Who Should You Believe?

Who Should You Believe?

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 Dec 2003, 06:42 #1

Joel's Reinforcement Library

Image



Quitting Methods - Who to Believe?



Who should you believe on what is the most successful technique for quitting smoking - the government and most smoking cessation experts in the world and the professional health organizations of the world and the pharmacological industry and almost anyone whose career seems to be based in smoking cessation or me?
I guess using this standard it would be best not to believe me. But before jumping ship there is one other important group of people that you may find that will back me up and who are already quite credible to you. It's the people in your family and your friends in your real world who have successfully quit smoking and been off all nicotine products for at least one year or longer.

Find out how the people you know who are long-term ex-smokers actually stopped smoking. By long-term I mean people who are currently off all nicotine for at least a year or longer. You'll likely find that few if any of them have ever heard of me. You will see that many of them had previous quits and relapsed, using all sorts of methods that are endorsed by professionals and maybe even a few of them had professional help with previous attempts. You will find that almost all of them did not follow what is considered the standard recommended advice on how to quit yet they did quit and are still going strong. You'll find that they most likely quit by simply stopping smoking one day for one reason or another and then have been able to stay off by sticking to a commitment that they made to themselves to not take a puff.

Talk to every long-term ex-smoker you know. Do your own surveys. While you are at it, talk to the current smokers you know too. See how many of them have used products and followed the advice of the professionals. Keep in mind, most professional literature will advise people to use pharmacologic aids like nicotine replacement products. Try to see how many long-term successful quitters in your real world encounters actually followed this advice.

Another piece of advice written in most literature produced by smoking cessation experts is something to the effect that temporary slips are common and that you should not let a slip put you back to smoking. People who write advice like this do not understand addiction. A person needs to understand that taking a puff is likely going to kill a quit.

Try to find one smoker who once had quit but are now smokers again who didn't one day take a puff. Finding one such person who fits this criteria is going to take you forever. On the other hand finding current smokers you know who had once had quits that actually lasted for months, years or decades who lost their quits by taking that first puff are quite easy to find. Understand, some of these people had heard comments like, "don't let a slip make you go back to smoking," but sadly, found out from experience that they had little control of the matter once they took that puff.

Our advice if to successfully quit smoking is to simply stop smoking. Our advice for staying off cigarettes is simply to stick to a commitment to never take another puff. So talk to long-term ex-smokers and find out how they quit and hear how they have managed to stay off. Pretty soon you will see it is not a matter of pitting all of the world professionals against me. It becomes a matter of pitting every long-term ex-smoker you know who has successfully quit against the world's professionals. Do the surveys and then I will just become another voice in the crowd of real people who have proven to you that they way to quit smoking and to stay smoke free is to never take another puff!



Last edited by Joel on 01 Apr 2012, 12:37, edited 2 times in total.
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 Dec 2003, 06:47 #2

We've edited the original post of this string. I am attaching the comments generated from that post below. There were some posts I am deleting for they where just thumbs up popping them to the top.

[/size]Reply Message 2 of 10 in Discussion From: JoelSent: 10/5/2003 7:23 AM


The three most common stories you will hear of how long-term quitters actually quit smoking:

  1. The woke up one day and realized they were sick and tired of smoking and never touched one since.
  2. They got sick. Not smoking sick, just sick--often just a cold or a flu. They felt miserable, didn't feel like eating or smoking. In a few days the infection subsided and they stated to get better. They realized that they had a few days under their belts without smoking and decided to keep the quit going and never went back.
  3. They left their doctor's office with an ultimatum--quit smoking or your going to drop dead--your choice!
You will be amazed at just how many people who are long-term ex-smokers fit into one of these three categories. The technique to quit for all three of these groups are the same, it is just that their initial motivations for quitting varied. It is the same technique being used by every member here, which is simply to have quit smoking and then sticking to the commitment they have made when joining up to never take another puff!

Joel

Reply - Message 4 of 10 in Discussion       From: Michelle72482      Sent: 11/21/2003 12:27 AM


Joel, I think what you do is an awesome and caring thing. To never have smoked yourself, but yet help those who do, quit is a remarkable and selfless thing.....Thank you.








Reply Message 5 of 10 in Discussion           From: ChristinenSam       Sent: 11/21/2003 1:04 AM
Joel, thanks for bringing up this post. And I agree with Michelle - you are wonderful for all the work you do for nicotine cessation.

The thing that really made me know that what you say is right, is that you totally and completely seem to be able to elaborate on how I felt, what I thought, etc even though you don't smoke and were not ever addicted to nicotine. How could you know? You are right Image.

Christine




Reply Message 8 of 10 in Discussion          From: John (Gold)           Sent: 11/26/2003 7:54 AM
Do your own survey. Trust your ears and eyes.



