiciton.

Although the NRT industry has done an amazing job of successfully erasing almost all cold turkey quitting recommendations in cessation literature around the globe, they cannot erase the fact that all but a tiny sliver of those becoming free from all forms of nicotine are doing so by deciding to not put any more nicotine into their bodies.
Freedom should cost you nothing!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long! John
Quote
Share

Rickgoldx5
Rickgoldx5

November 26th, 2003, 11:59 pm #9

Joel,
Funny I was thinking about this yesterday. After I joined Freedom maybe about a week , my M.D said I might want to try a quit smoking class they had at thier clinic.
I went the next day thinking it might help. Wrong! I was the only one out of 20 people quitting cold turkey. All they did was sit around this table and whine about everything in general. I never went back. But I got to thinking of all my friends that quit. Only one out of 5 used N.R.T. and she started smoking again a month later. I can't imagine how miserable thats got to be. To be in constant withdrawls for months!
Thank for showing me my way to Freedom!
Rick
One year, six months, three weeks, one day, 2 hours, 43 minutes and 38 seconds. 45689 cigarettes not smoked, saving $11,400.25. Life saved: 22 weeks, 4 days, 15 hours, 25 minutes.
Quote
Share

Joanne Gold
Joanne Gold

November 27th, 2003, 11:27 am #10

New Message on Freedom From Tobacco - Quit Smoking Now
Who Should You Believe?
[url=mailto:FreedomFromTobaccoQuitSmokingNow@groups.msn.com?subject=Re%3A%20Who%20Should%20You%20Believe%3F]Reply[/url]
[url=mailto:joanne@whyquit.com?subject=Re%3A%20Who%20Should%20You%20Believe%3F]Reply to Sender[/url] Recommend Message 6 in Discussion
From: Joanne - Gold

View other groups in this category.
Quote
Share

TOM DPLN1 GOLD
TOM DPLN1 GOLD

April 10th, 2004, 3:44 am #11

ONE OF THE FIRST POSTS I READ AS A NEWBIE. IT PUSHED ME
OVER THE EDGE TO QUIT COLD TURKEY. I QUIT THE DAY I READ
THIS. HOPE EVERONE ELSE FIND THIS AS THOUGHT PROVOKING
AS I DID.
Quote
Share

carvoiero gold
carvoiero gold

April 10th, 2004, 6:38 am #12

This is a good post
- I came to this site because I just stopped smoking and was looking for a support site and someone at another site suggested whyquit.com because I had expressed my views on NRT and cold turkey (these have always been completely in line with Joel's). It was the best thing I could have done - the idea of NTAP, no 'slips' allowed etc was just what I needed to keep the quit strong this time - for the last time. If I NTAP then I can never become a smoker again! Simple. I probably should have known that already, but my junkie mind wouldn't let me register it before!
Thank you Joel for doing all you can to help nicotine addicts like myself.
Marion
Quote
Share

Fong KK
Fong KK

April 10th, 2004, 12:50 pm #13

When I started my quit, I was lurking at AS3 newsgroup looking for an effective quit method and also hoping to find any kind of support I can get. I wasn't sure Cold Turkey is the way to go but I already started it. The discussions at AS3 were mixture of quit methods and that doesn't give me much confidence in my quitting cold turkey. I was at the same time looking for a quit meter to help keep track of my quit. Then I came across a post by a Robin that suggests whyquit.com for a link to get a quit meter. It was from then on that I stayed on with Freedom.

I am confident now that cold turkey is the way to go and the education I get from Freedom is fantastic !. This is the excellent post that reinforced my quit . Thanks Joel.

Fong

4 Weeks, 22 hours, 55 minutes and 26 seconds. 868 Cigarettes not smoked, saving $173.72. Life saved : 3 Days and 20 minutes
Quote
Share

screechwinter
screechwinter

May 30th, 2004, 11:47 pm #14

yeah. this just about says it all.

ahnaka
One month, two weeks, five days, 12 hours, 16 minutes and 45 seconds. 742 cigarettes not smoked, saving $194.95. Life saved: 2 days, 13 hours, 50 minutes.
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

May 31st, 2004, 1:19 am #15

Should you believe ...
the pharmaceutical industry?

