Who's to Blame?

Who's to Blame?

JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 Oct 2006, 01:28 #1

Why did you continue to smoke tobacco cigarettes, cigars, in pipes, with or without filters?
Didn't you have access to the news reports being broadcast for the last 30+ years that this activity is dangerous, life threatening, has the potential to kill you?
I suppose you didn't believe they were talking about you?

Yeah, me neither.




It seems that in our impatient, impersonal modern culture and society we have a common belief that whatever is happening to us it is not our fault. Somebody else must be held accountable. Someone's forced misery upon us against our will. Someone or something else, an outside agency if you will, is to blame. It is a form of denial called blame transference and it is widespread.



Blame transference Denial[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF] [/font]and other rationalization techniques are part of the drug user's arsenal that helps explain their self-destructive behaviors. We have lied to ourselves and been fed lies about tobacco smoking by others for so long we have made them part of our belief systems.



False Associations , Junkie Thinking , industry advertising, ideas like 'If cigarettes were as deadly as you say they are...' only make it easier to believe the lies we tell ourselves that we are not really harming ourselves.



So who's to blame for 'making' us smoke tobacco cigarettes?



We each are. We each made a choice to continue to ingest nicotine or not. We now however make this choice in light of the full truth of nicotine addiction. OUR Nicotine Addiction.



We each choose from this moment on to reclaim our natural-born right to live free of a destructive and expensive in so many ways chemical addiction.
We are guaranteed to be successful by making a single choice.
By deciding right now to at first gain and then maintain our freedom
One day at a time  by Never Taking Another Puff .



JoeJ Free today for 21 months (1 year 9 months) since learning it was up to me and me only to choose to live my life free of nicotine addiction by deciding daily to Not Take A Puff!
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 30 Aug 2012, 14:04, edited 4 times in total.
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gally66
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 00:46

11 Oct 2006, 11:30 #2

Hi JoelFree:

I agree with you that it is our choice, to use tobacco or NOT to use tobacco; it is the same for all addictions. However, it also is true that some sort of support group can make a major difference, and for some such support is essential. I don't claim to understand this, but my experience in watching others not succeed makes it quite clear that many of us need help to maintain a positive attitude.

I am online tonight because I have been having some real doubts the past few days, primarily because I have gained over five pounds since quitting and have not been able to loose it. Every day particularly in the late afternoon and in the evening, I constantly have this desire for something, generally suggesting puting something into my mouth (for what is means if anything, I was a chewer for the last 15 years). I have managed to nibble to remove some of the crave, limited to about 2 or 3 times a day so I don't think this is the major source of the weight. I do have a greatly improved appetite so have tended to eat more in general but I am getting that under control. Also I go to the gym for an hour every other day so I am physically fit and feel good.

To finish my original theme, I have learned that just coming on this site and leaving a message, in response to someone or just for ME, it makes the issues clearer for me and easier to deal with for the moment. I do not intend to begin chewing tomorrow, but I appreciate being able to "spill" what is no my mind; if others have comments all the better, but just coming here is a mind healer for me.

Graham
Free for 4 months 10 day after not for 50+ years.
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smsh28
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 Oct 2006, 12:24 #3

I totally agree, Graham. This place is making all the difference for me.Image


BTW, I gained 30 lbs in five months the first time I quit for any length of time. It was one of the many reasons I gave myself for starting back. For the record...once I went back to smoking I was simply a smoker carrying around 30 extra lbs!

Shocker, eh?


Sonya
26 days
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Joe D0
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

11 Oct 2006, 17:20 #4

Fortyfive years ago I joined the military. I was a bright eyed, overzealous, patriot escaping the streets of New York to serve our country. I was a non-smoker. Boot camp was the most grueling experience of my life but Uncle Sam molded a juvenile delinquent into something this guy never thought he could be, I became a man! More than that, I became a Marine - awesome. This was back in 1961, a lifetime ago and it was a time when the horrors of nicotine addiction were not as well known as they are now.
OK, now here comes Joe's blame transference. We had just finished a long run in the sun complete with the loving chants of; one two three four I love the Marine Corps. When the unmercifully cruel and maniacal drill instructor (whom we loved and respected) finally called a halt we were exhausted. He said; "Smokers fall out." About ten recruits stood to the side and the DI let them smoke. He then said; "The rest of you maggots - on your faces, you do pushups until your buddies are finished their smokes." WHAT A GUY HUH?
Needless to say, the next time he said smokers fall out, there were far more than the initial ten recruits, the smokers group had at least doubled; me included. I remember all too well that first smoke, [a Lucky Strike] I gagged, it burned, and my eyes were running as fast as my nose. Yes, the other [smarter] guys did pushups again. Eventually smoking got easier to take and there you have it, I can blame my addiction on the Marines. Hey, maybe I can sue them? Yeah, right!