Psychological conditioning isn't just a by-product of an addictive chemical's half-life, it's also used in marketing to get us to believe and buy.





The tobacco industry wants you to believe that smoking nicotine is an adult choice issue while ignoring the fact that true chemical addiction means that the only choice the addict has is chemical withdrawal or that next mandatory smoke.





The pharmaceutical industry is spending a massive amount of money to condition smokers to believe that buying more nicotine is the answer to all our problems.





Athough I've tried hard to get nicotine addicts to actually read the latest NRT studies and reflect upon the disasterous relapse rates for themselves (numeric relapse rates in excess of 93% at six months that those pushing nicotine will continue to refuse to discuss), as Joel points out there is a much easier way to discover the truth.





The world's most brilliant marketing minds may be able to package relapse as victory but the proofs in the pudding. Trust in those you know or love to be a bit more honest with you than those trying to profit off of your addiciton.





Although the NRT industry has done an amazing job of successfully erasing almost all cold turkey quitting recommendations in cessation literature around the globe, they cannot erase the fact that all but a tiny sliver of those becoming free from all forms of nicotine are doing so by deciding to not put any more nicotine into their bodies.




Freedom should cost you nothing!


Breathe deep, hug hard, live long!  John


Reply - Message   9 of 10 in Discussion -         From jackrabit50GOLD           Sent: 11/26/2003 9:59 AM Joel,

Funny I was thinking about this yesterday. After I joined Freedom maybe about a week , my M.D said I might want to try a quit smoking class they had at thier clinic.

I went the next day thinking it might help. Wrong! I was the only one out of 20 people quitting cold turkey. All they did was sit around this table and whine about everything in general. I never went back. But I got to thinking of all my friends that quit. Only one out of 5 used N.R.T. and she started smoking again a month later. I can't imagine how miserable thats got to be. To be in constant withdrawls for months!

Thank for showing me my way to Freedom!

Rick

One year, six months, three weeks, one day, 2 hours, 43 minutes and 38 seconds. 45689 cigarettes not smoked, saving $11,400.25. Life saved: 22 weeks, 4 days, 15 hours, 25 minutes.
Last edited by Joel on 26 Apr 2011, 11:29, edited 2 times in total.
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 Feb 2004, 23:17 #3

I saw a comment written somewhere today about a how a new member was following my approach to quitting. I think that it is important to note that cold turkey quitting is not my technique. Cold turkey quitting has been around as long as quitting has been around and is the way most people have quit smoking. The vast majority of people who have successfully quit in the world throughout history did so by going cold turkey and they had absolutely no knowledge of me.

I may be one of the more outspoken advocates of cold turkey quitting but cold turkey quitting is a technique that has been around for as long as quitting has been around. I guess I should point out that the relapse prevention strategy I advocate is not mine either. It too has been used by countless successful ex-smokers for many decades now--people who figured out or instinctively knew on their own that to stay smoke free they had to stay totally committed to never take another puff!

Joel
Reply

DlunyGOLD
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

24 Feb 2004, 15:26 #4

I was in the grocery store last night and heard an ad over the PA system for some NRT product. All I could think of was a line I have read somewhere here--"the biggest reason no one wants to jump on the cold turkey bandwagon is there is no money in it!"

After I said that to myself a couple of times I was able to go back to my shopping. John makes a good point about "The world's most brilliant marketing minds may be able to package relapse as victory but the proofs in the pudding." However, if they can repackage relapse can't they also repackage the pudding? Aren't they already trying to do so with all of their bogus claims of "double your chances" and other such claims?

Sounds like the best thing we can do for our sanity is to just remember to never take another puff one day at a time, spread the word about this site as much as possible, and welcome those people who do ultimately come here for help! We can make a difference!

yqb, David Three months, two weeks, two days, 17 hours, 25 minutes and 47 seconds. 1957 cigarettes not smoked, saving $146.78. Life saved: 6 days, 19 hours, 5 minutes.
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 Oct 2005, 05:44 #5

There are many people at other sites who feel that if their members come our direction and accept our views that they are going to be at greater risk of losing their quits. There are many at other sites who are infuriated when members of their sites come to www.whyquit.com or Freedom, read our views of the limitations of NRT and then decide to quit their NRT.

The members of these other sites often write on how they know many people who lost their quits because they read at our site and then decided to come off NRT too soon--no matter how long the person may have been on it. These people seem to be working with the impression that stopping the intake of nicotine caused these people to relapse. We see it quite differently.

Those people who relapsed did not do so because they stopped taking nicotine--they relapsed because they took in nicotine one more time after they stopped their use of NRT--or in other words they took a puff on a cigarette. No one relapses back on smoking without taking a puff and that is an act that each and every individual is responsible for. People who succeed forever do so because they didn't take a puff--people who relapse do so because they did. This is a universal truth that applies to all people no matter how they quit and no matter what groups they do or don't belong to.