Talking about believing! Here are ten things that pharmaceutical industry does not want smokers to know about nicotine replacement therapy (NRT):
  1. Cold turkey quitters were NOT invited to compete NRT quitters in NRT studies as insinuated in NRT commercials
  2. NRT studies were not double-blind as claimed. Instead they suffered from massive wide-spread blinding failures
  3. Your natural six-month odds of quitting without any education programs, counseling or formal support is about 10%
  4. Only 7% of those using over-the-counter (OTC) NRT as a stand-alone quitting aid are still not smoking at six months
  5. 7% of OTC nicotine gum quitters are still chewing nicotine gum at six months
  6. 36.6% of all current nicotine gum users are chronic long-term users of greater than six months
  7. Almost 100% of second-time nicotine patch users relapse with six months
  8. 91.2% of successful long-term ex-smokers quit entirely on their own without any product, procedure or program
  9. Education, understanding, new skills and serious support can more than triple your natural 10 odds
  10. Just one day at a time not putting any nicotine into your body 100% guarantees success to every quitter!

Quote
Share

GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

July 2nd, 2004, 11:46 pm #16

Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

August 5th, 2004, 7:15 pm #17

The three most common stories you will hear of how long-term quitters actually quit smoking:
  1. The woke up one day and realized they were sick and tired of smoking and never touched one since.
  2. They got sick. Not smoking sick, just sick--often just a cold or a flu. They felt miserable, didn't feel like eating or smoking. In a few days the infection subsided and they stated to get better. They realized that they had a few days under their belts without smoking and decided to keep the quit going and never went back.
  3. They left their doctor's office with an ultimatum--quit smoking or your going to drop dead--your choice!
You will be amazed at just how many people who are long-term ex-smokers fit into one of these three categories. The technique to quit for all three of these groups are the same, it is just that their initial motivations for quitting varied. It is the same technique being used by every member here, which is simply to have quit smoking and then sticking to the commitment they have made when joining up to never take another puff!

Joel
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

October 4th, 2004, 7:25 pm #18

As this article discusses, I am a big advocate of people doing their own personal surveys to get an idea of how most people they personally know succeed at quitting.
Quote
Share

Ouija7
Ouija7

October 6th, 2004, 12:49 pm #19

Quit cold turkey !!!

100% of the long term smokers I know quit cold turkey. 11 out of 11 people! I do find it amazing that it took Joel to point this out to me. I am forever greatful! Including my own quit makes 12 out of 12.

Ouija7- 4 days from Gold!
Quote
Share

Joanne Gold
Joanne Gold

October 15th, 2004, 12:34 am #20

For Ann....
Quote
Share

Ann
Ann

October 15th, 2004, 1:13 am #21

Thanks. I do believe cold turkey is the way to go--most of the long-term ex-smokers I know did actually use additional non-NRT techniques--but I'm happy with Freedom. (In both senses of the word)
Quote
Share

TOM DPLN1 GOLD
TOM DPLN1 GOLD

January 5th, 2005, 3:27 am #22

Quote
Share

Alyson GOLD.ffn
Alyson GOLD.ffn

January 7th, 2005, 4:18 am #23

For Sue.
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

February 4th, 2005, 10:14 pm #24

In case any one finds their way to Freedom today because of the segment on CBS (Okay, I know it is not much of a chance but a chance none-the-less), I thought it would be good to have some follow-up comments about problems with the state of the art approaches currently being endorsed for smoking cessation:
The three most common stories you will hear of how long-term quitters actually quit smoking:
  1. The woke up one day and realized they were sick and tired of smoking and never touched one since.
  2. They got sick. Not smoking sick, just sick--often just a cold or a flu. They felt miserable, didn't feel like eating or smoking. In a few days the infection subsided and they stated to get better. They realized that they had a few days under their belts without smoking and decided to keep the quit going and never went back.
  3. They left their doctor's office with an ultimatum--quit smoking or your going to drop dead--your choice!
You will be amazed at just how many people who are long-term ex-smokers fit into one of these three categories. The technique to quit for all three of these groups are the same, it is just that their initial motivations for quitting varied. It is the same technique being used by every member here, which is simply to have quit smoking and then sticking to the commitment they have made when joining up to never take another puff!

Joel

Quote
Share

Starshinegrl Gold
Starshinegrl Gold

March 8th, 2006, 7:28 pm #25

Quote
Share