Who Should You Believe?

John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

31 May 2004, 01:19 #11

Should you believe ...
the pharmaceutical industry?

Talking about believing! Here are ten things that pharmaceutical industry does not want smokers to know about nicotine replacement therapy (NRT):
  1. Cold turkey quitters were NOT invited to compete NRT quitters in NRT studies as insinuated in NRT commercials
  2. NRT studies were not double-blind as claimed. Instead they suffered from massive wide-spread blinding failures
  3. Your natural six-month odds of quitting without any education programs, counseling or formal support is about 10%
  4. Only 7% of those using over-the-counter (OTC) NRT as a stand-alone quitting aid are still not smoking at six months
  5. 7% of OTC nicotine gum quitters are still chewing nicotine gum at six months
  6. 36.6% of all current nicotine gum users are chronic long-term users of greater than six months
  7. Almost 100% of second-time nicotine patch users relapse with six months
  8. 91.2% of successful long-term ex-smokers quit entirely on their own without any product, procedure or program
  9. Education, understanding, new skills and serious support can more than triple your natural 10 odds
  10. Just one day at a time not putting any nicotine into your body 100% guarantees success to every quitter!

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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Aug 2004, 19:15 #12

The three most common stories you will hear of how long-term quitters actually quit smoking:
  1. The woke up one day and realized they were sick and tired of smoking and never touched one since.
  2. They got sick. Not smoking sick, just sick--often just a cold or a flu. They felt miserable, didn't feel like eating or smoking. In a few days the infection subsided and they stated to get better. They realized that they had a few days under their belts without smoking and decided to keep the quit going and never went back.
  3. They left their doctor's office with an ultimatum--quit smoking or your going to drop dead--your choice!
You will be amazed at just how many people who are long-term ex-smokers fit into one of these three categories. The technique to quit for all three of these groups are the same, it is just that their initial motivations for quitting varied. It is the same technique being used by every member here, which is simply to have quit smoking and then sticking to the commitment they have made when joining up to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Oct 2004, 19:25 #13

As this article discusses, I am a big advocate of people doing their own personal surveys to get an idea of how most people they personally know succeed at quitting.
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Ouija7
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:58

06 Oct 2004, 12:49 #14

Quit cold turkey !!!

100% of the long term smokers I know quit cold turkey. 11 out of 11 people! I do find it amazing that it took Joel to point this out to me. I am forever greatful! Including my own quit makes 12 out of 12.

Ouija7- 4 days from Gold!
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

20 Apr 2006, 10:31 #15

Image
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suannu153
Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 00:19

27 Apr 2006, 04:14 #16

All those I have known who have quit successfully for much more than any 6 months have been those who have quit cold turkey. From throwing up after the first cigarette in the morning and the packet then hit the bin to ripping the NRT patch off in hospital and going cold turkey in hospital; all are successful long term quitters.
I know but 1 case of someone using NRT to quit but she had counselling to go alongside her quit, the rest manage a week and are often smoking with the patches on!!

Susan


---
3weeks 15:43 smoke-free, 437 cigs not smoked,
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

12 Jul 2006, 19:41 #17

I thought it would probably be a good idea to pop this one up this week. I suspect with the 13th World Conference on Smoking going on this week there will likely be lots of press releases coming out on how all of the world experts are touting the great success that could be achieved if people would just buy quit smoking medications. There will probably be no mention the the fact that most people who have quit have done so by simply quitting and that all people can successfully stay off if they simply make and stick to a personal commitment to never take another puff.

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

10 Aug 2006, 23:09 #18

The three most common stories you will hear of how long-term quitters actually quit smoking:

1. The woke up one day and realized they were sick and tired of smoking and never touched one since.

2. They got sick. Not smoking sick, just sick--often just a cold or a flu. They felt miserable, didn't feel like eating or smoking. In a few days the infection subsided and they stated to get better. They realized that they had a few days under their belts without smoking and decided to keep the quit going and never went back.

3. They left their doctor's office with an ultimatum--quit smoking or your going to drop dead--your choice!

You will be amazed at just how many people who are long-term ex-smokers fit into one of these three categories. The technique to quit for all three of these groups are the same, it is just that their initial motivations for quitting varied.

It is the same technique being used by every member here, which is simply to have quit smoking and then sticking to the commitment they have made when joining up to never take another puff!

Joel
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

12 Jan 2007, 19:35 #19

I saw where a member noted that today was the anniversary of the 1964 Surgeon General's report on Smoking and Health. Actually, January 11, 1964 was another landmark day for Luther Terry who was the Surgeon General who released the report. It was the day he himself actually quit smoking. Here are two videos that discuss Luther Terry's role in that report:
Video Title
Dial-Up
HS/BB
Length
Added
Addiction - the Surgeon General says ... 4.42mb 13.2mb 12:00 10/09/06
Criteria of Addiction 4.09mb 12.2mb 11:06 10/09/06
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

12 Jan 2007, 19:55 #20

According to an article in the NIH Record, the biweekly newsletter for
employees of the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Luther Terry was a
smoker and he quit smoking in 1964.

Excerpt:

"Back in 1964, Dr. Luther Terry, then U.S. surgeon general, was
understandably a bit nervous. He was about to release the first-ever
Surgeon General's Report, which confirmed several long-suspected
theories regarding the detrimental effect of smoking on health. As he
was riding to the news conference, thinking about what he would say,
he lit up a cigarette. Noting the cigarette, an adviser, who knew
Terry was a chronic smoker, suggested that the surgeon general be
prepared for the first question reporters were certain to ask: Do you
smoke, Dr. Terry? Terry could not believe reporters would be
interested in his personal habits. Sure enough, though, following
Terry's announcement of the landmark SG report and his comments about
the health dangers of smoking, a savvy reporter asked Terry if he
smoked. "No," Terry replied. The reporter - convinced he had done his
homework - double-checked his notes. Knowing Terry's history, the
writer pressed further, "Dr. Terry, when did you quit?" A smiling
Terry responded, "About 30 minutes ago." He never smoked again."

Source:
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
NIH Record from April 17, 2001
http://www.nih.gov/news/NIH-Record/04_17_2001/main.htm
http://www.nih.gov/news/NIH-Record/04_1 ... tory02.htm
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