Joe Doherty - Free and Healing for One Month, Twenty Six Days, 20 Hours and 49 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 7 Days and 21 Hours, by avoiding the use of 2275 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $570.01.
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gally66
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 00:46

16 Oct 2006, 06:45 #5

Thanks for the encouragement Sonya, I will just have to deal with the weight gain problem I know, and hope that sufficient physical exercise and controlled eating will cause things to at least stablize and maybe even turn around.

JoeD: Thanks for being a Marine, and bless you for quitting after so many years. I could blame society also because 55 years ago anybody who wanted to be anybody (if you were a male) started smoking as a teenager. Interestingly, I had several peers in high school who have never smoked; they say it never had any appeal to them so clearly some of us are inclined to like it or are predisposed to at least to tolerating the process.

Graham
Free for 4 months 24 days (error previous post) after 50+ years not
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JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

02 Nov 2006, 03:43 #6

Who's to Blame?
My 'Junkie'?
or
Me the Junkie.
Crucial Difference.
What's to Blame? - A chemical compound.
Who's to Blame for Relapse?
After recovery of myself by myself for myself
& gettingfree of nicotine's grip?
The same person who gets the credit for NTAP!
'Just me'.

It's all Nicodemon's fault, not mine!
There is no Nicodemon. There never was. The title to this article, Nicodemon's lies is one of the biggest lies of all. They were never Nicodemon's lies but your lies. There is no nico-monster and there never has been. Nicotine is simply a chemical, a drug, an alkaloid known as C10H14N2, and its I.Q. is and always has been zero. It does not think, plan, inflict punishment, nor will it conspire to make you relapse or die addicted to it. The fact that it has zero intelligence is your greatest weapon. Everything you see, feel, and sense during nicotine withdrawal and recovery will be grounded in chemical dependency, conditioning, reason, logic or science. Any conspirators in any past attempts to make you relapse and destroy your recovery were always and only "you!" Should you reclaim control of your brain reward pathways, your health and your life, the victory will belong only to you!
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 29 Dec 2009, 05:20, edited 1 time in total.
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dennyb2
Joined: 31 Mar 2006, 08:00

03 Nov 2006, 06:32 #7

Who's to Blame?
A mirror is all that is necessary to answer this question.
We all know this because of the education we recieve here.
Although you may have one or even an entire list of reasons to the contrary, that is all they are is a list of reasons AKA excuses for your addiction.
Now look back in that mirror and embrace the fact that you are responsible for taking care of yourself.
Accept the fact that for this addiction, No Nicotine Today, is the simple guiding principle that will set you Free!
Read the posts Joe has included along with his own wisdom here. You are the ones with the minds capable of dealing with this insidious drug with an IQ of 0.
Take advantage of all that is so FREELY given here.
Attitude is everything, keep it positive, move forward and live life to its fullest. NTAP
Denny B - After 38 years - Free and Healing for Seven Months, Eight Days, 5 Hours and 30 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 27 Days, by avoiding the use of 7778 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $1,962.38.
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JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 Dec 2006, 20:02 #8

Who's to Blame?
My 'Junkie'?
or
Me the Junkie.
Crucial Difference.
What's to Blame? - A chemical compound.
Who's to Blame for Relapse?
After recovery of myself by myself for myself
& gettingfree of nicotine's grip?
The same person who gets the credit for NTAP!
'Just me'.
Reply

JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Mar 2007, 02:14 #9

  • I have to smoke because......
  • This situation is making me smoke because........
  • ........... is to blame for making me smoke tobacco and reinforce my nicotine addiction!
Blame transference, Denial and other rationalization techniques are part of the drug user's arsenal that helps explain their self-destructive behaviors. We have lied to ourselves and been fed lies about tobacco smoking by others for so long we have made them part of our belief systems.

The final truth
Junkie Thinking 
I am an addict! Hooray!
Restoring volume control
 
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 25 Mar 2014, 16:18, edited 2 times in total.
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freedom6 4
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:32

09 Jul 2007, 05:02 #10

Hello JoeJ,

I understand I am responsible for my addiction. For 30+ years, (commericals, media, news) have been telling us that smoking isn't harmful.(1960-late 70's) As a child, there were commercials big time about smoking. Marlboro Man was the largest. Everyone in film smoked cigarettes. It was the in thing.
I started smoking when I was 12 or 13, heck maybe younger, I don't remember. But I do remember attending church and feeling so bad I was smoking and ruining my temple. So I decided to quit. I had been on my own since 15, having my own apartment and going to school full-time. My smoking buddy (my mother) told me it wasn't bad to smoke. Look at your great-grandmother, she lived to be 78 or less. I can't remember.
I feel, it is not always totally our fault. People who we look up to even if they are negative influence in our lives, can help us to stay in our addiction. Well thank you for letting me vent. I feel better. No nicotine for me. Never. Ever.

Nicotine Free 36 Days and counting...........
Next chapter in my life, Learn to let Go, Learn to Forgive..........
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