From the string Reading at other quit smoking sites
Last edited by Joel on 16 Feb 2010, 11:57, edited 1 time in total.
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Nov 2005, 18:15 #6

I am starting to see where cold turkey quitting is starting to get bashed pretty heavily in the media. One of the techniques that is being used is having smoking experts come out and say that while everyone seems to know one person who has quit cold turkey, that most people just cannot quit this way. They are trying now to undercut the real world examples that people are inevitably exposed to since since this is the way that most people have successfully quit smoking. I would agree that if a person just seemed to know only one person who had successfully quit smoking by a certain technique, it would be a clear sign that maybe the technique was not very successful. The issue is that if people go through the trouble of finding out what technique was used by ALL of the people they know who had quit smoking, they would most likely find that most if not all of them were in fact cold turkey quitters.



Here is the standard commentary I use when addressing the issue of talking to ex-smokers: I really do encourage all people to take this survey, talking to long-term ex-smokers in their real world. People who you knew when they were smokers, who you knew when they were quitting and who you still know as being successful long-term ex-smokers. The more people you talk to the more obvious it will become how people quit smoking and how people stay off of smoking. Again, people quit smoking by simply quitting smoking and people stay off of smoking by simply knowing that to stay smoke free that they must never take another puff!

Again, go talk to as many long-term successful ex-smokers (people off all forms of nicotine for at least a year or longer) in your real world that you can find and find out how they quit. I don't believe that there is a single professional smoking cessation NRT advocate who will suggest to their patients that they take a similar survey. For if they did their credibility would be called into question almost immediately when the patient starting seeing the results of their real life survey.
Reply

Sal GOLD.ffn
Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

05 Feb 2006, 10:11 #7

From: Joel Sent: 10/5/2003 7:23 AM
The three most common stories you will hear of how long-term quitters actually quit smoking:
  1. The woke up one day and realized they were sick and tired of smoking and never touched one since.
  2. They got sick. Not smoking sick, just sick--often just a cold or a flu. They felt miserable, didn't feel like eating or smoking. In a few days the infection subsided and they stated to get better. They realized that they had a few days under their belts without smoking and decided to keep the quit going and never went back.
  3. They left their doctor's office with an ultimatum--quit smoking or your going to drop dead--your choice!
You will be amazed at just how many people who are long-term ex-smokers fit into one of these three categories. The technique to quit for all three of these groups are the same, it is just that their initial motivations for quitting varied. It is the same technique being used by every member here, which is simply to have quit smoking and then sticking to the commitment they have made when joining up to never take another puff!

Joel
Reply

LeoEx Smoker
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Feb 2006, 15:07 #8

Hiya,

I've been really revved up about this NRT issue. Today I got on radio (well, kinda snuck on really Image) - the ABC in one state of Australia. It was talkback on New Year's Resolutions. So I called in and said that I'd quit cold turkey, it was easier than I thought, and (talking very quickly) that despite the marketing saying that NRT doubled my chances, in reality it more than halves it.

Every week I'm going to do something like this. I'm going to write or email someone, some government body, some newspaper, some TV show, some research organisation, and just ask questions. One day, someone is going to listen, and if lots of ex-smokers do it, then change can happen. I know that sounds a bit naff and idealistic but I genuinely believe that. Image Public health issues like this - like smoking and the tobacco companies, and asbestos - it's the little guys who end up shouting so loud that someone in power, one day, goes 'HARK! I HEAR THE RESOUNDING WHISPER OF A CLASS ACTION! and bingo, suddenly people with money start to take notice and change what their companies are doing.

Also I think it's vital that we give back. Joel and you managers and John and oldbies - you are all in here giving to us newbies 24/7. You are Quit Angels. I don't know that I'll ever be that good at encouraging other individuals along their quits. But I know that I can help out by getting the word out in general about NRT. I 'll just start with Australia, this year.

hehehehehe

Leonie

Leo - Free and Healing for One Month, Three Days, 7 Hours and 43 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 4 Days and 4 Hours, by avoiding the use of 1201 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $529.30.
Reply

nicoGerm
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:32

06 Feb 2006, 17:00 #9

I gotta admit that cold turkey is the only way to go... BUT...

I'm a rookie. I'm 25 days into my quit and I know I'm strong. Tonight, I drank myself silly surrounded by smokers and never once thought to take a puff. I couldn't be happier. I still can't help but think that someday, I may be able to balance nicotine the way I do everything else in my life...

I drink once a week, why is it impossible to think that I couldn't smoke once a week too?

I'm an addict. I know that. Now, next year, the year after, I can't smoke. I won't smoke, that I promise myself. Never? I can't answer that question right now. Scratch that... I won't answer that right now.

-NG

nicoGerm - Free and Healing for Twenty Five Days, 3 Hours and 28 Minutes
Reply